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1 – 10 of over 57000
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2022

Kelly Basile, T. Alexandra Beauregard, Esther Canonico-Martin and Kylee Gause

This study aims to explore how working parents use personal technology to manage parenting responsibilities and to identify how technology use might help to support…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how working parents use personal technology to manage parenting responsibilities and to identify how technology use might help to support work–family balance.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth telephone interviews with US and UK working parents with children under the age of 18 were conducted.

Findings

Findings suggest that personal technology can facilitate work and family activities and reduce work–family conflict by enabling parents to perform certain parenting duties remotely. However, parental attitudes toward technology and children’s rights to privacy influence both technology use and work and family outcomes.

Practical implications

By better understanding employee personal technology use, and how this use facilitates reduced conflict between work and family roles, organizations might look to creatively expand their benefits offerings to include access/discounts to personal technology platforms that support parenting activities (e.g. Uber One, Amazon Prime and DoorDash).

Originality/value

While substantial research has been conducted on employee use of work-enabled technology to facilitate work–life balance, less attention has been paid to how working parents are using personal forms of technology to achieve this same outcome. This exploratory study establishes certain parenting functions that are facilitated by personal technology use and identifies some parental attitudes that influence technology adoption.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2006

Richard C. Hunter

Parent involvement is a major component of several school reform initiatives, including the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 commonly referred to as Title I…

Abstract

Parent involvement is a major component of several school reform initiatives, including the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 commonly referred to as Title I. Parent involvement is also an important provision in the latest reauthorization of the Leave No Child Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001, PL 107-110. Important research on parent involvement is presented in this chapter. Also, a brief discussion of the role parent involvement has played in several important school reform initiatives, such as decentralization, community control, and compensatory education are discussed. Finally, specific recommendations are given for school leaders, superintendents, and principals, on how to use parent involvement to help schools and students make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), a requirement of NCLB.

Details

No Child Left Behind and other Federal Programs for Urban School Districts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-299-3

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2022

Robin Cyriac and Saleem Durai M.A.

Routing protocol for low-power lossy network (RPL) being the de facto routing protocol used by low power lossy networks needs to provide adequate routing service to mobile…

Abstract

Purpose

Routing protocol for low-power lossy network (RPL) being the de facto routing protocol used by low power lossy networks needs to provide adequate routing service to mobile nodes (MNs) in the network. As RPL is designed to work under constraint power requirements, its route updating frequency is not sufficient for MNs in the network. The purpose of this study is to ensure that MNs enjoy seamless connection throughout the network with minimal handover delay.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes a load balancing mobility aware secure hybrid – RPL in which static node (SN) identifies route using metrics like expected transmission count, and path delay and parent selection are further refined by working on remaining energy for identifying the primary route and queue availability for secondary route maintenance. MNs identify route with the help of smart timers and by using received signal strength indicator sampling of parent and neighbor nodes. In this work, MNs are also secured against rank attack in RPL.

Findings

This model produces favorable result in terms of packet delivery ratio, delay, energy consumption and number of living nodes in the network when compared with different RPL protocols with mobility support. The proposed model reduces packet retransmission in the network by a large margin by providing load balancing to SNs and seamless connection to MNs.

Originality/value

In this work, a novel algorithm was developed to provide seamless handover for MNs in network. Suitable technique was developed to provide load balancing to SNs in network by maintaining appropriate secondary route.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2022

Jiajing Hu, Chuchu Ou, Mengying Zhang and Xingping Cao

Drawing on solidarity-conflict model, expectancy disconfirmation theory and bottom-up spillover theory, this study aims to explore how intergenerational conflict is linked…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on solidarity-conflict model, expectancy disconfirmation theory and bottom-up spillover theory, this study aims to explore how intergenerational conflict is linked to parents’ subjective well-being through the serial mediating effects of family intimacy and travel satisfaction, self-efficacy and travel satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a survey of 411 senior parents who have family travel experience, a structural equation modeling was performed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

This study demonstrated the negative impacts of intergenerational conflict on parents’ travel satisfaction and subjective well-being and further reveals two serial mediators through individual level and family level (i.e. self-efficacy → travel satisfaction; family intimacy → travel satisfaction).

