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1 – 10 of 58
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2023

Debbie Tolson, Louise Ritchie, Michael Smith, Margaret Mullen Brown and Steven Tolson

This paper aims to examine housing need for older people and people with dementia, with reference to Scotland. This paper also examines policy responses and tensions arising from…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine housing need for older people and people with dementia, with reference to Scotland. This paper also examines policy responses and tensions arising from such need and looks critically at the evidence of care needs and what older people want in relation to later life conditions, including dementia.

Design/methodology/approach

Taking the Being Home: Housing and Dementia in Scotland report (2017) as a baseline descriptor, the authors have collated evidence from a range of sources to help them examine what has changed in terms of policy, practice and population ageing. Set against this backdrop, using desk-based analytical methods, the authors interrogate existing planning processes and systems in Scotland.

Findings

Scottish Spatial Planning has a policy blindness on the overwhelming evidence of the housing needs derived from an ageing population. Policy focus is geared towards the amount of housing supplied, rather than appropriate types of housing, leaving older people with little choice of suitable accommodation. A key area to improve is in establishing greater co-operation and policy synthesis between health, social, housing and planning functions. Broad policy ambition must be transferred into detailed reality for older people and people with dementia to benefit.

Originality/value

The integrated approach and in-depth analysis, linked to planning policy and housing need, is highly original and much needed.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Louise Ritchie, Anna Jack-Waugh, Elsa Sanatombi Devi, Binil V, Anice George, Joyce Henry, Clarita Shynal Martis, Debjani Gangopadhyay and Debbie Tolson

Many individual and family hardships are associated with poorly understood palliative care needs arising from advanced dementia within India. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Many individual and family hardships are associated with poorly understood palliative care needs arising from advanced dementia within India. The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of people in India affected by advanced dementia and to shape educational approaches for practitioners and the local community.

Design/methodology/approach

Three focus groups with family carers of people (n = 27) with advanced dementia were undertaken with local communities in South India. One focus group was carried out in English and two in the local language (Kannada) and translated to English.

Findings

The findings of the focus groups are presented in four themes, conditions of caring, intersecting vulnerabilities, desperate acts of care and awareness of education and training needs. These themes highlight the challenges faced by family carers of people with advanced dementia and describe the potential harm, abuse and poor mental well-being facing both the person with dementia and the family carer as a result of their situation.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to explore ways to ensure inclusivity and sensitivity in the research process and enable equal participation from all participants.

Practical implications

The findings highlight a lack of support for family carers of people with advanced dementia and demonstrate the need for dementia-specific integrated and palliative care approaches in India.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight into the experiences and challenges facing family caregivers of people living with advanced dementia in India to shape practitioner education in a way that will underpin effective dementia-specific palliation and integrated services.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Louise Ritchie, Pauline Banks, Michael Danson, Debbie Tolson and Fiona Borrowman

Recent changes affecting state pension age, and earlier diagnosis, will result in more people with dementia in employment. The purpose of this paper is to establish the nature of…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent changes affecting state pension age, and earlier diagnosis, will result in more people with dementia in employment. The purpose of this paper is to establish the nature of support that would enable/enables people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment to continue employment post diagnosis.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrative review was carried out supported by information derived from a thematic analysis of data from interviews with seven relatives supporting a younger person with dementia and one person with dementia.

Findings

Six papers were identified for inclusion in the review. Findings from the published papers and interviews indicated that work is a significant issue for people with dementia highlighting problems with job retention, work performance and the impact of diagnosis.

Research limitations/implications

The review highlighted a dearth of high-quality research in the area. Although employment was not the main focus of the interviews, the extracts highlight some of the challenges that face people who develop dementia while of working age, their families, and employers.

Practical implications

Vocational rehabilitation is primarily carried out by allied health professionals; however, there is a lack of research evidence relating to people with dementia in the workplace. Further research is needed in order to inform future practice.

Social implications

Loss of employment deprives families of financial security and employers of a skilled employee.

