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1 – 10 of 172
Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Peter Kieseberg, Sebastian Schrittwieser, Lorcan Morgan, Martin Mulazzani, Markus Huber and Edgar Weippl

Today's database management systems implement sophisticated access control mechanisms to prevent unauthorized access and modifications. For instance, this is an important basic…

Abstract

Purpose

Today's database management systems implement sophisticated access control mechanisms to prevent unauthorized access and modifications. For instance, this is an important basic requirement for SOX (Sarbanes‐Oxley Act) compliance, whereby every past transaction has to be traceable at any time. However, malicious database administrators may still be able to bypass the security mechanisms in order to make hidden modifications to the database. This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper the authors define a novel signature of a B+‐tree, a widely‐used storage structure in database management systems, and propose its utilization for supporting the logging in databases. This additional logging mechanism is especially useful in conjunction with forensic techniques that directly target the underlying tree‐structure of an index. Several techniques for applying this signature in the context of digital forensics on B+‐trees are proposed in the course of this paper. Furthermore, the authors' signature can be used to generate exact copies of an index for backup purposes, thereby enabling the owner to completely restore data, even on the structural level.

Findings

For database systems in enterprise environments, compliance to regulatory standards such as SOX (Sarbanes‐Oxley Act), whereby every past transaction has to be traceable at any time, is a fundamental requirement. Today's database management systems usually implement sophisticated access control mechanisms to prevent unauthorized access and modifications. Nonetheless malicious database administrators would be able to bypass the security mechanisms in order to make modifications to the database, while covering their tracks.

Originality/value

In this paper, the authors demonstrate how the tree structure of the underlying store engine can be used to enhance forensic logging mechanisms of the database. They define a novel signature for B+‐trees, which are used by the InnoDB storage engine. This signature stores the structure of database storage files and can help in reconstructing previous versions of the file for forensic purposes. Furthermore, the authors' signature can be used to generate exact copies of an index for backup purposes, thus enabling the owner to completely restore data, even on the structural level. The authors applied their concept to four real‐life scenarios in order to evaluate its effectiveness.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Ceasar Douglas

Redesign activity is taking place within organizations faced with rapidly changing business environments. In this article, the current state of organization redesign, the role of…

2662

Abstract

Redesign activity is taking place within organizations faced with rapidly changing business environments. In this article, the current state of organization redesign, the role of information systems, and the effect of redesign activities on job satisfaction and motivation are reviewed. The current state and projected trends are then related to a field study conducted at the Zeeland, Michigan, machine processing plant (ZMP) of Herman Miller. Interviews with both hourly and managerial personnel were conducted. The results of the interviews suggest that effective redesign efforts focus on the human or intangible aspects, as well as structural changes.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Jørgen P. Bansler and Erling Havn

This paper seeks to analyze the role of network effects in relation to the adoption and use of systems for knowledge sharing in organizations and draws on recent developments…

1597

Abstract

This paper seeks to analyze the role of network effects in relation to the adoption and use of systems for knowledge sharing in organizations and draws on recent developments within network economics to outline a theoretical perspective on the implementation of knowledge repositories in organizations. Findings from a longitudinal field study are presented to explore the concept of network effects in more detail. Commonly associated with economics, the concept of network effects can also be used in an organizational context to study adoption dynamics and use patterns when new information and communication technologies are introduced. The analysis of the field study data shows that knowledge repositories exhibit strong network effects, which can complicate the implementation process in multiple ways. The research is based on a single, in‐depth case study. Future research should study the role of network effects in relation to other technologies and organizational contexts. It underscores the need to be aware of – and try to manage – network effects when implementing knowledge repositories and other “networked” technologies. By and large, IS researchers have overlooked the role of network effects in relation to information and communication technologies in organizations. This paper begins to address this gap by focusing on the role of network effects in the adoption and use of knowledge repositories. It is suggested that the concept of network effects provides a useful theoretical lens in a number of other cases.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Bill Doolin

Traditional definitions of decision support systems emphasise their support role in individual decision making and utilise notions of rational choice. By considering decisions as…

Abstract

Traditional definitions of decision support systems emphasise their support role in individual decision making and utilise notions of rational choice. By considering decisions as an organisational activity, the interpretation of decision support systems use in organisations can move beyond this technical rational understanding, to include potential political and legitimating roles for these systems. These three possible interpretations are discussed in relation to the implementation of a large decision support system in a local government context described by Dutton (1981). In its technical role, the system was used as part of a rational planning agenda. However, the system was clearly also used politically, to promote particular interests and as a lever in negotiations between various groups. Part of the appeal of the decision support system was the appearance of rationality and technical neutrality that it gave to the planning and decision making process, and the legitimation it provided with external constituents. The paper concludes that an unquestioning acceptance of the technical received view of decision support system use is limiting, and that a more reflective approach to their development, implementation and use is required.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2015

Abstract

Details

Knowing, Becoming, doing as Teacher Educators: Identity, Intimate Scholarship, Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-140-4

Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Jeffrey W. Alstete and John P. Meyer

The purpose of this paper is to examine the application of intelligent agents (IAs) in organizational memory systems within the larger schema of knowledge management (KM…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the application of intelligent agents (IAs) in organizational memory systems within the larger schema of knowledge management (KM) strategies. This includes targeted roles of IAs in relation to institutional memory approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual exploration of related sections of the Grundspenkis seven-layer intelligent enterprise memory framework that serves to identify, retain, deliver and reuse information for future utilization is conducted. Applications of IAs in multiple industries are presented to illustrate the conceptual model in practice.

