Search results

1 – 3 of 3
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Maria Nnyepi, Maurice R. Bennink, Jose Jackson-Malete, Sumathi Venkatesh, Leapetswe Malete, Lucky Mokgatlhe, Philemon Lyoka, Gabriel M. Anabwani, Jerry Makhanda and Lorraine J. Weatherspoon

Identifying and addressing poor nutritional status in school-aged children is often not prioritized relative to HIV/AIDS treatment. The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Identifying and addressing poor nutritional status in school-aged children is often not prioritized relative to HIV/AIDS treatment. The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the benefits of integrating nutrition (assessment and culturally acceptable food supplement intervention) in the treatment strategy for this target group.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a randomized, double blind pre-/post-intervention trial with 201 HIV-positive children (six to 15 years) in Botswana. Eligibility included CD4 cell counts < 700/mm3 (a marker for the severity of HIV infection), documented treatment with antiretroviral (ARV) drugs, and no reported evidence of taking supplemental food products with one or more added nutrients in the six-month period prior to the study. The intervention (12 months) consisted of two food supplements for ethical reason, one with a higher protein content, bean (bean-sorghum based) group (n=97) and a cereal (sorghum) group (n=104) both of which contained added energy- and micro- nutrients. Anthropometric and biochemical nutritional status indicators (stunting, wasting, underweight, skinfolds for fat and muscle protein reserves, and hemoglobin levels) were compared within and between the bean and the cereal groups pre- and post-intervention separately for children six to nine years and ten to 15 years.

Findings

Older children (ten to 15 years) fared worse overall compared to those who were younger (six to nine years) children in anthropometric and protein status indicators both at baseline and post-intervention. Among children six to nine years, the mid arm circumference and blood hemoglobin levels improved significantly in both the bean and cereal groups (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively). Although the BMI for age z-score and the triceps skinfold decreased significantly in the bean group, the post-intervention subscapular skinfold (fat stores) was significantly higher for the bean group compared to the cereal group (p < 0.05). Among children ten to 15 years, both the bean and the cereal groups also showed improvement in mid arm circumference (p < 0.001), but only those in the bean group showed improvement in hemoglobin (p < 0.01) post-intervention.

Originality/value

Similar significant nutritional status findings and trends were found for both food interventions and age within group pre- vs post-comparisons, except hemoglobin in the older children. Post-intervention hemoglobin levels for the type food supplement was higher for the “bean” vs the “cereal” food in the younger age group. The fact that all children, but especially those who were older were in poor nutritional status supports the need for nutrition intervention in conjunction with ARV treatment in children with HIV/AIDS, perhaps using a scaled up future approach to enhance desired outcomes.

Details

Health Education, vol. 115 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Hye-Jin Paek, Elizabeth Taylor Quilliam, Sookyong Kim, Lorraine J. Weatherspoon, Nora J. Rifon and Mira Lee

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the content of food advergames and the nutritional quality of foods promoted in those advergames with the presence of child visitors…

2258

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the content of food advergames and the nutritional quality of foods promoted in those advergames with the presence of child visitors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study integrates three different sources of data, first, characteristics of the audience from internet audience measurement metrics; second, an analysis of food advergame content; and third, an analysis of the dietary quality of the foods in advergames.

Findings

The results show that 83.2 percent of the total 143 advergames are sponsored by CFBAI participating companies and 79.5 percent of the total 44 advergames reaching children are sponsored by those companies. About 87 percent of the advergames reaching children do not include age limit specification. By contrast, about 71 percent of the advergames reaching children include ad breaks and about half of the advergames reaching children include healthy lifestyle information. Compared to the total, advergames reaching children seem to have a higher level of brand integration. Moreover, most foods that the advergames promote are classified as unhealthy. Finally, the results show that ad breaks and number of brand identifiers are the two significant predictors of food advergames with child unique visitors.

Originality/value

Despite the increased attention to and scrutiny of innovative and interactive food marketing targeting children, little is known about the extent to which such techniques actually reach children, nor about the content and nutritional quality of foods they promote. This study attempts to fill in the gap by focussing on food advergames.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2013

Jose Candace Jackson, Lorraine Weatherspoon, Maria Nnyepi, Leapetswe Malete, Lucky Mokgatlhe, Philemon Lyoka and Maurice Bennink

The purpose of this paper is to study the quality of porridge made from cereal legume composite flour and to compare with a porridge that it is traditionally eaten.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the quality of porridge made from cereal legume composite flour and to compare with a porridge that it is traditionally eaten.

Design/methodology/approach

The nutritional composition as well as protein, microbiological, and sensory quality of porridge from a sorghum bean composite flour was assessed and compared with sorghum porridge (SP) that is traditionally eaten in Botswana.

Findings

Results indicated that the nutrient composition and the protein quality of the sorghum bean composite porridge were significantly higher than that of the SP. The majority of children and adults rated the sensory attributes of the sorghum composite porridge highly and adult consumers indicated willingness to buy it.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates that using traditionally consumed foods, which are culturally acceptable and low cost, such as sorghum and sugar beans, can improve nutritional and sensory attributes when composited. These composited foods can then be recommended as a sustainable supplementary food source to improve the nutritional status and health of vulnerable populations such as HIV+ children.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

1 – 3 of 3