Search results

1 – 10 of over 92000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Kerri Davies and Gemma Honeyman

Families of those with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour often do not receive the practical support, training and information they need. As a result…

Abstract

Purpose

Families of those with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour often do not receive the practical support, training and information they need. As a result living with a child with behaviour described as challenging can be a profoundly hard and isolating experience. This paper aims to discuss the impact of challenging behaviour on families who have a child with intellectual disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The experiences of three families are used to highlight the impact of challenging behaviour and this is supported by existing literature.

Findings

Difficulties families experience include physical and mental health problems, sleep disturbance, social isolation, financial hardship and unemployment. Strategies families use to overcome difficulties are explored including seeking information and practical support and building family resilience. Positive aspects of living with a child whose behaviour is described as challenging is a topic that is often neglected in the academic literature, but caring can result in becoming a stronger family unit, increased personal growth and forming new friendships.

Practical implications

The paper concludes with practical implications for professionals supporting families who live with a child whose behaviour is described as challenging. Families need information, training and practical support to fulfil their caring role effectively while maintaining the wellbeing of the family unit.

Originality/value

The paper stresses that all have a role to play in supporting families, all can make a positive difference, and that people must be more proactive in identifying and meeting the needs of families.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Arpita Agnihotri and Saurabh Bhattacharya

This paper aims to explore drivers of entrepreneurial intentions of working mothers.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore drivers of entrepreneurial intentions of working mothers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a survey-based method using sample of 397 working mothers in India.

Findings

Mothers’ entrepreneurial intention is negatively associated with firms’ perceived family support policies and positively associated with perceived family support. Gains from organization and family support were further enhanced for working mothers’ entrepreneurial intention through the moderating effect of perceived entrepreneurial self-efficacy.

Originality/value

Drivers of entrepreneurship intentions of mothers is scantly explored in past literature. Understanding working mothers’ entrepreneurial intentions could help firms and families provide appropriate environments and opportunities for mothers’ growth.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

María E. Reyes‐Blanes

Compares family sources of support perceived by 55 Puerto Rican mothers of young children with disabilities residing in Puerto Rico with 39 of their counterparts living in…

Abstract

Compares family sources of support perceived by 55 Puerto Rican mothers of young children with disabilities residing in Puerto Rico with 39 of their counterparts living in Florida. Uses the Family Support Scale in the interview process to measure perception. Indicates that the Puerto Rican sample perceive more sources of support than those in Florida. Describes perceived patterns and sources. Discusses the implications for schools, agencies and service providers.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Leslie B. Hammer, Ellen E. Kossek, Kristi Zimmerman and Rachel Daniels

The goal of this chapter is to present new ways of conceptualizing family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and to present a multilevel model reviewing variables…

Abstract

The goal of this chapter is to present new ways of conceptualizing family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and to present a multilevel model reviewing variables that are linked to this construct. We begin the chapter with an overview of the U.S. labor market's rising work–family demands, followed by our multilevel conceptual model of the pathways between FSSB and health, safety, work, and family outcomes for employees. A detailed discussion of the critical role of FSSB is then provided, followed by a discussion of the outcome relationships for employees. We then present our work on the conceptual development of FSSB, drawing from the literature and from focus group data. We end the chapter with a discussion of the practical implications related to our model and conceptual development of FSSB, as well as a discussion of implications for future research.

Details

Exploring the Work and Non-Work Interface
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1444-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Janeal M. McCauley, Kimberly A. Wallet, Molly J. Dahm and Connie S. Ruiz

The focus of the study was to explore the understanding of family among homeless adults in Southeast Texas. We incorporated both qualitative and quantitative methods by…

Abstract

The focus of the study was to explore the understanding of family among homeless adults in Southeast Texas. We incorporated both qualitative and quantitative methods by interviewing two key groups (short-term homeless, long-term homeless) over a 16-week period. Thirty homeless participants were interviewed using 18 questions designed to explore their understanding of family and the social supports that lead to resiliency. Participant ages ranged from 19 to 56 with an average of 44 years. Twenty-six participants were male and four were female. Half of all homeless participants claimed to lack familial support from either biological family or close friends. Among short-term homeless individuals, five of seventeen identified their biological family as fulfilling the role of a traditional family, while among long-term homeless adults, five of thirteen identified their friends as fulfilling the role of a familial unit. A recurring theme emerged in which participants defined family as those individuals who were consistently accessible for support, whether biological relations or non-related friends and companions. As we seek to improve our programs of assistance and advocacy, these findings become important as a step toward honoring our clients and recognizing the validity of their perceived realities as we reconstruct the models by which we facilitate interaction and intervention.

Details

Visions of the 21st Century Family: Transforming Structures and Identities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-028-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined access to and quality of supports for families of adolescents with disabilities.

Methodology

An online survey was completed by family members of transition-aged young adults who had participated in parent training sessions on topics related to transitions to adulthood. Survey responses came from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and 4 U.S. territories.

Findings

More than one-third of families reported unmet information needs related to areas such as employment, housing, preparing for adult relationships, and preparing others to support the family members with disabilities. Families of younger transition-aged youth, youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder or other disabilities, and families with lower household incomes reported more unmet needs. The overall quality of services families reported receiving was 2.19 on a 4-point scale of 1 to 4. Parents reported needing more information and quality of supports related to the transition of youth from school to adulthood.

Practical implications

Given the scope of unmet needs, ongoing collaboration between schools, agencies, organizations, and other entities that serve families is critical. While schools play a key role in supporting the transition process, other organizations also have a role.

Social implications

The results from this survey demonstrate that the need for support is not limited to youth with disabilities, but that family members also have information and support needs related to their roles as caregivers in the transition process.

