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Publication date: 17 February 2015

Leah Ruppanner

To investigate the association between country-level differences in childcare enrollment, the presence of affirmative action policy, and female parliamentary…

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the association between country-level differences in childcare enrollment, the presence of affirmative action policy, and female parliamentary representation and individual-level conflict between work and family.

Methodology/approach

This study applies data from the 2002 International Social Survey Program (n = 14,000 + ) for respondents in 29 countries and pairs them with macro-level measures of childcare enrollment, the presence of affirmative action policy, and female parliamentary representation. I estimate the model using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM 7) and also assess cross-level interactions by gender and parental status.

Findings

The models show that female parliamentary representation has a robust negative association with individual-level reports of work–family and family–work conflict. These associations do not vary by gender or parental status. Also, mothers report less family–work conflict in countries with more expansive childcare enrollment, indicating that this welfare policy benefits the intended group.

Research limitations/implications

This research implies that greater female parliamentary representation has widespread benefits to all citizens’, rather than just women’s or mothers’, work–family and family–work conflict. Additional longitudinal research would benefit this area of study.

Practical implications

This research suggests that increasing female parliamentary representation at the country-level may promote work–life balance at the individual-level. It also indicates that public childcare enrollment benefits women through lower family–work conflict which may encourage continuous maternal labor force participation and reduce economic gender inequality.

Originality/value

This chapter builds on an emerging area of work–family research applying multilevel modeling to draw empirical links between individual work–family experiences and macro-level structural variation.

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Osman M. Karatepe

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a conceptual model, which investigates the effects of work‐family conflict, family‐work conflict, work‐family…

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3034

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a conceptual model, which investigates the effects of work‐family conflict, family‐work conflict, work‐family facilitation, and family‐work facilitation simultaneously on exhaustion. This study also aims to examine work social support as a moderator in the relationship between two directions of conflict and facilitation and exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were collected from a judgmental sample of full‐time frontline employees of the four‐ and five‐star hotels of Albania. Respondents self‐administered the questionnaires. A total number of 107 questionnaires were retrieved.

Findings

The results of the hierarchical multiple regression analysis demonstrate that both work‐family conflict and family‐work conflict amplify exhaustion. The results also indicate that work social support buffers the relationship between work‐family conflict and exhaustion and strengthens the negative relationship between work‐family facilitation and exhaustion.

Research limitations/implications

In future studies, longitudinal research designs should be employed to draw causal inferences regarding the relationships examined in the current study. Though common method bias was checked with Harman's single‐factor test using confirmatory factor analysis, gathering data from multiple sources would minimise problems associated with common method bias.

Practical implications

Hotel managers in Albania should benefit from establishing a family‐supportive work environment to enable their employees to manage their work and family roles effectively. Training programs should be organised to teach employees and their supervisors concerning the critical importance of support surfacing from coworkers and supervisors in alleviating the detrimental impact of work‐family conflict on exhaustion and increasing the negative association between work‐family facilitation and exhaustion.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the compendium of knowledge by examining the aforementioned relationships via data gathered from a sample of full‐time frontline hotel employees in Albania.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

Ugur Yavas, Emin Babakus and Osman M. Karatepe

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a conceptual model to examine the effects of work‐family conflict, family‐work conflict, and emotional exhaustion on job…

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4315

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a conceptual model to examine the effects of work‐family conflict, family‐work conflict, and emotional exhaustion on job performance and turnover intentions. The paper also aims to investigate the role of gender as a moderator of the posited relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of frontline hotel employees in Turkey serves as the study setting. Data were collected via self‐administered questionnaires. A total of 723 usable responses were obtained.

Findings

The results show that employees facing conflicts originating from their work (family) and family (work) roles become emotionally exhausted. These two forms of interrole conflicts are also significant predictors of frontline employees' turnover intentions. Gender moderates several of the relationships proposed in this paper.