Originality/value

This is the first review to focus on dementia in employment, providing a starting point on which to base future research in this area.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

R. Way‐Clark, D. Good, J. Ritchie, L. Nadeau and M. Renaud

Taken and adapted from an article by the Determinants of Health working group of the National Forum on Health. Discusses people’s ideas about health and healthcare and their views…

998

Abstract

Taken and adapted from an article by the Determinants of Health working group of the National Forum on Health. Discusses people’s ideas about health and healthcare and their views on medicare.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-0756

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

John Z. Ni, Steve A. Melnyk, William J. Ritchie and Barbara F. Flynn

The purpose of this paper is to focus on adoption of certified management standards, specifically public standards. Such standards play an increasingly important role in today’s…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on adoption of certified management standards, specifically public standards. Such standards play an increasingly important role in today’s business environment. However, to generate adoption benefits, they must be first widely accepted – a situation where they have become viewed as the de facto norms. For this state to occur early adopters play a critical role. Past research has argued that early adopters, in exchange for assuming more risk, are rewarded with higher economic returns. Yet, these findings are based on private, not public standards. With public standards, early adopters do not receive such benefits. There is evidence that public standards are becoming more important. This situation leads to a simple but important question addressed in this study – if early adopters assume the risks of embracing a new public standard without economic benefits, then what is their motivation? To resolve this question, this study draws on agency theory and prospect theory. The authors argue that early adopters embrace such standards because of their desire to minimize risk resulting from failure to support the goal at the heart of the public standards.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from the Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) Partners Cost Benefit Survey and analyzed through structural equation modeling.

Findings

Early adopters of public standards are not driven by economic benefits but rather by the need to minimize their exposure to the risks associated with failing to satisfy the goals associated with a public standard. In other words, they were motivated by the need to minimize costs. In the case of C-TPAT, these costs are those of failing to provide or improve network security.

Research limitations/implications

This study has shed new light on the standards adoption process by clarifying the specific motivations that drive early adoption of a public standard. In addition to identifying the loss aversion motives of early adopters and economic benefit motives of later adopters, the authors have also elaborated on the notion that standards have differing levels of precedence, particularly when comparing private with public standards.

Practical implications

In a world characterized by increasing demands for outcomes such as improved security and where governmental funding is falling, due to growing deficits and governments that are becoming more conservative, the authors expect the use of public standards to increase.

Originality/value

Different from prior research on private standard, the paper focuses on the organizations involved in the adoption and diffusion of a public standard, with special attention being devoted to the early adopters. The paper provides a theoretical explanation for the actions of early adopters of a public standard through the theoretical lens of prospect theory.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Gérard Richez

The Banff National Park is the most famous of Canada. The development of the recent years has been considered as to fast and to massive. The author analyses the key factors of…

Abstract

The Banff National Park is the most famous of Canada. The development of the recent years has been considered as to fast and to massive. The author analyses the key factors of success of the park development. He describes the new strategic park policy which takes into account the carrying capacity and the protection of the great nature and landscape.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 55 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Chiara Pomare, Kate Churruca, Janet C. Long, Louise A. Ellis and Jeffrey Braithwaite

Hospitals are constantly redeveloping to improve functioning and modernise the delivery of safe and high-quality care. In Australia, it is expected that different stakeholders…

Abstract

Purpose

Hospitals are constantly redeveloping to improve functioning and modernise the delivery of safe and high-quality care. In Australia, it is expected that different stakeholders have the opportunity to contribute to the design and planning of hospital redevelopment projects. The purpose of this study is to examine the potential for misalignment between policy (“work as imagined”) and staff experiences of a hospital redevelopment (“work as done”).

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of a large Australian hospital in a capital city undergoing redevelopment. Forty-six semi-structured interviews were conducted with hospital staff. Staff experiences were identified in corroboration with additional data: key-informant discussions with members of the hospital executive; document analysis (e.g. hospital and government documents) and survey responses about experiences of the hospital redevelopment.

Findings

A disjuncture was identified between policy and the experiences of hospital staff. Over one in every three (36.0%) staff felt uninformed about the redevelopment and 79.4% were not involved in decisions throughout the process of design and redevelopment, which contradicted the procedure laid out in policy for hospital development.

Originality/value

Despite the seemingly “good news story” of allocating billions of dollars to redeveloping and modernising health services in Australia, the experiences of staff on the front lines suggest a lack of consultation. Rectifying these concerns may be integral to avoid fragmentation during the challenging circumstances of hospital redevelopment.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Holly Louise Crossen-White, Ann Hemingway, Adele Ladkin, Andrew Jones, Amanda Burke and Olaf Timmermans

This paper aims to present the feasibility study findings from a four-year project funded by the European Union Commission (the SAIL project, Staying Active and Independent for…

112

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the feasibility study findings from a four-year project funded by the European Union Commission (the SAIL project, Staying Active and Independent for Longer). The funding stream was Interreg 2Seas which offers opportunities for coastal areas on both sides of the English Channel to work together on complex practical issues. The project focused on enabling older people to stay active and independent for longer using social innovation (co-production) approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten pilot projects were developed, and each of the pilots worked with an academic partner to undertake a feasibility study that included 10 pilots across the four countries involved, France, Belgium, Holland and England.