Practical implications

The findings of this research generate valuable practical implications for family members and destination organizations. Adult children should consider different generations’ needs to choose tourism products, help parents reduce tension and negative emotions about unusual environments and build confidence. The destination organizations need to design family interaction projects with a sense of rituals to enhance family intimacy.

Originality/value

This study focusing on the intergenerational conflict of adult children traveling with parents, empirically examines the negative impacts of intergenerational conflict on parents’ subjective well-being, uncovers the detrimental effects of family travel; it breaks the stereotype that family travel is always full of joy, enriching research on intergenerational relationships and family travel.

目的

研究基于团结-冲突模型、期望不一致理论和自下而上溢出理论, 旨在通过家庭亲密度和旅行满意度、自我效能感和旅行满意度的链式中介效应探索代际冲突如何影响父母的主观幸福感。

设计/方法/步骤

基于411位有过家庭旅行经历的老年父母的调查数据, 运用结构方程模型检验假设。

研究结果

研究验证了代际冲突对父母旅行满意度和主观幸福感的负面影响, 并进一步从个人层面和家庭层面揭示了两个链式中介的作用(即自我效能感→ 旅行满意度; 家庭亲密→ 旅行满意度)。

独创性/价值

研究聚焦成年子女与父母一起旅行的代际冲突, 实证检验了代际冲突对父母主观幸福感的负面影响, 发现了家庭旅行中的消极面, 打破了家庭旅行总是充满欢乐的刻板印象, 丰富了代际关系和家庭旅行的研究成果。

实践意义

研究结果为家庭成员和目的地组织提供了具有价值的实践指导。成年子女在选择旅游产品时需要考虑不同的代际需求, 帮助父母减少非惯常环境中的紧张和负面情绪, 建立自信心。目的地组织可设计更具仪式感的家庭互动项目, 帮助提高家庭亲密度。

Propositus

Basado en el modelo de solidaridad-conflicto, la teoría de inconsistencia de expectativas y la teoría de desbordamiento de abajo hacia arriba, este estudio tiene como objetivo explorar cómo el conflicto intergeneracional está relacionado con el bienestar subjetivo de los padres a través de los efectos mediados de serie de la intimidad familiar y la satisfacción de viaje, la autoeficacia y la satisfacción de viaje.

Diseño/método/procedimiento

Basado en datos de encuestas de 411 padres mayores que tienen experiencia en viajes familiares, un modelo de ecuación estructural fue utilizado para probar las hipótesis.

Hallazgos

Este estudio demostró el impacto negativo del conflicto intergeneracional en la satisfacción de viaje de los padres y el bienestar subjetivo, y además reveló dos mediadores de serie a nivel individual y nivel familiar (es decir, autoeficacia →satisfacción de viaje; intimidad familiar →satisfacción de viaje).

Originalidad/valor

Este estudio se centra en el conflicto intergeneracional de los hijos adultos que viajan con sus padres, para examinar empíricamente el impacto negativo del conflicto intergeneracional en el bienestar subjetivo de los padres, revela los aspectos negativos de los viajes familiares, rompe el estereotipo de que los viajes familiares siempre están llenos de alegría, lo que enriquece el estudio de las relaciones intergeneracionales y los viajes familiares.

