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1 – 10 of over 113000
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Sarah Paynter and Christine Rivers

The purpose of this paper is to examine the surrounding attitudes, culture and workplace environment in which Oxleas NHS Foundation trust developed a network for staff

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the surrounding attitudes, culture and workplace environment in which Oxleas NHS Foundation trust developed a network for staff with lived experience of mental ill health.

Design/methodology/approach

Sarah Paynter completed an interview talking about her experiences with a peer, which was recorded, then the authors picked out relevant themes from this which are grounded in lived experience. The paper examines the theme of lived experience in the workplace in more depth, from a personal perspective (Sarah) and from an organisational perspective (Christine).

Findings

There is a lack of dialogue about staff lived experience of mental ill health within the workplace. There are compelling reasons from both the perspective of the organisation and staff with lived experience for setting up a lived experience staff network. The authors note that increased dialogue and visibility has added value on both sides.

Originality/value

This is a relatively new initiative in the NHS, and particularly in mental health trusts. The authors speak from their experiences in Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust. This is of value to organisations looking to start dialogue and therefore improve the experiences of staff and the quality of the organisation.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Jennifer Marie Hadden, Susan Thomas, Lorna Jellicoe-Jones and Zoe Marsh

– The purpose of this paper is to explore staff and prisoner experiences of a newly implemented Personality Disorder Service (PDS) within a category B male establishment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore staff and prisoner experiences of a newly implemented Personality Disorder Service (PDS) within a category B male establishment.

Design/methodology/approach

A semi-structured interview was used to explore the experiences of seven male category B PDS prisoners and eight PDS members of staff (four National Health Service (NHS) clinical staff and four prison service staff) from a multi-disciplinary team (MDT). Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was completed.

Findings

Prisoner sample: one overarching theme “environment” organised two themes: “enabling factors” and “disabling factors” which had a subtheme “integrating men who have sexually offended onto the unit”. Another theme “opportunities for self-development” was identified. Staff sample: an overarching theme “environment” organised two themes: “enabling factors” and “disabling factors”. An overarching theme “multi-disciplinary working” organised two themes: “working in partnership” and “cultural differences in working practices”. Two further themes were: “professional development” and “stressors”.

Research limitations/implications

This study focused on a small sample of staff and prisoners and their experiences of a newly implemented PDS. In addition, both staff and prisoners volunteered to take part in the study, and therefore may not be a representative sample. Consequently the results cannot be generalised to other establishments or PD services.

Practical implications

Staff and prisoner experiences indicate that a multi-disciplinary approach to personality disorder services is desirable and can be effective. Prisoners are gaining experiences of positive therapeutic relationships with staff and hope that their experiences of the PDS will reduce their risk of reoffending. Staff experiences indicate that the integration of two services presents challenges and that they are working to overcome these. It may be advantageous for the impact of cultural differences within a MDT to be explored further.

Originality/value

This is the first study that explores the experiences of the MDT and prisoners of the newly implemented PDS. The PDS forms part of the new development under the National Offender personality disorder pathway.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2022

Esther Ogundipe, Knut Tore Sælør and Stian Biong

This study aims to explore and describe staff working in a Norwegian supportive housing site’s experiences with promoting social community participation for residents with…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore and describe staff working in a Norwegian supportive housing site’s experiences with promoting social community participation for residents with co-occurring problems. The research question addressed was: how does residential support staff experience promoting social community participation for residents with co-occurring problems?

Design/methodology/approach

Nine residential support staff participated in qualitative interviews. All interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were analysed using Braun and Clarke's approach to thematic analysis.

Findings

The analysis process resulted in two themes: “It is all about economics” and “Who will pay for it?”

Practical implications

Regarding the Nordic welfare system, the need for a redistribution of financial resources in health services is discussed. The authors recommend that further studies explore people outside the regular health-care system perspectives on how they can contribute to making community inclusion a reality for persons experiencing co-occurring problems.

Originality

This study provides a nuanced understanding of how financial resources can impede or support efforts and opportunities to promote community inclusion for residents experiencing co-occurring problems.

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Rebecca Hargate, Sharon Howden, Emma Tarpey and Tammi Walker

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of both staff and patients in a medium-secure mental health unit of the self-harm and/or suicidal behaviour of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of both staff and patients in a medium-secure mental health unit of the self-harm and/or suicidal behaviour of others. Suicide and self-harm is highly prevalent in forensic settings and evidence suggests that experiencing other people’s self-harm and suicidal behaviour can lead to negative outcomes, both for staff and patients. This is particularly important in hospitals where patients are highly dependent on staff for support.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with five staff members and six patients in a medium-secure male mental health unit in the North of England. Data were analysed following interpretative phenomenological analysis guidelines.

