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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2021

Nazrinda A. Samah, Lokman Mohd Tahir and Wan Ali @ Wan Yusoff Wan Mamat

This qualitative study explores the issue of library management support in providing a self-directed learning environment for research-support librarians which is an…

Abstract

Purpose

This qualitative study explores the issue of library management support in providing a self-directed learning environment for research-support librarians which is an under-explored feature of librarianship in Malaysian public university libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of nine research-support librarians purposely selected from these libraries took part in in-depth interview sessions. The responses were analysed using Miles and Huberman's technique, which involves data reduction, data display, conclusion-drawing and verification.

Findings

Five emerging themes and 31 sub-themes were identified. There was a general consensus among the respondents that their library management does provide research-support librarians with a self-directed learning environment to enhance their competencies as academic librarians. Nevertheless, these librarians also highlighted some challenges, issues and barriers related to the initiative and support received. Some suggestions are advanced for improvements to support self-directed learning by research-support librarians working in public university libraries.

Originality/value

Empirically, this study attempts to fill the gap in the knowledge that needs to be addressed from the perspective of Malaysian librarians, especially the research-support librarians, who serve in public universities in Malaysia, who have received little attention from local librarianship researchers.

Details

Library Management, vol. 42 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Llarina González-Solar and Viviana Fernández-Marcial

Academic libraries are undergoing a paradigm shift of service, due to various changes in their environment and internally. The maker culture is one of these factors and…

Abstract

Academic libraries are undergoing a paradigm shift of service, due to various changes in their environment and internally. The maker culture is one of these factors and implies challenges regarding space, infrastructures, and services organization. This situation extends to research support services, in which the users have a particular informative behavior. This chapter aims to analyze whether the academic library has created research support services adapted to the era of maker culture. It examines how research is a key factor in the higher education system to contextualize the importance of research support services in academic libraries. How the researcher accepts or not the role of academic libraries in the process of production and communication of research is studied. As critical elements of the process, we examine part of researcher information behavior in the era of maker culture and the relationship of these users with librarians.

Details

Examining the impact of industry 4.0 on academic libraries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-656-5

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2021

Seperia Bwadene Wanyama and Samuel Eyamu

This paper aims at examining graduate research supervisors' perceptions of organizational and job supervisors' support and their influence on research completion rate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at examining graduate research supervisors' perceptions of organizational and job supervisors' support and their influence on research completion rate. While research supervision has been mainly examined from pedagogical perspectives, little emphasis has been placed on the human resource management (HRM) activity for academics. This review paper draws from organizational support and social exchange theories (SET) to examine the influence of perceived organizational support (POS) and perceived supervisor support (PSS) in research supervision work.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a narrative literature review of identified relevant readings on organizational support and social exchange, research supervisors' perceived support and their implications for research.

Findings

Research supervisors examine their perceptions of administrative, professional, financial and socio-emotional support from their universities and job supervisors. They in turn feel obligated to reciprocate, for example, through commitment, engagement and performance, towards meeting their goals with the organization, the job supervisor and the student.

Research limitations/implications

The study relied on a literature review; hence, the findings may not reflect actual expressions of research supervisors' perceptions.

Practical implications

The paper shows the application of organizational support and social exchange theories in academic work. It emphasizes the importance of support, perception and reciprocation through an exchange relationship. The research support framework is a guide to managing the relationships among the parties involved in research work.

Originality/value

The paper considers research supervisors as key human resources (HRs) that espouse supportive HRM practices from both the organization and the job supervisor. This is unlike most studies that have employed only pedagogical approaches in explaining research. It further develops a research supervision support framework.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Examining the impact of industry 4.0 on academic libraries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-656-5

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2012

Ricardo R. Andrade and Christine E. Kollen

As any library strives to improve services and make them increasingly relevant, planning for change has become routine. During 2011, the University of Arizona's Libraries…

Abstract

As any library strives to improve services and make them increasingly relevant, planning for change has become routine. During 2011, the University of Arizona's Libraries undertook extensive assessments in order to develop and improve services in support of research and grant services so that campus-wide achievements in research, scholarship, and creative works could improve. A project explored ways for the library to become more effective at increasing research and grant support to faculty, researchers, and graduate students in a scalable way, and to help the campus increase achievements in research, scholarship, and creative works. The project defined the library's role in research and grant activities and explored ways for the library to be involved at optimal points in these cycles. This chapter discusses the process developed for assessing what new research and grant support services the library might want to develop. This involved interviewing peer university libraries and surveying faculty and graduate students at the University of Arizona about their research and grant needs. The chapter also describes how results were analyzed to identify potential new library services. The project team recommended new services which were presented to the library for inclusion in its Strategic Plan. The methodology presented in this chapter can be used by any type of library for developing new services to include in their strategic plans.

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Li Si, Yueliang Zeng, Sicheng Guo and Xiaozhe Zhuang

This paper aims at understanding the current situation of research support services offered by academic libraries in world-leading universities and providing useful…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at understanding the current situation of research support services offered by academic libraries in world-leading universities and providing useful implications and insights for other academic libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

Of the top 100 universities listed in the QS World University Rankings in 2017, 76 libraries were selected as samples and a website investigation was conducted to explore the research support services. The statistical method and visualization software was used to generalize the key services, and the text analysis and case analysis were applied to reveal the corresponding implementation.

