Search results

1 – 10 of 284
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Nourhen Sallemi, Rim Zouari Hadiji and Ghazi Zouari

This paper aims to examine the effect of governance mechanisms (board size, board independence, duality, the Sharia board size, Sharia board meetings and ownership…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of governance mechanisms (board size, board independence, duality, the Sharia board size, Sharia board meetings and ownership concentration) on the performance of insurance providers of distinguishable Muamalah contracts (wakalah and hybrid), moderated by the length of senior leaders’ servicing time.

Design/methodology/approach

The full sample includes 21 listed Takaful companies divided into two subsamples – 12 insurance wakalah contracts offered in the South East Asian (SEA) countries and 9 insurance hybrid contracts offered in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries over the period of 2012–2018. The methodology is informed by Baron and Kenny’s (1986) moderation process approach.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that the larger the size of directors’ board and the higher the number of outside directors, the greater the SEA wakalah Takaful insurance performance. Nondual functions and a larger size of Sharia board along with a highly-concentrated ownership structure have a positive effect on the Takaful insurance performance in both the SEA and GCC regions. Furthermore, the higher the Sharia board meetings, the higher performance of all types of Takaful insurance providers in the sample. As for the moderating effect of the director’s seniority, it is found to negatively moderate the relationship between the governance mechanisms and the Takaful performance in both regions.

Originality/value

This paper highlights that the leader’s entrenchment stands as an obstructing factor impeding the governance mechanisms from enhancing Takaful performance. Thus, it serves to contribute to clearly understanding the appropriate governance mechanisms usefully fit for a Takaful insurance effective performance, applying the wakalah and hybrid contract types. Such a contribution should be appreciated by the concerned regulators engaged in setting up limited serving periods for the directors whereby the Takaful insurance practice could be efficiently managed and supervised.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Maria Karanika-Murray, Dimitra Gkiontsi and Thom Baguley

Although visible leader support is an essential ingredient for successful organizational health interventions, knowledge on how leaders at different hierarchical levels…

Abstract

Purpose

Although visible leader support is an essential ingredient for successful organizational health interventions, knowledge on how leaders at different hierarchical levels engage with interventions is underdeveloped. The purpose of this paper is to explore leader engagement by drawing from the experiences of the intervention team.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from semi-structured interviews with the team responsible for implementing an organizational health intervention in two large UK organizations were used to examine how leaders at strategic (senior management) and operational (line managers) positions engaged with the intervention.

Findings

Thematic analysis uncovered 6 themes and 16 sub-themes covering the leaders’ initial reactions to the intervention, barriers to leader engagement, ways in which the intervention team dealt with these barriers, factors facilitating and factors accelerating leader engagement, and differences in engagement between leadership levels.

Research limitations/implications

This study can inform research into the conditions for optimizing leader engagement in organizational health interventions and beyond. Insights also emerged on the roles of leaders at different hierarchical levels and the value of perspective taking for intervention implementation.

Practical implications

Recommendations for bolstering the engagement of leaders in interventions are offered, that apply to all leaders or separately to leaders at strategic or operational levels.

Originality/value

The experiences of the intervention team who sought to engage leaders at different organizational levels to support the intervention are invaluable. Understanding how leader engagement can be maximized can better equip intervention teams for delivering successful interventions.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Guangyou Liu and Hong Ren

This paper aims to investigate the impacts of audit engagement team’s ethical leadership, trainee auditors’ reporting intent and other selected factors on their likelihood…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impacts of audit engagement team’s ethical leadership, trainee auditors’ reporting intent and other selected factors on their likelihood of reporting client’s irregularities.

Design/methodology/approach

The present investigation is based on 150 effective questionnaire responses provided by a group of trainee auditors working for certified public accounting (CPA) firms. The questionnaire items relating to trainee auditors’ likelihood of reporting client’s irregularities are based on Crawford and Weirich’s (2011) classification of common forms of fraudulent financial reporting. The authors’ measurement of the audit engagement team leaders’ ethicality is based on the ethical leadership scale developed in Newstrom and Ruch (1975) and Kantor and Weisberg (2002). Regression models are used to testify the authors’ hypotheses on the correlations of the trainee auditors’ likelihood of reporting client’s irregularities with audit engagement team’s ethical leadership, trainee auditor’ reporting intents and other selected factors.

