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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2017

Albina Kinga Moscicka

The purpose of this paper is to propose a way of using already existing archival resources in the geographic information system (GIS).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a way of using already existing archival resources in the geographic information system (GIS).

Design/methodology/approach

The essence of the methodology used was to identify semantic relations of archival documents with geographical space and develop their metadata into spatially related metadata, ready to use in GIS and to join geographical names occurring in these metadata with exact places to which they were related to. Research was based on two digital collections from the Library of Contemporary History in Stuttgart on-line service. These collections were related to the First World War and they included metadata prepared in MAB standard.

Findings

As the results of the research, two sample metadata sets related to posters and ration coupons were developed. Thesauruses of coordinates of places and regions mentioned in documents metadata in different semantic context were also created. To complete the methodology, the assumptions of the GIS structure and concept of applying metadata in them, have been proposed.

Research limitations/implications

The research also presents limitations in effective implementation of the proposed solutions, which lie mainly in lack of rules and consequences in recording geographical names in metadata.

Originality/value

The value of the proposed solution is easy way of using already existing data in GIS and possibilities of gathering, managing, presenting and analyzing archives with one parameter more than in traditional databases – with spatial information. The added value and an effective use of already collected data lies in the strong recommendation of defining and implementation of rules for recording geographical names in archival documents metadata. This will help in a wide use of collected data in any spatial-based solutions as well as in automation of process of joining archives with geographical space, and finally in dissemination of collected resources.

Details

Program, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Mark Taylor, Emma Higgins and Paulo Lisboa

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and evaluation of a geographical information system (GIS) testing framework that was used to test a fire…

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1390

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and evaluation of a geographical information system (GIS) testing framework that was used to test a fire prevention support GIS.

Design/methodology/approach

A year‐long case study was undertaken concerning the testing of a fire prevention support GIS in a UK fire and rescue service.

Findings

The GIS testing framework developed involved testing the different components of a GIS, testing their interactions, and then testing the system as a whole. Since GISs contain different components such as spatial analyses and map‐based output, this supports the adoption of a different testing framework compared to existing types of information systems.

Research limitations/implications

GISs will typically be used by organisations for decision making. Clearly if the information presented by a GIS is inaccurate, unrepresentative, or unreliable, then the decision‐making process can be undermined.

Practical implications

This is particularly important with regard to GISs used by emergency services (such as the fire and rescue service studied) where lives could potentially be put at risk by erroneous information provided by such systems.

Originality/value

Previous research had indicated that GISs may be inadequately tested. The framework developed for GISs testing provided a systematic testing approach, reducing the likelihood of errors in such systems.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Mehri‐e‐Sedighi

This article seeks to demonstrate the use of geographical information system (GIS) in cataloging of documents, such as earthquake related documents.

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to demonstrate the use of geographical information system (GIS) in cataloging of documents, such as earthquake related documents.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was descriptive‐analytic and its steps are summarized as follows: collecting the data, entering information into the GIS, system management and finally producing outputs.

Findings

The investigative result shows that: by using of GIS, all types of data available in the various databases can be illustrated, analyzed and reviewed simultaneously and easily. Furthermore, data geographical dispersion can be easily studied and the geographic positions from the view point of earthquake and other related issues have been studied, identified and introduced to the users for doing studies.

Practical implications

There are numerous implications for current and future use of GIS in cataloging of documents. In addition to updating and editing functions, access to available data could be tailored to the various requirements of the users.

Originality/value

The system not only provides a tool for spotting numerous capabilities and potential but is also useful for identifying research gaps in different geographic regions.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

James E. Bruno

Observes, while most school site management personnel are familiar with the multitude of visual representations of statistical data, via graphs and charts, the value of…

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1268

Abstract

Observes, while most school site management personnel are familiar with the multitude of visual representations of statistical data, via graphs and charts, the value of visual representations of geographical information remains largely unknown in educational management. Explains that geographical information systems (GIS), in addition to determining the exact geographical street address location of a client, can also overlay important SES, thematic information such as demographic characteristics (per capita household income, percentage, minority, etc.), and man‐made, and when natural geographical barriers are combined a powerful visual representation or picture of a client service area emerges. Describes how these visual representations of educational service areas can then be used to support educational policy analysis and school site management. Presents several illustrations of how GIS mapping procedures can be applied to school site management, planning and policy analysis. Draws three illustrations of GIS mapping from the school management areas of co‐ordination of school site outreach services to educational policy areas of ensuring “equity” in access to instructional services. Explores extensions of GIS mapping procedures to other areas in educational policy analysis and school site management.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Andrew M. Hawkins

Describes the the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) asdecision support tools in public libraries in England. A GIS is acomputer software system that represents…

