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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Lana Peterson, Cassie Scharber, Amy Thuesen and Katie Baskin

In March of 2020, Minnesota schools were mandated to transition to distance learning to slow the spread of COVID-19. The charge of providing equitable and appropriate remote…

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Abstract

Purpose

In March of 2020, Minnesota schools were mandated to transition to distance learning to slow the spread of COVID-19. The charge of providing equitable and appropriate remote learning to all students gave administrators, educators and non-academic staff a few weeks to completely redesign education. This paper aims to describe one district’s experience in planning and offering distance education and build precedent other educational leaders may use in future designs.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study documents how one rural K12 district leveraged their strong foundation of technology integration and created crisis remote learning solutions for its most marginalized student populations including special education students, English learners and financially disadvantaged students.

Findings

This study shares examples of how this district prioritized relationships and the well-being of students and staff and outlines practical strategies for equitable distance learning that should be considered during and beyond emergency remote teaching.

Originality/value

This paper provides just-in-time practical advice for K12 administrators and educators on navigating crisis distance learning.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 121 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Lana Peterson and Cassandra Scharber

The purpose of this paper is to describe the practice of using student technology teams (STTs) offered at a high school within a 1:1 district.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the practice of using student technology teams (STTs) offered at a high school within a 1:1 district.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative case study (Merriam, 1998, 2009) documents how an STT program functioned in 2015-2016 academic year.

Findings

Findings show the STT provided a rich and authentic learning opportunity for students interested in information technology. The district benefits greatly through both cost savings and personnel support related to its 1:1 initiative.

Originality/value

As there is no current research on K-12 STTs, this study serves as a foundation for a practice that is growing within schools.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Noah Askin and Joeri Mol

Since the arrival of mass production, commodification has been plaguing markets – none more so than that for music. By separating production and consumption in space and time…

Abstract

Since the arrival of mass production, commodification has been plaguing markets – none more so than that for music. By separating production and consumption in space and time, commodification challenges the very conditions underlying economic exchange. This chapter explores authenticity as the institutional response to the commodification of music, rekindling the relationship between isolated market participants in the increasingly digitized world of music. Building upon the “Production of Culture” perspective, we unpack the commodification of music across five different institutional realms – (1) production, (2) consumption, (3) selection, (4) appropriation, and (5) classification – and provide a thoroughly relational account of authenticity as an institutional practice.

Details

Frontiers of Creative Industries: Exploring Structural and Categorical Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-773-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Misty M. Bennett, Terry A. Beehr and Lana V. Ivanitskaya

The purpose of this paper is to examine work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict, taking into account generational cohort and life cycle stage differences.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict, taking into account generational cohort and life cycle stage differences.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey participants (428 employed individuals with families) represented different generations and life cycles. Key variables were work/family characteristics and centrality, work-family and family-work conflict, and age.

Findings

Generational differences in both directions were found. Gen X-ers reported the most work-family conflict, followed by Millennials and then Baby Boomers. Baby Boomers exhibited family-work conflict the most, followed by Gen X-ers, and then Millennials, a surprising finding given generational stereotypes. Some of these differences remained after controlling for children in the household (based on life cycle stage theory) and age. Millennials were highest in work centrality, whereas Baby Boomers were highest in family centrality. Employees with children ages 13-18 reported the most work-family conflict, and employees with children under the age of six reported the most family-work conflict.

Research limitations/implications

This study found that generation and children in the household make a difference in work-family conflict, but it did not support some of the common generational stereotypes. Future studies should use a time-lag technique to study generational differences. To reduce work-family conflict, it is important to consider its directionality, which varies across generations and life cycle stages.

Practical implications

This informs organizations on how to tailor interventions to help employees balance work/life demands.

Originality/value

This study is the first to simultaneously examine both generation and life cycle stage (children in the household) in regard to work-family conflict.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Lana Lučić, Tihana Brkljačić and Andreja Brajša-Žganec

Social distancing and school closures have changed the lives of many parents around the globe. In addition to these problems, parents of children with developmental difficulties…

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Abstract

Purpose

Social distancing and school closures have changed the lives of many parents around the globe. In addition to these problems, parents of children with developmental difficulties (DD) have faced additional stressors that make them even more susceptible to higher stress levels and the onset or worsening of anxiety or depression. Consequentially, these stressors may have an indirect effect on parental functioning and children with DD owing to the spillover effect.

Design/methodology/approach

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to parents of children with DD through an overview of possible additional stressors that have appeared during the coronavirus pandemic in Croatia. In writing this viewpoint paper, three sources were consulted: official state documents, communication with professionals (e.g. speech therapists) and online support groups for parents of children with DD.

Findings

Restrictive measures during the lockdown led to a lack of both formal and informal support for parents of children with DD. Moreover, the possibility of infection led to higher levels of fear among these parents; children with DD also encountered problems coping with both the restrictive measures and the demands of distance learning.

Practical implications

This paper may present a good starting point for both governments and NGOs when discussing and planning further advancement in the quality of response to the COVID-19 pandemic and a “recovery” response after the crisis. This overview may provide better insight into COVID-19–related consequences among parents of children with DD, which is vital to increasing the effectiveness of future measures and actions.

Originality/value

Although some negative effects of the pandemic on children have already been discussed by several authors, little attention has been paid to parents, and even less so to parents of children with DD. This paper may even represent a pioneering work in exploring the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on this population group.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Abstract

Details

Generation Impact
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-929-9

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2024

Ariel Cornett and Erin Piedmont

Place-based, social studies teaching and learning has the potential to foster engaged citizens connected and committed to improving their communities. This study explored the…

Abstract

Purpose

Place-based, social studies teaching and learning has the potential to foster engaged citizens connected and committed to improving their communities. This study explored the research question, “In what ways do classroom and field-based experiences prepare teacher candidates (TCs) to make connections between place-based education and elementary social studies education?”