Findings

This paper presents barriers and facilitators (using logic models) to the social innovation process with older people, which has wider relevance in terms of social innovation and its application.

Research limitations/implications

The findings which inform this paper are extensive, and this is a longitudinal qualitative study with much of the data collection being done using an online wiki (complemented by interviews and documentary analysis) which is a relatively new method for data collection. However, the consistency of the findings when analysed by three researchers was clear and pragmatically this complex method was required to examine complexity in the process of implementing social innovation in practice.

Practical implications

This project has enabled greater understanding of how social innovation can be applied and has highlighted contextual issues that can undermine or enable attempts to adopt the approach.

Social implications

For the 10 pilot projects generated, there were obviously important cultural and geographical differences in terms of engagement and practical implementation of social innovation. Some of which, as mentioned in this paper, are very important for the successful implementation of social innovation in a particular setting and indeed may be a strength or a barrier in terms of engaging with local people and agencies.

Originality/value

The development of logic models is a useful approach when the topic under study is complex and likely to produce a diverse set of process outcomes. The logic model focuses upon the relationships between the resources that are used to create the intervention and what is produced in terms of outcomes. Ultimately, this enables the identification of the factors that contribute to a successful intervention. Thus, in relation to this study, logic models have helped to provide an evidence-based framework that can support decision-making regarding the most effective use of limited resources to support successful social innovation processes in the future. The logic model for each area of the findings presented here can in the future be used to help implement social innovation; also, to consider how it can be improved in future research.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 August 2019

Richard Tresidder and Emmie Louise Deakin

The purpose of this paper is to identify the role that the creative re-use of historic buildings can play in the future development of the experiences economy. The aesthetic…

3411

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the role that the creative re-use of historic buildings can play in the future development of the experiences economy. The aesthetic attributes and the imbued historic connotation associated with the building help create unique and extraordinary “experiencescapes” within the contemporary tourism and hospitality industries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a conceptual insight into the creative re-use of historic buildings in the tourism and hospitality sectors, the work draws on two examples of re-use in the UK.

Findings

This work demonstrates how the creative re-use of historic buildings can help create experiences that are differentiated from the mainstream hospitality experiences. It also identifies that it adds an addition unquantifiable element that enables the shift to take place from servicescape to experiencescape.

Originality/value

There has been an ongoing debate as to the significance of heritage in hospitality and tourism. However, this paper provides an insight into how the practical re-use of buildings can help companies both benefit from and contribute to the experiences economy.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Karen Fitzgerald and Louise Biddle

Improving early diagnosis of cancer through system change initiatives is endemic in England’s NHS cancer services. These initiatives, however, often fail to gain traction due to…

1670

Abstract

Purpose

Improving early diagnosis of cancer through system change initiatives is endemic in England’s NHS cancer services. These initiatives, however, often fail to gain traction due to the complexities of health system structures. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether using a change framework grounded in systems thinking could be of help to system leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

A portfolio of geographically independent projects, all implementing cancer service changes as part of the Accelerate, Coordinate, Evaluate Programme, was used for the study. Eight projects were purposively selected to give a varied case-mix. Two semi-structured interviews were conducted with each project. Analysis of interviews was carried out using the Framework Method.

Findings

Processes working for (growth processes) and against (limiting processes) change were evident in and common across all eight projects. Projects commonly encountered challenges of relevance, time and bounded thinking. Having a network of committed people was vital for both initiating and sustaining change. Furthermore, understanding stakeholders’ emotional responses to change helped mitigate emergent challenges.

Practical implications

Leaders should pay constant attention to the dynamics of change, taking time to anticipate and diffuse challenges whilst simultaneously working to create the conditions that help change flourish. A change framework rooted in complex systems theory can help leaders understand the contradictory and non-linear processes inherent in transformational change.

Originality/value

Few studies seek to understand change dynamics by comparing the experiences of separate change initiatives implemented contemporaneously. The findings offer leaders practical insights on how to implement transformation.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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