Findings

Research support service has become one of the significant services of academic libraries in the context of e-research and data-intensive research. The research support services can be generally divided into seven aspects, as follows: research data management (62, 81.58 per cent), open access (64, 84.21 per cent), scholarly publishing (59, 77.63 per cent), research impact measurement (32, 42.11 per cent), research guides (47, 61.84 per cent), research consultation (59, 77.63 per cent) and research tools recommendation (38, 50.00 per cent).

Originality/value

This paper makes a comprehensive investigation of research support services in academic libraries of top-ranking universities worldwide. The findings will help academic libraries improve research support services; thus, advancing the work of researchers and promoting scientific discovery.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

Mary Anne Kennan, Sheila Corrall and Waseem Afzal

How academic libraries support the research of their parent institutions has changed as a result of forces such as changing scholarly communication practices…

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3295

Abstract

Purpose

How academic libraries support the research of their parent institutions has changed as a result of forces such as changing scholarly communication practices, technological developments, reduced purchasing power and changes in academic culture. The purpose of this paper is to examine the professional and educational implications of current and emerging research support environments for academic libraries, particularly with regard to research data management and bibliometrics and discuss how do professionals and educators “make space” as new service demands arise?

Design/methodology/approach

The present paper uses data from a recent survey of research support provision by academic libraries in Australia, New Zealand, the UK and Ireland, (authors 2013), and provides additional in depth analysis of the textual responses to extend the analysis in the light of forces for change in higher education. The original online questionnaire surveyed current and planned research support in academic libraries, and constraints or support needs related to service developments. It was distributed to 219 institutions in Australia, New Zealand, the UK, and Ireland, and obtained 140 valid responses (response rate of 63.9 percent). Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics with thematic categorization and coding for the textual responses.

Findings

Most academic libraries surveyed are already providing or planning services in the focal areas of bibliometrics and data management. There was also increasing demand for other research support services, not the focus of the study, such as eresearch support, journal publishing platforms, and grant writing support. The authors found that while many academic libraries perceive increasing research support services as a “huge opportunity” they were constrained by gaps in staff skills, knowledge, and confidence and resourcing issues. With regard to staff education and training, it was reported they require a broader understanding of the changing research and scholarly landscape, the research cultures of different disciplines, and technological change. There was a near-universal support for development of more comprehensive, specialized, LIS education to prepare professionals for broader research support roles.

Originality/value

This further analysis of the implications of our survey in relation to influences such as economics, academic culture, technology, raises questions for both educators and practitioners about the future direction of the profession and how the authors collectively “make space” as new potential services arise.

Details

Library Management, vol. 35 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Liz Walkley Hall

The purpose of this paper is to describe the mechanisms used by Flinders University Library to sustain a culture of research. Flinders University Library has been…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the mechanisms used by Flinders University Library to sustain a culture of research. Flinders University Library has been supporting its librarians to undertake research projects using a formal support group mechanism, known as the Research Working Group (RWG), sanctioned and resourced by library executive since 2010. This established a culture of practitioner-based research in the library, with the librarians developing a greater understanding of both the theory and practice of qualitative and quantitative methods by undertaking their own research projects. However, sustaining a research this culture brings new challenges which this paper now explores.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study describes the methods used at Flinders University Library in sustaining a culture of practitioner-research. This arose from a review of the formal support structure, as well as a previous study that surveyed staff responses to the RWG.

Findings

As academic libraries face ongoing challenges and engage more broadly with research support, librarians need experiential knowledge of research. In the case of Flinders University Library, the author has found that, in seeking to sustain a research culture, the author has needed to adapt the support mechanisms, including a greater emphasis on peer support, a different model of resourcing and more inclusivity for all staff to engage with research work.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited by its scope as a single-institution case study; however, there are opportunities for other academic libraries to learn from this experience.

Originality/value

Establishing a culture of practice-based research is not an easy undertaking, requiring dedication from all parties whether management, practitioner-researchers or mentors. While there are many examples in the literature of case studies examining the establishment of research culture, few if any take the next steps to explore how to maintain it. This paper seeks to fill that gap.

Details

Library Management, vol. 39 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Malcolm Wolski, Louise Howard and Joanna Richardson

This paper aims to outline principal implications for institutions, particularly universities, in supporting the increasingly complex tools which are used in the data lifecycle.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline principal implications for institutions, particularly universities, in supporting the increasingly complex tools which are used in the data lifecycle.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion paper draws upon the experience of authors in this domain at the institutional, national and international levels.

Findings

Support for research tools by universities has high-level implications, ranging from financial, strategic and compliance through to capacity, capability and connectivity. The large number of existing tools highlights the need to evaluate them against standardised checklists to determine suitability and levels of resources required for support. Librarians and other information professionals need to expand their current support for research tools beyond the discovery phase to the entire data lifecycle.

Practical implications

Universities can use this paper to assess their maturity in supporting tools in the data lifecycle. Librarians, in particular, can broaden their knowledge of the various categories of tools which support specific aspects of that lifecycle.

Originality/value

While much attention is currently being focused on supporting researchers with their data management requirements, there is a general lack of literature on how to support tools as a critical element in enhancing research outcomes.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Tessa Withorn, Jillian Eslami, Hannah Lee, Maggie Clarke, Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Cristina Springfield, Dana Ospina, Anthony Andora, Amalia Castañeda, Alexandra Mitchell, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Wendolyn Vermeer and Aric Haas

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography…

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1007

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2020.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 440 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested in a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 49 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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