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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Malcolm Wolski, Louise Howard and Joanna Richardson

This paper aims to outline principal implications for institutions, particularly universities, in supporting the increasingly complex tools which are used in the data lifecycle.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline principal implications for institutions, particularly universities, in supporting the increasingly complex tools which are used in the data lifecycle.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion paper draws upon the experience of authors in this domain at the institutional, national and international levels.

Findings

Support for research tools by universities has high-level implications, ranging from financial, strategic and compliance through to capacity, capability and connectivity. The large number of existing tools highlights the need to evaluate them against standardised checklists to determine suitability and levels of resources required for support. Librarians and other information professionals need to expand their current support for research tools beyond the discovery phase to the entire data lifecycle.

Practical implications

Universities can use this paper to assess their maturity in supporting tools in the data lifecycle. Librarians, in particular, can broaden their knowledge of the various categories of tools which support specific aspects of that lifecycle.

Originality/value

While much attention is currently being focused on supporting researchers with their data management requirements, there is a general lack of literature on how to support tools as a critical element in enhancing research outcomes.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2017

Muhammad Yousuf Ali, Malcolm Wolski and Joanna Richardson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how to help improve a higher education institution’s research profile by using existing resources and existing research outputs.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how to help improve a higher education institution’s research profile by using existing resources and existing research outputs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was based on quantitative data extracted manually from QS University Rankings-Asia 2016, the 2015 Ranking of Pakistani higher education institutions (HEI) and ResearchGate (RG). Resultant data were loaded into Excel and analyzed in SPSS version 21.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that, while there is no direct correlation between an institution’s national/international ranking and its respective RG score, there is a tendency for lower-ranked institutions to have a lower RG score.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to data extracted from RG; however, it would be useful to apply the same methodology to other relevant academic scholarly network sites (ASNS).

Practical implications

This paper has suggested strategies which may be of relevance to those institutions in other countries which are aspiring to lift their national ranking through improved research profiles. Libraries are important contributors to the support of institutional research goals.

Originality/value

There have been no previous published research studies on either the potential for ASNS to contribute to enhancing research outcomes for Pakistani HEI or the role that libraries could play in supporting these outcomes.

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2009

Georgina Davis and Malcolm Wolski

This paper seeks to provide details of Griffith University's (GU) approach for sustainably dealing with electronic waste (e‐waste) and the benefits of using the e‐waste…

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3177

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide details of Griffith University's (GU) approach for sustainably dealing with electronic waste (e‐waste) and the benefits of using the e‐waste programme as a valuable educational case study for ESD.

Design/methodology/approach

The e‐waste programme is explained with reference to key resources and literature, so as to provide a practical approach for any organisation looking to sustainably manage its e‐waste stream. The rationale and structure for the e‐waste educational case study is also presented so that other academics may use it as a template or study aid within their own teaching.

Findings

The paper provides references to web resources and GU internal resources so that readers can access valuable information, and to show how those resources can be applied to their own organisation. The paper also identifies and discusses the factors which may hinder the implementation of a sustainable e‐waste programme.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has been written to be as succinct and as accessible to readers as possible and, as such, has not presented each of the aspects of the sustainable e‐waste programme in depth. This information, for those requiring more detail, is accessible through the resources presented.

Practical implications

The paper is a useful source on how e‐wastes can be sustainably managed by Universities and presents a modelled approach.

Originality/value

This paper highlights an individual response to an increasingly complex and potentially polluting and unsustainable waste stream. It provides a practical institution‐wide approach for dealing with e‐wastes; and in particular, raises the awareness of the issues associated with e‐waste to those institutions who may not be aware.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2015

Samantha Searle, Malcolm Wolski, Natasha Simons and Joanna Richardson

The purpose of this paper is to describe the evolution to date and future directions in research data policy, infrastructure, skills development and advisory services in…

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2605

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the evolution to date and future directions in research data policy, infrastructure, skills development and advisory services in an Australian university, with a focus on the role of librarians.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have been involved in the development of research data services at Griffith, and the case study presents observations and reflections arising from their first-hand experiences.

Findings

Griffith University’s organisational structure and “whole-of-enterprise” approach has facilitated service development to support research data. Fostering strong national partnerships has also accelerated development of institutional capability. Policies and strategies are supported by pragmatic best practice guidelines aimed directly at researchers. Iterative software development and a commitment to well-supported enterprise infrastructure enable the provision of a range of data management solutions. Training programs, repository support and data planning services are still relatively immature. Griffith recognises that information services staff (including librarians) will need more opportunities to develop knowledge and skills to support these services as they evolve.

Originality/value

This case study provides examples of library-led and library-supported activities that could be used for comparative purposes by other libraries. At the same time, it provides a critical perspective by contrasting areas of good practice within the University with those of less satisfactory progress. While other institutions may have different constraints or opportunities, some of the major concepts within this paper may prove useful to advance the development of research data capability and capacity across the library profession.

Details

Program: electronic library and information systems, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

JoAnne Sparks, Linda O'Brien, Joanna Richardson, Malcolm Wolski, Sanja Tadic and Joanne Morris

The purpose of this paper is to report on “turning a new page” (TNP), a business improvement initiative undertaken by Scholarly Information & Research (SIR). The aim is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on “turning a new page” (TNP), a business improvement initiative undertaken by Scholarly Information & Research (SIR). The aim is to embed innovation and integrate e‐research and library services. SIR is part of the Information Services (INS) division at Griffith University, one of the top research universities in Australia. SIR provides library services, publication support and eResearch services to over 43,000 students and staff at five campuses and online.

Design/methodology/approach

TNP combines methods from best practices around continuous improvement, change management and business planning to achieve better alignment operationally and to prioritise potential improvements to services. The focus is on services required in three to five years for the “new generation” of users who will need them.

Findings

Existing services were unevenly delivered and resources unevenly distributed. A key initial step is restructuring to collocate similar capabilities and redistribute resources, and provides a framework for developing future capacity. The integrated staffing approach nurtures innovation and skills development.

Originality/value

Integrating e‐research services with library services to this extent has not been achieved in an Australian context before. The combination of methods applied and the progress achieved to date illustrates the value of the approach and may be relevant for other research‐intensive universities.

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