Originality

This survey provides information about unmet needs and current services from a national sample that includes often underserved populations and includes sufficient numbers of respondents to allow comparisons between families, based on the type of disability their family member had.

Details

Disability and Intersecting Statuses
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-157-1

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Els-Marie Anbäcken, Anna-Lena Almqvist, Carl Johansson, Kazushige Kinugasa, Miho Obata, Jinhee Hyun, Jinsook Lee and Young Joon Park

Purpose: The aim is to explore how family relations are affected by societal changes in relation to informal and formal caregiving and self-determination of older adults.…

Abstract

Purpose: The aim is to explore how family relations are affected by societal changes in relation to informal and formal caregiving and self-determination of older adults.

Design/methodology/approach: Care managers (CMs)/social workers (SWs) (N = 124) participated in a comparative vignette study including Japan, South Korea, and Sweden. Systems theory was used.

Findings: Japanese CMs/SWs clearly describe their efforts to create networks in a relational way between formal and informal actors in the community. South Korean CMs/SWs balance between suggesting interventions to support daily life at home or a move to a nursing home, often acknowledging the family as the main caregiver. In Sweden, CMs/SWs highlight the juridical element in meeting the older adult and the interventions offered, and families primarily give social support. Regarding self-determination, the Japanese priority is for CMs/SWs to harmonize within the family and the community. South Korean CMs/SWs express ambivalent attitudes to older adults’ capability for self-determination in the intersection between formal and family care. Swedish CMs/SWs adhere to the older adult’s self-determination, while acknowledging the role of the family in persuading the older adult to accept interventions. The results suggest emerging defamilialization in South Korea, while tendencies to refamilialization are noticed in Japan and Sweden, albeit in different ways.

Research limitations/implications: In translation, nuances may be lost. A focus on changing families shows that country-specific details in care services have been reduced. For future research, perspectives of “care” need to be studied on different levels.

Originality/value: Using one vignette in three countries with different welfare regimes, discussing changing views on families’, communities’ and societal caregiving is unique. This captures changes in policy, influencing re- and defamilialization.

Details

Aging and the Family: Understanding Changes in Structural and Relationship Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-491-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

René Moelker, Gabriëlla Poot, Manon Andres, Ljubica Jelušič, Jelena Juvan, Leena Parmar and Maren Tomforde

In this study the question is raised how family support should be organized so that it is as efficient and effective as can be. Exchange theory can provide an answer to…

Abstract

In this study the question is raised how family support should be organized so that it is as efficient and effective as can be. Exchange theory can provide an answer to this question while taking into account that the needs of individuals will differ. In the study that is presented here, generalized reciprocity is the key concept that is derived from exchange theory. All support systems, in the seven countries under study, have benefited somehow from generalized reciprocity. However, what is effective and efficient support in the perception of one individual will differ from someone else's, and also, support systems that are effective and efficient in country X will not be so in country Y. Even though benefiting from generalized reciprocity, in the end the support system has to be matched to the support arrangement, arriving at different solutions in different countries.

Details

Armed Forces and Conflict Resolution: Sociological Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-8485-5122-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Nguyen Huu Minh and Phan Thi Mai Huong

Purpose: To explore emotional support, daily housework assistance, and economic support for older adults provided by the Vietnamese family within the context of the…

Abstract

Purpose: To explore emotional support, daily housework assistance, and economic support for older adults provided by the Vietnamese family within the context of the impacts of socio-economic, demographic, and other factors.

Methodology: (1) The researchers used data from censuses taken from 1989 to 2019; national surveys of Internal Migration, Labor and Employment and other topics; and recent large sample sociological surveys (2) adapted a modified Diamond Care Model (Ochiai, 2009) to analyze effects of the characteristics of older adults; and of the country’s laws, policies, and socio-economic changes, on the families’ caregiving activities supporting the older adults.

Findings: The family is still the most important institution providing care for older adults in Viet Nam. Most older people live with their children and see this as an age-old security solution despite differences related to lifestyles and interests. However, when the average number of working-age people per older person decreases, as older adults live longer, household sizes are smaller, and there is increased large migration, the demand for non-family caregiving for older adults will increase. Since social services to help meet this demand are limited, the traditional family support system for the elderly in Viet Nam will face many challenges as families try to assure the quality of care needed in the very near future.

Value: This chapter shows systematically a relationship between elderly care in the Vietnamese family and socio-economic, demographic, and associated factors based on comprehensive data sources. The results can help us think about how to create an appropriate future model for taking care of older adults in Viet Nam that combines the efforts of families and the support of comprehensive social policies by the community.

Details

Aging and the Family: Understanding Changes in Structural and Relationship Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-491-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Neena Gopalan, Murugan Pattusamy and Kamala Gollakota

Numerous studies on Western samples exist on work–family conflict (WFC) and work–family enrichment (WFE). Generalizing such results to other cultures may lead to erroneous…

Abstract

Purpose

Numerous studies on Western samples exist on work–family conflict (WFC) and work–family enrichment (WFE). Generalizing such results to other cultures may lead to erroneous interpretations of results. The present study emphasizes the role of different types of support on both work–family conflict and enrichment among university faculty in India.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was administered to university faculty in India. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results based on a sample of 199 university faculty in India indicated that supervisor and coworker support did not significantly reduce work–family conflict but increased work–family enrichment. The type of family support (instrumental versus emotional) had an impact, particularly on work-family enrichment.

Originality/value

Research on work–family dynamics in India is still in its nascent stage. This study attempted to address this gap by studying both conflict and enrichment dynamics in the family and work lives of university faculty in India.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 92000