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1748

Abstract

Describes the the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) as decision support tools in public libraries in England. A GIS is a computer software system that represents data in a geographic dimension. GIS as a decision support tool in public libraries is in its infancy; only seven out of 40 libraries contacted in the survey have GIS projects, three of which are at an advanced stage. Libraries are using GIS for the display of users as postcode data over a layer of wards thematically shaded as demographic data. This provides information for library management. Users can be represented as having books on loan, or as answering a user satisfaction survey. Decisions made on these data are: mobile library routes, area management initiatives, service targeting and capital development programmes.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Martin Ralphs and Peter Wyatt

Since the Audit Commission’s report on local authority property management in 1987 and subsequent publications, there has been substantial investment in geographic and…

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1350

Abstract

Since the Audit Commission’s report on local authority property management in 1987 and subsequent publications, there has been substantial investment in geographic and land information systems (GIS/LIS) by local government. This paper reviews the issues associated with the uptake of information technology (IT) for property management within local government, taking the Audit Commission’s findings as its starting point. It considers how authorities have taken up new technologies and describes progress in this area. British Standard BS 7666 for geographical referencing presents new opportunities for integrated property management in local authorities. The paper discusses this development, drawing on examples from local authorities. The paper concludes by examining the Western Australian Land Information System (WALIS). This is an example of how information sharing between local and central government organisations can add value to data sets collected and maintained by each, reduce duplication of effort and offer a more consistent service.

Details

Property Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Ashley Beamer

The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of the issues surrounding the cataloguing of maps in archives and libraries. An investigation into appropriate…

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1329

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of the issues surrounding the cataloguing of maps in archives and libraries. An investigation into appropriate metadata formats, such as MARC21, EAD and Dublin Core with RDF, shows how particular map data can be stored. Mathematical map elements, specifically co‐ordinates, are explored as a source of optimal retrieval.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on both the personal experiences of map cataloguers as well as previous literature on map retrieval elements, metadata formats and map retrieval systems.

Findings

The difficulties behind map cataloguing do not lie in metadata file formats but rather in maps themselves, staff and budget. They also lie in the lack of map‐appropriate retrieval systems and the lack of co‐ordinate search capabilities.

Practical implications

The practical implications of this work reflect the necessity for strong map‐retrieval systems and strength of available metadata formats to store essential map data for retrieval. Future map cataloguers should secure appropriate systems for retrieval and include geographical location information, specifically numerical co‐ordinates.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight into current issues in map data and the file formats currently used for storing this data. It also investigates current map‐friendly systems in use by libraries and archives.

Details

Program, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Pieter A. van Brakel and Martie Pienaar

Geographic information systems (GIS) are increasingly being used for effective accessibility to spatial data. A GIS comprises much more than the mere storage of data…

Abstract

Geographic information systems (GIS) are increasingly being used for effective accessibility to spatial data. A GIS comprises much more than the mere storage of data: spatial data of the earth is being manipulated to create new information, perform complex spatial analyses, and generate maps and reports. An automated GIS system consists of an integrated digital database containing information about geographic features (points, lines and areas); the hardware, software and people used in the analysis of the features (geographic coordinate data); and a description of features (attribute data). It also provides the ability to query, manipulate and analyse the data. However, certain problems exist in the way access is gained to geographic data. Currently geographic data sets (e.g. maps) are scattered across South Africa and the world, with no standardised method of accessing them. Data needed by a specific GIS system must be ‘ordered’ or downloaded from a remote site. No centralised index to existing geographic data exists. The results from a specific GIS analysis are not necessarily directly available to others. When downloading and thus duplicating a set of complex data from an external site, with the purpose of further manipulation, the copy gradually becomes less current when compared to the original data set. In this paper it is argued that most of these problems can be addressed effectively by making GIS data and information available via the Internet's World Wide Web. By creating hypertext links between different GIS sites, data sets could be shared between sites: a type of online atlas system with a task‐oriented user interface geared towards map creation and fact extraction could be developed. A number of experimental interfaces between GIS application software and the Web have already been developed: these and other approaches are discussed.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Vincent‐Wayne Mitchell

A new census was carried out in 1991 and local authorities will bekeen to analyse the changes which have occurred since the last census.Their analysis will be helped by…

Abstract

A new census was carried out in 1991 and local authorities will be keen to analyse the changes which have occurred since the last census. Their analysis will be helped by the introduction of geographical information systems which have been recommended by the Chorley Report. Examines the findings of ten in‐depth interviews with local authority officers within planning departments.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Vincent‐Wayne Mitchell

1991 has seen a new census and local authorities will be keen toanalyse the changes which have occurred since the last census. Theiranalysis will be helped by the…

Abstract

1991 has seen a new census and local authorities will be keen to analyse the changes which have occurred since the last census. Their analysis will be helped by the introduction of Geographical Information Systems which have been recommended by the Chorley Report. The findings of ten in‐depth interviews with local authority officers within planning departments are examined in this pilot study. These officers were asked about Geographical Information Systems, the Population Census and the Census of Distribution.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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