Findings

This paper identifies arising roles that IAs perform in information search, retrieval and analysis in the organizational memory formation process and extensions that have emerged in a non-linear bi-directional form. These layered roles include obtaining and reapplying important information as part of extended human–machine cognition.

Research limitations/implications

While exploratory and conceptual in nature, this research paper discusses IAs as possible components in the advancement of organization memory.

Practical implications

By analyzing the application of IAs in different industries, across select layers of a KM structure, groundwork is laid for both descriptive research (i.e. where and how artificial intelligence is being used in those industries) and prescriptive practice (i.e. how other industries can benefit from such assistance and what patterns of implementation to expect).

Originality/value

This study explores the role IAs play in helping knowledge workers gather, retain and find relevant information and how KM strategies may assist organizational memory.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 July 2023

David S. Bedford, Markus Granlund and Kari Lukka

The authors examine how performance measurement systems (PMSs) and academic agency influence the meaning of research quality in practice. The worries are that the notion of…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors examine how performance measurement systems (PMSs) and academic agency influence the meaning of research quality in practice. The worries are that the notion of research quality is becoming too simplistically and narrowly determined by research quality's measurable proxies and that academics, especially manager-academics, do not sufficiently realise this risk. Whilst prior literature has covered the effects of performance measurement in the university sector broadly and how PMSs are mobilised locally, there is only little understanding of whether and how PMSs affect the meaning of research quality in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is designed as a comparative case study of two university faculties in Finland. The role of conceptual analysis plays a notable role in the study, too.

Findings

The authors find that manager-academics of the two examined faculties have rather similar conceptual understandings of research quality. However, there were differences in the degree of slippage between the “espoused-meaning” of research quality and “meaning-in-practice” of research quality. The authors traced these differences to how the local PMS and manager-academics’ agency relate to one another within the context of increasing global and national performance pressures. The authors developed a tentative framework for the various “styles of agency”. This suggests how the relationship between the local PMS and manager-academics’ exerted agency shapes the “degrees of freedom” of the meaning of research quality in practice.

Originality/value

Given that research quality lies at the heart of academic work, the authors' paper indicates that exploring the three matters – performance measurement, the agency of manager-academics and the meaning of research quality in practice – in combination is crucial for the sustainability of the academe. The authors contribute to the literature by detailing the way in which local PMS and manager-academics' agency have material impacts on what research quality means in practice. The authors conclude by highlighting the pressing need for manager-academics to exercise the agency in efforts to safeguard a broad and pluralistic understanding of research quality in practice.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Christina Öberg, Markus Klinton and Helen Stockhult

Incubators, as providers of advice and resources, suggest fostering the development of early-idea firms. Literature and practice seem to suggest an ever-increasing amount of…

Abstract

Purpose

Incubators, as providers of advice and resources, suggest fostering the development of early-idea firms. Literature and practice seem to suggest an ever-increasing amount of incubator support. The creation of business relationships is at the heart of any business development, and this paper addresses whether a laissez-faire incubator fosters the creation of business relationships. The purpose of this paper is to explore the creation of business relationships among incubated firms during and after their time in the incubator along with the roles that these relationships play for the incubated firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirically, the paper is based on retrospective interviews with representatives of all incubated firms in a university incubator. A total of fifteen interviews were conducted with representatives of the incubated firms, the incubator and its owners, complemented by secondary data sources.

Findings

The paper points out three antecedents for business relationship creation: the lack of experience and connections; convenience; and trust based on the interactions with others in the incubator. These antecedents are connected to the roles of transforming businesses and of adaptation in the dyadic relationships. The laissez-faire incubator helped through the learning-by-doing among the incubated firms, which made them focus on business relationship creation from early on.

Originality/value

Most incubator research portrays the unilateral transfer of knowledge from the incubator to the incubated firm, with the latter being a service taker rather than a co-producer. The paper adds knowledge about business relationships among firms in incubators and the roles that these business relationships could play for the firms. The focus on an incubator providing limited support is of high practical relevance, given the trend of incubators facilitating more and more services.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Fatemeh Rahimi, Charles Møller and Lars Hvam

The purpose of this paper is to explore the fit between process standardization and international management strategy of multinational corporations (MNCs) by assessing the…

2655

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the fit between process standardization and international management strategy of multinational corporations (MNCs) by assessing the compatibility between process standardization and corporate structural characteristics in terms of asset configuration and headquarters-subsidiary relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

First, after a literature review on MNCs’ strategy and process standardization, the study suggests two propositions on the fit between corporate international management strategy and process standardization. Second, to empirically examine the propositions, the study investigates the outcome of process standardization in three cases with different strategic and structural contexts. Third, using the propositions and empirical findings, the study proposes a framework for aligning process standardization with MNCs’ structural characteristics.

Findings

Process standardization has a higher degree of fit in MNCs pursuing global integration where process standardization parallels the need for coordinating interdependencies in the functional structure, and is consistent with the headquarters’ operational control over the subsidiaries. Process standardization has a lower degree of fit in MNCs seeking local responsiveness as process standardization disturbs the financial control relationship between the headquarters and subsidiaries and is less crucial for coordination as the subsidiaries contain the necessary coordination mechanisms.

Originality/value

The study provides in-depth understanding of how the international management strategy and consequent structural characteristics of MNCs affects process standardization in the course of a global enterprise resource planning implementation. The study proposes conditions of fit for aligning process standardization with asset configuration and headquarters-subsidiary relationships of an MNC.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2015

Abstract

Details

Knowing, Becoming, doing as Teacher Educators: Identity, Intimate Scholarship, Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-140-4

1 – 10 of 172