Findings

The major conclusion of this study is that there is a significantly positive correlation between trainee auditors’ likelihood of reporting client’s irregularities and their perception of audit engagement team leader’s ethicality. This paper also points out that trainee auditors’ higher evaluation of stable firm–client relationship reduces their likelihood of reporting client’s irregularities, whereas their concerns with future career development increase the likelihood of reporting. In addition, this paper documents the fact that male trainee auditors more easily perceive the ethicality of their team leader than females, and that trainee auditors with less academic achievements (lower GPA) tend to perceive more easily the ethicality of their team leader than those with better academic achievements (higher GPA).

Research limitations/implications

Two business ethics variables constructed and used in this study, i.e. trainee auditors’ likelihood of reporting client’s irregularities and engagement team leader’s ethicality, can be applied in future research on whistleblowing in the audit profession.

Practical implications

Practical implications can also be drawn from the findings to enhance the ethical management at both engagement and firm levels.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the audit research literature by providing evidence on the significant positive impacts of team leader’s ethicality on the entry-level audit professional’s likelihood of reporting client’s irregularities.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Ghulam Hussain, Wan Khairuzzaman Wan Ismail, Muhammad Amir Rashid and Fareeha Nisar

The purpose of this study is to explore alternative models of substitutes for leadership. These alternative models are a leadership-only model, substitutes for the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore alternative models of substitutes for leadership. These alternative models are a leadership-only model, substitutes for the leadership-only model and substitutes for the leadership-mediated-effects model.

Design/methodology/approach

Four occupational groups were targeted, namely, PhD faculty of institutions of higher education, medical doctors who work in district headquarters’ hospitals, licensed pharmacists and certified engineers. Also, a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data, and 523 usable responses were received.

Findings

Partial least square path modeling was used for data analysis, and the results of structural models revealed that: the dimensions of transformational leadership significantly affected the followers’ outcomes; a few substitutes for leadership also significantly affected the followers’ outcomes; and, in some cases, substitutes for leadership significantly mediated the relationship between dimensions of transformational leadership and followers’ outcomes.

Practical implications

Findings of the study provide useful implications to improve the managerial practices of organizational leaders, work design strategies in organizations and overall organizational policies for effective functioning. Other developing countries with similar socio-economic status may use these findings to improve organizational functioning.

Originality/value

This study makes important contributions to the leadership literature. It tests three alternative models in the domain of substitutes for the leadership theory and tests the separate effects of dimensions of transformational leadership and substitutes for leadership on followers’ work outcomes. Further, it specifies the mediating effects of substitutes for leadership on the dimensions of transformational leadership and followers’ work outcomes. Most important, this study for the first time tests transformational leadership and substitutes for leadership concepts in Pakistani work settings and advances the theoretical and empirical literature in this local context.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Natalie Govaerts, Eva Kyndt, Filip Dochy and Herman Baert

The aim of this study is to investigate some factors that have an influence on employee retention. Based on the literature and previous research, both employee and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to investigate some factors that have an influence on employee retention. Based on the literature and previous research, both employee and organisational factors are taken into account.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by means of a questionnaire that was distributed on a voluntary basis in professional organisations and among employees, both electronically and in hard‐copy, during 2008‐2009. The study sample consisted of 972 employees, mainly clerks, from diverse profit and social‐profit organisations.