Implicaciones practices

Los hallazgos de este estudio proporciona valiosas implicaciones prácticas para los miembros de la familia y los organizadores de destinos. Los hijos adultos consideran las necesidades de diferentes generacionales para elegir productos de viaje, ayudar a los padres a reducir la tensión y las emociones negativas en entornos inusual y desarrollar la confianza y la. Los organizadores de destinos deben diseñar programas de interacción familiar con sentido de rituales para potenciar la intimidad familiar de los padres.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 30 September 2022

Zarin Khan Moon and Md. Mahedi Hasan

This study aims to explore whether the working parents' perception about the necessity of childcare centres for their work efficiency is associated with their anxieties…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore whether the working parents' perception about the necessity of childcare centres for their work efficiency is associated with their anxieties and concerns related to their dual responsibilities, i.e. providing proper parental childcare and maintaining work efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 100 employed parents, from the Jashore region of Bangladesh, was surveyed, and descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data.

Findings

It was revealed that there is a strong association between the perceived negative impact on job performance, childcare, child development, work efficiency and perceived need for a childcare centre.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this study is that it was confined to Jashore University of Science and Technology. The results may differ from those of the study conducted outside this study area and the methodology used here.

Practical implications

This study has significant practical implications for employers, childcare service providers and policy makers, especially in Bangladesh. The employers will be able to understand the demand for childcare services centres among the employed parents in respective organizations. It will draw attention of employers of knowledge intensive industries and grants commission to the issue of conflict of work and childcare-related responsibilities of employed parents. This will also make employers conscious about the dilemma that is undergone by employed parents motivating them to take actions for minimizing such conflicts to ensure better job performance of working parents.

Social implications

Based on this study, childcare providers and other policy makers will be able to ascertain the potential size of the childcare market and determine the requirement for investment in childcare-related human resources development. As the work and childcare responsibilities compete for limited time of working parents, either childcare or job performance suffers. This causes concerns, anxieties or remorse, which again hampers the job performance further. Therefore, this study may motivate the university authority around the world, specifically those in Bangladesh, to provide childcare facilities for its faculties, students and other employees.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on growing demand for centre-based childcare services in an emerging economy context. It provides evidence of high demand for on- and off-site childcare centres to enhance work efficiency of working parents.

Details

South Asian Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2719-2377

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2022

Ornat Turin and Shosh Davidson

The current study examines the ways preschool teachers handle parents' WhatsApp groups. The study explores the associations between professional capital, perception of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The current study examines the ways preschool teachers handle parents' WhatsApp groups. The study explores the associations between professional capital, perception of the application, and communication patterns with the parents utilizing WhatsApp, an instant message application.

Design/methodology/approach

A group of 214 Israeli preschool teachers were sampled using a survey questionnaire. The independent variables were two components of professional capital: (1) human capital, measured by tenure and income and (2) social capital, measured by the type of locality and the teacher's place of residence, in or outside the kindergarten's neighborhood. The dependent variable was the general perception of the app and the decisional capital manifested in the pattern of engagement with the pupils' parents.

Findings

In general, preschool teachers welcome the app, especially its ability to send pictures, while they disapprove of the constant intrusion it causes. Tenured and high-income teachers tended to restrict sharing a WhatsApp group with parents. Joining a group with parents was common among private, low-income, and non-tenured young teachers. In terms of social capital, teachers who lived and worked in a communal settlement differed from their city colleagues. Teachers in such communities expressed a much more positive perception of the WhatsApp application, in comparison with teachers from urban areas.

Originality/value

The results demonstrate the importance of professional capital in monitoring daily routine, communication, and emotions. The findings support the social constructivist approach, holding that technology affords a variety of uses and are integrated into the existing social structure.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2022

Lily Sin Nga Cheung, Dickson K.W. Chiu and Kevin K.W. Ho

This pilot study aims to investigate how parents use electronic resources to encourage children’s reading and learning interests through the 5E instructional model…

Abstract

Purpose

This pilot study aims to investigate how parents use electronic resources to encourage children’s reading and learning interests through the 5E instructional model. Moreover, this study explores the public’s current electronic reading (e-reading) preferences, parents’ teaching process and the effectiveness of electronic resources in encouraging children to read and learn.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a quantitative research method with a 5- to 10-min online survey based on the 5E instructional model. A total of 101 respondents participated in the survey.

