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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1983

E. Carlson, M. Kipps and J. Thomson

Many case studies on minority ethnic groups have been concerned with the social, structural and economic patterns of these communities. Knowing how these patterns have influenced…

Abstract

Many case studies on minority ethnic groups have been concerned with the social, structural and economic patterns of these communities. Knowing how these patterns have influenced the ethnic identity in some cases, the authors believe that they can extrapolate from the strength of the social cohesion of a group to the possible strength of the group's traditional food habits. This series of articles emphasises the strength of traditional food habits in a different cultural environment, and the factors which contribute to this strength.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 83 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Barbara Dexter

This paper aims to explore a leadership development intervention activity to solve an organisational problem and seeks to identify critical success factors for the design and…

4680

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore a leadership development intervention activity to solve an organisational problem and seeks to identify critical success factors for the design and delivery of such activities.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a case study employing a mixed‐method approach within an action research methodology. The participants were a student group of 19, plus the teaching team and client‐training adviser. The project used questionnaires for identifying and ranking critical success factors and focus groups to explore transferability and other issues. These were supplemented by e‐mail and telephone communications.

Findings

The critical success factors involved people, task, process, and location and facilities dimensions. Most were deemed transferable, but with certain warnings about key factors.

Research limitations/implications

This is a small‐scale study and issues of transferability of findings are acknowledged. Contextual details are presented to reduce the effect of the limitation.

Practical implications

The findings are of high practical value for leadership development and for organisations seeking new ways of addressing organisational challenges using internal staff.

Originality/value

The paper has value in its practical and theoretical contribution. The identification of critical success factors for such intervention activities is new and the opportunity for application adds further value to the work.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

A. Eves, M. Corney, M. Kipps, M. Lumbers, M. Price and C. Noble

Reports on a study which addressed meal selection in catering outlets (e.g. school or workplace canteens) from the perspective of the caterer and consumer. Asks what foods are…

1573

Abstract

Reports on a study which addressed meal selection in catering outlets (e.g. school or workplace canteens) from the perspective of the caterer and consumer. Asks what foods are supplied and why these are chosen. Questionnaires were sent to a selection of catering colleges, school and workplace canteens and to a general catering industry sample.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Nicholas J. Jardine

Briefly outlines main objectives of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) research programme Food Acceptability and Choice. Looks at the project portfolio and…

524

Abstract

Briefly outlines main objectives of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) research programme Food Acceptability and Choice. Looks at the project portfolio and lists recent, current and future research topics by author. Concludes by listing relevant literature from the MAFF programme.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Abigail L. Burgess and Valda W. Bunker

The present study compared the calculated nutritional content of midday meals eaten by primary schoolchildren (n=90, 45 boys, 45 girls, mean age 10.5±0.4 years), in the Portsmouth…

1798

Abstract

The present study compared the calculated nutritional content of midday meals eaten by primary schoolchildren (n=90, 45 boys, 45 girls, mean age 10.5±0.4 years), in the Portsmouth area, with the Caroline Walker Trust (CWT) published guidelines. Comp‐Eat 5 was used to determine the dietary content of children’s midday meals. Children’s lunchtime meals were not deficient in essential micronutrients; however, the macronutrient content of their diet differed significantly from the published guidelines. Data analysis also revealed that significant differences were evident between the macronutrient content of the two meal subgroups (food provided by the school, referred to as “school meals” and food brought from home, referred to as a “packed lunch”). In conclusion, several changes need to be made to midday meals, eaten by primary schoolchildren, before they will meet the CWT guidelines, and the two meal subgroups require separate solutions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Claire Seaman and Julia Moss

Obesity among primary school children is an area of current concern throughout the UK, alongside much discussion surrounding the opportunities and challenges of effecting change…

2402

Abstract

Purpose

Obesity among primary school children is an area of current concern throughout the UK, alongside much discussion surrounding the opportunities and challenges of effecting change. School meals may contribute to obesity, tending to be high in fat and sugar and lacking in essential nutrients. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the success of a healthy eating programme and to examine the work that had been done to identify areas where further work was required, where lessons might be learned for future campaigns and areas where further research would be useful.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study uses a case study approach to examine food provision and education within a primary school in Edinburgh, which adopts a healthy eating programme based on the guidelines of Hungry for Success. Within the case study, both quantitative and qualitative methods were used, including semistructured interviews, recipe analysis and observational research.

Findings

Results indicate some considerable success has been achieved and more ways in which healthy eating can be promoted within the school have been identified. The manner in which change can most effectively be implemented is explored and some indicators for future work highlighted. In addition, results indicate that slow subtle change will be more effective than well intentioned attempts to achieve the ideal in a peremptory manor and that persistence is likely to play a key role.