Findings

Three dominant themes were identified during analysis: the impact of suicide and self-harm; the role of others; and the importance of understanding and experience. Various impacts were discussed including desensitization, negative emotions and the desire to help. Other people played an important role in protecting against negative impacts, with shared experiences and peer support reported as the biggest benefits. Experiences of self-harm and suicide were found to increase understanding resulting in more positive attitudes. Additionally, the importance of training and education was highlighted.

Originality/value

This paper provides an insight into the experiences of staff and patients in medium-secure male mental health unit, which has benefits to practitioners when considering support mechanisms.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Adrian Heng Tsai Tan, Birgit Muskat and Raechel Johns

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of empathy in the student service experience. Taking a dyadic perspective, both students’ and staff’s perceptions are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of empathy in the student service experience. Taking a dyadic perspective, both students’ and staff’s perceptions are analyzed to determine if empathy matters to both actors alike; and which differences in perceptions about the role of empathy between these actors exist.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt a multi-method approach and used data from 256 usable survey responses from 11 higher education service providers in Singapore. Empathy was operationalized by six cognitive and affective independent variables and multiple multivariate analyses are applied, such as multivariate analysis of variance, discriminant analysis and multiple regression analysis.

Findings

Results show that both students and staff alike evaluate empathy as important in the co-created service experience. The provision of individualized attention to students to positively influence student experience in learning was deemed important by both staff and students. Yet, there are also distinct differences. For students, it is essential that staff members have students’ best interests at heart; for staff members, knowledge of students’ needs and show of care and concern are important.

Practical implications

Students and staff perceive empathy in higher education service provision differently. Interestingly, whilst staff think caring for students is important, students feel that too much care and concern from staff has a negative effect on their experience. Hence, too much care and concern might cause potential issues with the students’ perception of “over-servicing” which might manifest as “spoon-feeding.” Instead, students are asking for individualized and professionalized attention to be taken seriously and to be involved in the co-creation of the education service experience.

Originality/value

This study advances the understanding of affective and cognitive aspects of empathy and their influence on students’ service experiences.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business…

Abstract

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business activities in which the firms are engaged are outlined to provide background information for the reader.

Details

Reputation Building, Website Disclosure and the Case of Intellectual Capital
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-506-9

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Mohsen Shafie Nikabadi and Delshad Hoseini

The production of a good or service requires that the supplier performs a wide range of activities. Many companies are trying to fit outsourcing with the dimensions of…

Abstract

Purpose

The production of a good or service requires that the supplier performs a wide range of activities. Many companies are trying to fit outsourcing with the dimensions of their organization. Outsourcing is increasingly being used among Iranian companies in the field of the electric power industry. Human resources are among the factors that consider outsourcing as an obstacle for their growth because staffs declare that the development of outsourcing is a serious threat for unemployment of them and ultimately expulsion from work. Thus, this study surveys the dynamic effects of human resources and work experience on outsourcing decisions. This paper aims to propose a model for dynamic strategic outsourcing focusing on human resource and work experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Presenting a model for strategic outsourcing can help organizations to resolve their outsourcing problems. The data needed for examining the dynamic impact of human resources and work experience on outsourcing have been compiled using library and field studies. The method used in this study is an integrated approach, so the model could consider the general effects of manpower and present a systematic view. After interviewing with experts in power industry, the causal relationships of the variables were determined, and a dynamic model based on the applications of the dynamic system was developed in VENSIM software. The research model will be completed in a three-year period (2016-2019) in the power industry of Iran.

Findings

For completing projects in an organization, cooperation between internal employees and external contractors is needed; thus, results based on both external contractors and internal staff have shown that outsourcing through working of a number of contractors will be more effective than frequent use of one contractor. On the other hand, improving the quality of projects could be done by training new employees using skilled and expert employees.

Originality/value

Existence of one-dimensional models (only with qualitative factors or only with quantitative factors) in the context of outsourcing in the past studies has prompted to study different types of factors together as a dynamic model. This paper presents a quantitative and qualitative model in the field of strategic outsourcing with emphasis on human resources and work experience. In the past studies, there was no way to formulate the qualitative factors, and they simply used the data from the organization, and the only formulation in their works was based on quantitative factors. But in this study, both factors with dynamic modeling have been formulated.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Odd Lindberg

Women represent approximately 6% of the prison population of Sweden (total ‐ 5000). This article presents a study of female inmates in the closed prison for women…