Findings

The results show that when organisations want to retain their employees it is important to pay attention to the learning of employees. Letting people do more and learn more of what they are good at will encourage them to stay with the organisation. Results concerning the selected employee variables show that only age has a significant relationship with retention. Regarding the intention to stay, there exists a positive relationship between age and retention.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study is that both employee as organizational factors are measured through the perceptions of employees. The response set of subjects when responding to self‐report measures could therefore be the result of a temporary mood, or could be the result of what may be considered as socially appropriate by the participants. Another limitation is that the questionnaire was voluntarily completed by the respondents; the researcher had therefore no information about the non‐respondents.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on the factors influencing employee retention.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2007

Aya Fukushige and David P. Spicer

The paper aims to explore Japanese followers' leadership preferences and consider the suitability of Bass and Avolio's full‐range leadership model in Japan.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore Japanese followers' leadership preferences and consider the suitability of Bass and Avolio's full‐range leadership model in Japan.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach is used predominantly, including template analyses and several content analyses. Data collection is divided into two phases: Phase 1 was conducted by semi‐structured interviews and Phase 2 by questionnaires.

Findings

Results suggest the unsuitability of Bass and Avolio's full‐range leadership model in a Japanese context, indicate some impact of cultural changes in Japan, and identify liberal, trust, punctual, network, protective, and after‐five as Japanese culture‐specific preferred leadership styles.

Research limitations/implications

The paper indicates that in a Japanese context not only is the new leadership approach of Bass and Avolio's model of value but also the traditional approach of House's path‐goal theory. Whilst the qualitative data of this study give insight into existing theories and leadership perspectives in Japan, findings should be further examined in future research.

Practical implications

The paper offers guidance for leaders who deal with Japanese followers by identifying leadership styles within Bass and Avolio's model, and culture‐specific leadership styles which are particularly preferred by Japanese followers.

Originality/value

This paper identified that, building upon Bass and Avolio's and House's leadership theories, a new Japanese leadership model, which particularly suits contemporary Japanese followers' leadership preferences, should be developed.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Bob Wheeler

This article explores the practical difficulties of leadership in a complex and fast‐moving environment. It argues that in the context of the public sector, where…

Abstract

This article explores the practical difficulties of leadership in a complex and fast‐moving environment. It argues that in the context of the public sector, where stakeholders and legitimate interests are many and varied, the challenge is even greater for leaders. Despite these difficulties, the key is to ensure that they get the right things done with and through other people, whether in the context of day‐to‐day transactional leadership or during periods of transformational change.This article demonstrates that the existence of an explicit, principle‐driven model of leadership is a particularly important vehicle for encouraging distributed leadership, effective partnership and team working.The basis on which leaders adapt their behaviour appropriately to the nature of the task and the people concerned is the measure that will be applied when considering an individual's leadership wisdom. The quality of those choices when faced with decisions will have an immense impact not just on the leader's reputation but also on his or her ability to achieve positive outcomes whilst maintaining an appropriate life balance.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 September 2019

Gloria Nakie Apore and Emmanuel Selase Asamoah

In spite of the observation that nurse managers’ style of authority in sub-Saharan Africa is one of antagonistic vibe and lordship, there is not much information on the…

Abstract

Purpose

In spite of the observation that nurse managers’ style of authority in sub-Saharan Africa is one of antagonistic vibe and lordship, there is not much information on the kind of leadership provided in the hospitals by nurse managers. Following the notion that transformational leadership is a solution to many leadership problems and often creates valuable positive change in followers, this study aims to examine the level of transformational leadership behavior of nurse leaders; determining the effects of the sub-constructs of emotional intelligence (EI) on the transformational leadership behavior of leaders; and determining whether there is a difference in the exhibition of transformational leadership behavior due to the gender of leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses five of the major public hospitals in the Greater Accra Region (the capital) of Ghana. Evidence of such links would be considerable for Ghanaian healthcare providers in their quest to find potential nurse leaders to train, so as not to dwell highly on the seniority criterion in the selection of leaders. Using a quantitative approach, the Wong Law EI Scale (2002) and leadership items adapted from Rafferty and Griffin (2004) were used to collect the data. A descriptive statistics (mean) revealed that nurse leaders from the selected hospitals exhibited a high level (M= 3.90, SD = 0.14) of transformational leadership behavior.