Research limitations/implications

The study was carried out in one school where the school meals were prepared on an in‐house basis. Nonetheless, looking at ways in which effective change in children's eating habits and food choices can be achieved on a small scale provides some useful pointers for future research with schools where meals are prepared by contract caterers.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on a healthy eating programme.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Marliese Thomas, Dana M. Caudle and Cecilia M. Schmitz

The purpose of this article is to provide a quantitative analysis of the extent to which folksonomies replicate the Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) to see if…

3441

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide a quantitative analysis of the extent to which folksonomies replicate the Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) to see if folksonomies would successfully complement cataloger‐supplied subject headings in library catalogs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper compares social tags and LC subject headings for ten books from various library‐related applications including next generation OPACs and LibraryThing by ranking tags and subject headings using scales modified from research by Golder and Huberman, Voorbij, and Kipp.

Findings

Social tagging does indeed augment LCSH by providing additional access to resources.

Research limitations/implications

Several of our applications lacked tags for the books we chose in our study. Tags are primarily taken from LibraryThing.

Practical implications

A hybrid catalog combining both LCSH and a folksonomy would result in richer metadata and be stronger than the sum of its parts, giving patrons the best of both worlds in terms of access to materials.

Originality/value

This paper supplies quantitative support for the use of folksonomies in a library's catalog. The data also supports many of the previous theories proposed in literature about folksonomies and social tagging.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Tim Tausendfreund, Janneke Metselaar, Jelte Conradie, Maria Helena de Groot, Nicolien Schipaanboord, Jana Knot-Dickscheit, Hans Grietens and Erik J. Knorth

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and application of the KIPP-list of care activities. The acronym KIPP stands for Knowledge and Insight into Primary…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and application of the KIPP-list of care activities. The acronym KIPP stands for Knowledge and Insight into Primary Processes. The instrument is intended as a tool for family coaches to systematically report care activities conducted in the Dutch family support programme Ten for the Future (in Dutch: Tien voor Toekomst).

Design/methodology/approach

The design of the instrument was based on the components of the programme and a literature search for similar instruments used in the Netherlands, complemented by a staff survey. A series of three studies was carried out to test the instrument’s validity and user-friendliness, and to assess its potential for programme evaluation.

Findings

The majority of care activities were performed in cooperation with one or both parents alone, and less frequently with children or external professionals. Although the main focus of the work of the family coaches fell into the categories of “collecting information” and “working towards (behavioural) change” with families, the relatively high frequency of all the types of care contacts emphasises the intensity of this family support programme with a complex target group.

Originality/value

Data gathered with the instrument provided meaningful information by descriptive analysis. KIPP thereby proved its general feasibility in increasing insight into service provision. The instrument can be useful in several stages and on several levels of quality assurance and service optimisation, including reflective practice, supervision, team management and research.

Details

Journal of Children’s Services, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Daniel Martínez-Ávila

This chapter reviews the historical tension between global and local interests in library classifications. More specifically, this chapter presents the concept and characteristics…

Abstract

This chapter reviews the historical tension between global and local interests in library classifications. More specifically, this chapter presents the concept and characteristics of the reader-interest classifications as they were reported in the literature of the past century, including its alleged advantages and detected shortcomings, in order to discuss their presence and consequences in current cases of reader-interest classifications such as BISAC. Following an implicit post-structuralist approach, issues such as the role of standardization and centralization in these projects, the focus and philosophy underlying the construction of these classifications, and the underlying global interests of the book industry are analyzed in order to determine the social consequences and viability of these local classifications. It is concluded that libraries that consider adopting a reader-interesting classification must really think of the interest of the users (in plural) and not only of the global book industry that dominates the development of the standards.

Details

The Organization of Knowledge
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-531-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Li‐Chen Tsai, Sheue‐Ling Hwang and Kuo‐Hao Tang

Expert and novice readers tag documents with different descriptions; this study is intended to discover which readers would generate the most reliable and most representative sets…

1150

Abstract

Purpose

Expert and novice readers tag documents with different descriptions; this study is intended to discover which readers would generate the most reliable and most representative sets of tags.

Design/methodology/approach

One group of experts and one group of novices were recruited. These two groups were asked to provide tags for document bookmarks in a Mozilla Firefox browser. In the experimental analysis we defined two measures – similarity and relevance – to describe the differences between the two groups.

Findings

Tags chosen by experts yielded better similarity and relevance values in all analyses. Tags chosen by the expert group had higher commonality in pairwise similarity analysis; moreover, the relevance analysis showed that tags chosen by experts reflected better understanding of the content.

Originality/value

Tagging behavior has become highly popular on the web, and its study has commercial merit. Tags from experts represent the structure behind the knowledge involved; expert representation may be vastly more helpful than novice representation for promoting understanding of content in an era characterized by an explosion of information.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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