Abstract

Women represent approximately 6% of the prison population of Sweden (total ‐ 5000). This article presents a study of female inmates in the closed prison for women, Hinseberg, in Sweden. The study examines the inmates and staff culture on the basis of concepts such as interaction rituals, status, role conflicts and social representations. The methodology included questionnaires to all inmates, qualitative interviews with inmates and staff and observation within the prison. Among the findings, it was clear that some inmates have a higher status than others, which is linked to the type of crime committed, years of imprisonment, previous imprisonment, relations to male gang members, and charisma. So‐called ‘Queens’ rule the wings and maintain the inmates’ codes. Examples of these codes are: do not associate with the staff, do not talk too long with staff, do not be an informer, do not seek treatment programmes, and do not trust anybody. Those who challenge the codes are seen as an informer or traitor, and the culture in the prison was found to be oppressive towards women who want to seek treatment and support from staff. The study also shows that there are similarities in the staff and the inmates’ cultures. Experienced prison officers often have a significant impact on the staff culture, and among staff there are informal codes, i.e. that you should not be ‘too close’ to the inmates and do not trust the inmates. This leads to an objectifying and distancing approach in relation to the inmates. In both cultures stereotypical social representations of ‘the other’ is created, which have a negative impact on the possibilities for working with rehabilitation.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 1 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Janet R McColl-Kennedy, Lilliemay Cheung and Elizabeth Ferrier

The purpose of this paper is threefold: to introduce a practice-based framework designed to integrate and deepen our understanding of how individuals co-create service…

5071

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold: to introduce a practice-based framework designed to integrate and deepen our understanding of how individuals co-create service experience practices; to identify co-creating service experience practices; and to provide a compelling agenda for future research, and offer practical strategies to enhance co-created service experiences. Accordingly, we extend practice theory, building on Kjellberg and Helgesson’s (2006) practice-based framework for markets by integrating Holt’s (1995) consumer practices and social capital-based practices (Gittell and Vidal, 1998; Woolcock, 2001).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors interpretive analysis draws on naturalistic observations carried out over 18 months, supplemented with 35 interviews (17 with residents, and 18 with staff) and a diary study of nine non-management staff (including nursing staff, kitchen and cleaning staff and administrative staff) at a residential aged care facility.

Findings

This paper offers a new conceptualization of service experience. Rather than viewing service experiences as dyadic, designed and produced by the firm for the customer, the authors conceptualize service experience as dynamic, experiential, relational activities and interactions, thus highlighting the collective, collaborative, evolving and dynamic nature of service experience.

Research limitations/implications

Building on McColl-Kennedy et al.’s (2012) foundational work, the authors articulate three distinct types of practices that characterize service experiences. We extend practice theory offering an integrative practice-based framework consistent with our practice-based conceptualization of service experience. Based on the service ecosystem metaphor and drawing parallels and contrasts with an ant colony, the authors provide a co-created service experience practices (CSEP) framework comprising: representational practices – assimilating, producing and personalizing; normalizing practices – bonding, bridging and linking; and exchange practices – accounting (searching and selecting), evaluating (sorting and assorting), appreciating, classifying (displaying objects and demonstrating collective action, and play (communing and entertaining). Our CSEP framework integrates three theoretical frameworks, that of Kjellberg and Helgesson’s (2006) market practices framework, Holt’s (1995) consumer practices and social capital-based practices (Gittell and Vidal, 1998; Woolcock, 2001), to yield a deeper explanation of co-created service experience practices.

Practical implications

It is clear from our observations, interviews with residents and staff, and from the diary study, that customers co-create service experiences in many different ways, each contextually determined. In some cases the customers are well equipped with a wide array of resources, integrated from exchanges with other customers, staff, friends and family and from their own resources. In other cases, however, few resources are integrated from few sources. Importantly, the authors found that some staff are willing and able to offer an extensive range of resources designed to complement the customers’ own resources to help facilitate the service experience. We offer a seven-point practical plan designed to enhance service experiences.

Originality/value

The authors work contributes theoretically and practically in four important ways. First, the authors provide a critical analysis of prior service experience conceptualizations. Second, consistent with the conceptualization that service experiences are dynamic, experiential, relational activities and interactions developed with the customer and potentially other actors, including for example, other customers, organizations, and friends and family, we draw parallels and contrasts with a biological ecosystem and offer a co-created service experience practices (CSEP) framework designed to integrate and deepen the understanding of co-created service experiences and extend practice theory. Third, the authors provide managerial implications, including a seven-point practical plan. Finally, the authors offer a research agenda to assist further theory development.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2011

Dan Riley, Deirdre J. Duncan and John Edwards

The purpose of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of staff bullying in Australian schools, to identify bullies and targets and to examine some implications for…

3480

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of staff bullying in Australian schools, to identify bullies and targets and to examine some implications for school leaders in dealing with staff bullying.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative research design survey instrument contained 11 demographic items, 44 questions of bullying experience, two lists of possible bullies and targets, plus three open‐ended questions.

Findings

Data revealed that 99.6 per cent of respondents had experienced some form of bullying during their employment. Half the respondents experienced 32 or more of the 44 listed survey items, while their health was adversely affected by persistent and frequent bullying.

Practical implications

The research revealed the existence of workplace bullying in Australian schools and some obvious implications for leadership. It profiled the experiences of respondents and identified strategies to eliminate or reduce bullying in Australian schools.

Originality/value

The exploratory study was the first national online survey into staff bullying in Australian schools.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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