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative case study examined how elementary TCs learned about, researched, curated and created place-based social studies educational resources related to community sites. Data collection included TCs’ Pre- and Post-Course Reflections as well as Self-Evaluations, which were analyzed using an inductive approach and multiple rounds of concept coding. Several themes emerged through data analysis.

Findings

The authors organized their findings around three themes: connections (i.e. place becomes personal), immersion (i.e. learning about place to learning in place) and bridge building (i.e. local as classroom). The classroom and field-based experiences in the elementary social studies methods course informed the ways in which TCs learned about and connected to the concept of place, experienced place in a specific place (i.e. downtown Statesboro, Georgia), and reflected upon the myriad ways that they could utilize place in their future elementary social studies classrooms.

Originality/value

TCs (as well as in-service teachers and teacher educators) must become more informed, connected and committed to places within their local communities in order to consider them as resources for elementary social studies teaching and learning.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Clemon George, Lydia Makoroka, Winston Husbands, Barry D. Adam, Robert Remis, Sean Rourke and Stanley Read

The purpose of this paper is to develop a profile of the sexual behavioural characteristics of black men who have sex with men (MSM) in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Canada who…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a profile of the sexual behavioural characteristics of black men who have sex with men (MSM) in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Canada who constitute a unique mixture in terms of background, race, ethnicity, and culture. Having a profile of the sexual health and risk taking behaviours of these men is important since it provides information on these black Canadian men in comparison other black MSM.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected as part of a cross-sectional study of black MSM in GTA. Survey participants completed a questionnaire requesting information on socio-demographic characteristics, sexual behaviour, general and mental health, and awareness of social marketing strategies for gay men. The study was conducted in 2007-2008, through convenience sampling. Based on the data collected, the authors characterized the profile of black MSM with respect to sexual risk behaviours.

Findings

The authors collected data on 168 black MSM. These men perceived their general health to be good. However, a large proportion of them practiced inconsistent condom use but this varied according to the ethnicity of the partner. Inconsistent condom use also varied by place of birth with Canadian-born men and Caribbean-born men less likely to consistently use condoms than African-born men. In multiple regression analysis, being born in Africa favoured condom use. Men were also more likely to practice inconsistent condoms use when the sexual partner was non-black. Further, when sex with other black men was examined, those who were older (30 years) and had not disclosed their sexuality were more likely to stop using condoms. Other variables which were expected to have associations with inconsistent condom use, based on studies in other jurisdictions – such as previous sexually transmitted infections, sex with women, sex while travelling, and drug use were not related to inconsistent condom use.

Research limitations/implications

While the survey data were based on a relatively small sample size and may not be representative of the entire black MSM population in the GTA, it provides a basis for ongoing and targeted support for black MSM particularly those born in Canada. Older men who are not open with their sexuality may be at a risk of acquiring or transmitting HIV. Future research should focus on these men.

Originality/value

This report provides a perspective on the sexual health and risk taking behaviours of black MSM in Canada. This is particularly important since their social history and health determinants are different from those of US African Americans. The results will stimulate further research targeting this group, and support HIV programmes and services for these men.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Mark Williams, Natasha Pauli and Bryan Boruff

Climate change, deforestation and hydropower dams are contributing to environmental change in the Lower Mekong River region, the combined effects of which are felt by many rural…

Abstract

Climate change, deforestation and hydropower dams are contributing to environmental change in the Lower Mekong River region, the combined effects of which are felt by many rural Cambodians. How people perceive and manage the effects of environmental change will influence future adaptation strategies. The objective of this research was to investigate whether the use of a low-cost, explicitly spatial method (participatory mapping) can help identify locally relevant opportunities and challenges to climate change adaptation in small, flood-prone communities. Four villages along the banks of the Mekong River in Kratie Province, Cambodia, were the subject of this research. To identify perceived environmental hazards and adaptive responses, eight workshops were conducted using focus-group interviews and participatory mapping. The communities’ responses highlight the evolving nature of environmental hazards, as droughts increase in perceived importance while the patterns of wet season flooding were also perceived to be changing. The attribution of the drivers of these hazards was strongly skewed towards local factors such as deforestation and less towards regional or global drivers affecting the hydrology of the Mekong and climate patterns. Combining participatory mapping with focus-group interviews allowed a greater depth of understanding of the vulnerabilities and opportunities available to communities than reliance on a single qualitative method. The study highlights the potential for a bottom-up transfer of information to strengthen existing climate change policies and tailor adaptation plans to local conditions.

Details

Climate-Induced Disasters in the Asia-Pacific Region: Response, Recovery, Adaptation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-987-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 May 2017

Dara E. Purvis

In recent years, school districts have faced numerous questions surrounding accommodations of transgender students. Strong objections to accommodations have been voiced in public…

Abstract

In recent years, school districts have faced numerous questions surrounding accommodations of transgender students. Strong objections to accommodations have been voiced in public argument and litigation, primarily in the areas of athletics, bathrooms, and dress codes. As younger transgender students express their gender identity at school, however, the existing objections are weakened by considering the context of elementary rather than high school students. Greater numbers of young transgender students will likely encourage accommodation of trans students of all ages, as well as challenge the gender binary unconsciously taught in school.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-344-9

Keywords

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