Findings

A multiple regression analysis revealed that three of the sub-constructs of EI significantly affected transformational leadership with the “self-emotion appraisal” construct having the strongest effect on transformational leadership behavior (β = 0.508, p = 0.000). However, the others’ emotion appraisal sub-construct did not significantly affect transformational leadership. Furthermore, the results from the independent sample t-test revealed no significant difference in the exhibition of transformational leadership due to gender.

Practical implications

Based on the findings, when leaders are trained to be emotionally intelligent and their skills are fostered, they are more likely to exhibit transformational leadership behaviors, which will further result in organizational effectiveness and follower satisfaction. Hospitals must focus on the control of one’s emotions at work, and subsequently, understanding others’ emotions. In developing transformational leaders, there is the need to identify some tools that will increase EI level, more specifically, traits related to the understanding of others’ emotion. The findings from this study indicate that one of the factors to check when selecting nurse leaders should be their EI and not necessarily a matter of seniority in many cases in emerging economies.

Originality/value

The originality of this study is in the fact that it focuses on an emerging economy, which is under researched. In Ghana, the criteria for promotion of nurse leaders’ is based strictly on seniority and age and not on factors such as the leaders EI. The profession of nursing is such that leaders need to understand that certain soft skills such as EI are considered necessary to transform the hospitals and staff they lead. This study, therefore, sheds light on these key areas from the perspective of an emerging economy, which are usually not in the domain of literature in the area of healthcare leadership.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Michael Walton

This paper aims to outline three ways in which a leader's behavior‐in‐context can be examined. As such it moves away from an emphasis on a leader's “performance and

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline three ways in which a leader's behavior‐in‐context can be examined. As such it moves away from an emphasis on a leader's “performance and personality” and focuses on underlying contextual features which can lead to success or failure.

Design/method/approach

The paper examines some of the possible bases for dysfunctional leadership and concludes that such counter‐productive behavior may be contextually determined. Three ways of looking at executive behavior‐in‐context are used to highlight the need to look beyond a leader's style in order to assess their organizational achievements.

Findings

Any assessment of a leader's performance should be based on their behavior‐in‐context.

Practical implications

The paper offers ways in which executive appointments, succession decisions and performance appraisal can be enhanced by taking a closer and more nuanced assessment of the behavior of leaders.

Originality/value

The paper brings together three ways of re‐viewing leadership misbehavior and offers an alternative to an over focus on the personality of the leader as the core basis for success or failure.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Lurdes Gonçalves and Filipa Brandão

Empirical studies on humility in the area of organizational studies are still scarce, as are studies of humility in leadership. This research aims to contribute to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Empirical studies on humility in the area of organizational studies are still scarce, as are studies of humility in leadership. This research aims to contribute to the literature by studying how the humility of leaders predicts the team's creativity through the mediating effect of psychological security and psychological capital.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample includes 73 teams and their leaders, from 40 firms operating in different industries. Leaders (n = 73) described their own humility and team creativity. Team members (n = 341) described the leader’s humility, and the team’s psychological safety and psychological capital.

Findings

Structural equation modelling (LISREL; maximum likelihood estimation) was used to test the hypothesized model. The findings are represented in Figure 1 (control variables not shown), and the results suggest that the leader’s humility predicts team creativity through team’s psychological safety (PsySafe) and psychological capital (PsyCap).

Research limitations/implications

Main limitations are the small sample size, and the fact that it is a convenience sample, which may limit the generalization of results. One may add the need to conduct longitudinal studies, as well as have a comparison among different regions or countries. These issues are addressed in the study.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the still limited literature relating humility and leadership. For organizations, if they want to be effective in innovating, they need to understand the influence of the mechanisms that the employees are exposed to and how they influence their creativity. Knowing the positive role of humble leadership in creativity development and employee motivation is particularly interesting for leaders working in the context of creativity, as it is a way of facilitating creativity of employees.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

1 – 10 of 284