Findings

Technology has changed the public’s current e-reading preferences. More than 65% of parent respondents preferred to use the electronic reading format for their children’s teaching and learning. Parents generally agreed on the teaching and learning effectiveness of using electronic resources, especially for engaging their children. However, the parents showed no significant gender differences.

Originality/value

This pilot study is a new attempt to use the 5E instructional model to quantitatively analyse the parenting process of using electronic resources to encourage children to read and learn, especially in an Asian context.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2022

Philip John Archard, Emma Giles, Isobel Moore, Sewanu Awhangansi, Siobhan Fitzpatrick, Leanne Kulik and Michelle O’Reilly

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from a service evaluation undertaken within a single specialist child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) team…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from a service evaluation undertaken within a single specialist child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) team. The team works closely with local authority children’s services to serve specific populations recognised as experiencing higher levels of mental health need, including children living in alternative care and with adoptive families. The evaluation sought to better understand the experience of this provision during the COVID-19 pandemic and concomitant increase in remote and digitally mediated care delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis of the accounts of 38 parents, carers and professionals involved with the team gathered via telephone interviews and email and postal questionnaires.

Findings

Similar views were expressed from participants involved with the team before and following the onset of the pandemic. Overall, satisfaction was high; however, changes in care appeared more challenging for those already involved with the team before the pandemic. Differences in experience between groups were also evident. Whereas foster carers’ accounts were generally appreciative of the involvement of clinicians, particularly regarding clinician–patient relationships, amongst adoptive parents and members of children’s birth families there were more mixed and negative impressions.

Originality/value

Locally based service evaluations can help inform care pathway planning in specialist CAMHS provision as part of wider quality improvement initiatives. This is especially relevant considering the repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic and as the longer-term acceptability of remote working practices is appraised.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2022

Abraham Stefanidis, Margaret E. King-Sears, Lina Gilic and Vasilis Strogilos

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between (1) employed parents' work–family conflict (WFC), (2) their children with disabilities' support…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between (1) employed parents' work–family conflict (WFC), (2) their children with disabilities' support needs, (3) their children's age, and (4) those parents' levels of school engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 193 US parents of children with disabilities who completed a survey regarding work and family strain as well as school engagement. Descriptive statistical and correlational analyses were used, followed by moderated regression analysis.

Findings

Results indicate that higher levels of WFC have a negative impact on parents' school engagement. Similarly, children with disabilities' increased needs for parental support have a negative impact on school engagement. Moreover, the age of children with disabilities holds a moderating role in the relationship between support needs and school engagement.

Research limitations/implications

Human resource managers can acquire information regarding employed parents of children with disabilities' increased support needs and formalize flexible policies leading to supportive workplace cultures. School personnel can instigate a range of options that facilitate parents' school engagement, such as maximizing use of technology via virtual meetings and activities.

Originality/value

These innovative findings contribute to theoretical underpinnings in work and family strain research as well as conservation of resources theory, given the lack of previous empirical work specific to children with disabilities and their employed parents.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Virginia Blakey and Jane Frankland

Finds research shows that while parents are potentially an important source of information and support to their children on sexual issues, in practice many parents feel…

1860

Abstract

Finds research shows that while parents are potentially an important source of information and support to their children on sexual issues, in practice many parents feel that they lack the skills and confidence to play a direct role in these matters. Presents findings from a pilot project undertaken by Health Promotion Wales and FPA Cymru to enhance parents’ sex education skills. Details a series of workshops which were run for groups of parents with differing needs in relation to their children’s sex education. Describes how participants took part in pre‐workshop interviews to identify their concerns and in post‐workshop interviews to assess the impact of the workshops. Presents findings from the workshop evaluations, together with some lessons learned from the project. Advises that the long‐term outcome of the project, a resource pack on sex education for parents, is now available.

Details

Health Education, vol. 96 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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