Practical implications

Turkish hotels will benefit from establishing a family‐supportive work environment to lessen the detrimental impact of conflicts in the work‐family interface on frontline employees' emotional exhaustion and job outcomes. A dual (i.e. gender‐specific) approach appears to hold promise in managing frontline employees.

Originality/value

When these results are compared to the results of studies conducted in western countries, a number of similarities become evident. These similarities broadly suggest that research findings derived from western countries are generalizable into a culturally different setting, and support the premise that as traditional gender roles continue to expand and change, a convergence of findings in work‐family research takes place cross‐culturally.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Osman M. Karatepe

The present study seeks to propose and test a research model that investigates emotional exhaustion as a mediator of the effects of work overload, work‐family conflict

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10857

Abstract

Purpose

The present study seeks to propose and test a research model that investigates emotional exhaustion as a mediator of the effects of work overload, work‐family conflict, and family‐work conflict on job embeddedness and job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study evaluated the aforementioned relationships using LISREL 8.30 through structural equation modeling (SEM) based on data collected from 110 full‐time frontline hotel employees and their managers in Romania.

Findings

The results of SEM suggest that emotional exhaustion functions as a full mediator of the effects of work overload, work‐family conflict, and family‐work conflict on job embeddedness and job performance. Specifically, employees who have heavy workloads and are unable to establish a balance between work (family) and family (work) roles are emotionally exhausted. Such employees in turn are less embedded in their jobs and display poor performance in the service delivery process.

Research limitations/implications

In future studies having longitudinal data would be useful for drawing causal inferences among study variables. Employing cross‐cultural research in future studies would also be helpful.

Practical implications

Management of the hotels should take decisive steps to establish and maintain a supportive work environment because such an environment would help employees to balance their work (family) and family (work) roles and lead to reduced emotional exhaustion. Otherwise, it would be very difficult to retain high performing employees in the workplace. Hiring individuals who fit well with the job and organizational culture via objective tests and experiential exercises would also be helpful for employee retention.

Originality/value

The current study contributes to the existing knowledge base by testing emotional exhaustion as a mediator of the impacts of work overload, work‐family conflict, and family‐work conflict on job embeddedness and job performance through data gathered from frontline hotel employee‐manager dyads in Romania.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Katarina Katja Mihelič

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of work-family and family-work conflict and enrichment in predicting job satisfaction and its subsequent relation with…

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2561

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of work-family and family-work conflict and enrichment in predicting job satisfaction and its subsequent relation with turnover intentions in a transition country.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examined the role of work-family and family-work conflict and enrichment in predicting job satisfaction and its subsequent relation with turnover intentions in a transition country.

Findings

While work-family enrichment was significantly and positively related to job satisfaction, family-work enrichment was not. A similar pattern was observed for conflict, whereby only work-family conflict exhibited a positive relation to job satisfaction. Moreover, job satisfaction partially mediated the relationships between work-family interface and turnover intentions. The results revealed indirect effects of work-family enrichment and work-family conflict on turnover intentions.

Originality/value

This study is unique because it tested the relationships among the negative and positive sides of the work-family interface and job attitudes in a transition country in CEE, an underrepresented cultural context in the work-family literature. Furthermore, it tested the direct and indirect effects of work-family interface on turnover intentions. In addition, it provided evidence of the significance of same-domain effects and insignificance of cross-domain effects.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Aqeel Ahmed Soomro, Robert J. Breitenecker and Syed Afzal Moshadi Shah

People in both the developing and developed worlds now face issues like work-to-family and family-to-work conflicts. Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to explore…

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6713

Abstract

Purpose

People in both the developing and developed worlds now face issues like work-to-family and family-to-work conflicts. Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships between work-life balance, work-family conflict, and family-work conflict and perceived employee performance with job satisfaction serving as a moderating variable.

Design/methodology/approach

The object of this study is a full-time teaching faculty. Responses from 280 young university teaching faculty serving in public-sector universities in Islamabad, Pakistan, were investigated by applying linear regression analysis to test six hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that work-life balance and work-family conflict have a positive effect on employee performance. Job satisfaction has moderating effects on the relationships between work-life balance, work-family conflict, and family-work conflict with perceived employee performance.

Originality/value

The study presents some unique results, which are different from previous studies such as work-family conflict has a positive significant effect on employee performance, family-work conflict has no significant effect on employee performance, and job satisfaction can be a negative moderator between these relations.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Ebru Arslaner and Yasin Boylu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between perceived organizational support, work-family conflict, family-work conflict and presenteeism in the…

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1595

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between perceived organizational support, work-family conflict, family-work conflict and presenteeism in the context of hotel industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via survey administered to 402 employees of five-star hotels in Antalya, Turkey. Data were analyzed using SPSS package program.

Findings

The results showed that there was a significant and negative relationship between perceived organizational support and presenteeism and a significant and positive relationship between work-family/family-work conflict and presenteeism. Moreover, perceived organizational support had no significant effect on presenteeism, while work-family/family-work conflict had a significant effect on presenteeism.

Practical implications

Hotels need a healthy and productive workforce to ensure customer satisfaction and increase the quality of service. Reducing work-family/family-work conflict and increasing organizations’ support to employees is critical for protecting employee health and eliminating presenteeism behavior.

Originality/value

This study provides organizations with practical and theoretical implications to improve employee health and productivity.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 72 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

W. Gary Howard, Heather Howard Donofrio and James S. Boles

This research investigates the relationship between inter‐domain conflict in the form of work‐family conflict and family‐work conflict with various facets of employee job…

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4490

Abstract

This research investigates the relationship between inter‐domain conflict in the form of work‐family conflict and family‐work conflict with various facets of employee job satisfaction. The study was conducted among police personnel (n = 119) in a large southeastern state. Results indicate that work‐family conflict is significantly related to satisfaction with job in general, pay, supervision, promotion, work, and co‐workers. Family‐work conflict is not as consistently related to the facets of job satisfaction. In general, as expected, conflict between work‐family is more closely related to employee job satisfaction than conflict between family‐work. Managerial implications are included as well as directions for future theoretical research.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Mian Zhang, Rodger W. Griffeth and David D. Fried

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between two forms of work‐family conflict – work‐family conflict and family‐work conflict – and individual…

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4725

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between two forms of work‐family conflict – work‐family conflict and family‐work conflict – and individual consequences for Chinese managers.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants of this study were 264 managers from Mainland China. The authors tested their hypotheses with structural equation modeling.

Findings

Work‐family conflict was positively associated with emotional exhaustion. Family‐work conflict was negatively associated with life satisfaction and affective commitment, as well as positively related to turnover intentions. Contrary to the research with samples of workers from Western countries (e.g. the USA), the study found that work‐family conflict was positively associated with affective commitment and did not associate with turnover intentions for Chinese managers.

Originality/value

Using the perspective of the Chinese prioritizing work for family benefits, the authors are the first to provide a preliminary test of the generalizability of the source attribution and the cross‐domain models to Chinese managers. The paper's findings provide the preliminary evidence that the cross‐domain model works among the Chinese because of its cultural neutrality whereas the source attribution model cannot be used to predict the associations between work‐family conflict and work‐related consequences.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Margaret Posig and Jill Kickul

A model integrating work‐role expectations of employees, work‐family conflict, family‐work conflict, and a component of burnout was proposed and empirically tested on 163…

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6983

Abstract

A model integrating work‐role expectations of employees, work‐family conflict, family‐work conflict, and a component of burnout was proposed and empirically tested on 163 employees, who were also part of dual‐earner couples. Gender differences were found in the proposed model. For males, work‐family conflict mediated the relationship between work‐role expectations and emotional exhaustion. Although the same indirect relationship was found for females, a direct relationship also existed between work‐role expectations and emotional exhaustion. Additionally, for females, family‐work conflict was found to be a key contributor to work‐family conflict and emotional exhaustion. Managerial implications and future research directions are discussed.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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