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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2019

Marina Romeo, Montserrat Yepes-Baldó, Miguel Ángel Piñeiro, Kristina Westerberg and Maria Nordin

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the moderation effect of over-commitment in the job crafting–well-being relationship, in the elderly care sector in Spain.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the moderation effect of over-commitment in the job crafting–well-being relationship, in the elderly care sector in Spain.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional design was implemented and a final sample of 353 participants were assessed using the Job Crafting Questionnaire, an adaptation of the Over-commitment Scale from the Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire, and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12).

Findings

A positive interaction between relational and task crafting and over-commitment is observed in the prediction of well-being levels. Specifically, the effect of over-commitment in the task crafting–well-being relationship proved to be statistically significant when opposed to low, medium and high levels of over-commitment. Additionally, the effect of over-commitment in the relational crafting–well-being relationship proved to be statistically significant only when opposed to medium and high levels of over-commitment. Finally, a direct and simple effect was observed between cognitive crafting and well-being, not moderated by over-commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Implementation of non-behavioral measurements, and a non-longitudinal design are suggested. The development of behavioral measures for job crafting is encouraged, along with the implementation of longitudinal designs sensitive to changes in over-commitment. Possible over-commitment results are biased by an economically contracted environment.

Practical implications

Job crafting training, over-commitment early detection and further research on job crafting strategies’ preferences are suggested.

Originality/value

The moderating role of over-commitment in the job crafting–well-being relationship in the elderly care sector represents one of these attempts to better understand evidences of how work-related efforts modify a worker’s psychological functioning and adaptation, which is the reason why, specially in contexts of uncertainty, its study becomes relevant.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 September 2018

Maria Nordin, Marina Romeo, Montserrat Yepes-Baldó and Kristina Westerberg

Hierarchical and flat organizational types are predominant in Spain and Sweden, respectively. To study how managers’ commitment and work overcommitment (WOC) affect employee…

1471

Abstract

Purpose

Hierarchical and flat organizational types are predominant in Spain and Sweden, respectively. To study how managers’ commitment and work overcommitment (WOC) affect employee well-being, and job perception in these different countries can shed insight on how to improve eldercare organization. The purpose of this paper was to study the association between eldercare employee exposure to managers’ commitment and WOC, and employee mental well-being and job perception and how these associations differed between Spain and Sweden.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire with validated questions on commitment, WOC, mental well-being and job perception, operationalized as the perception of quality of care and turnover intent, was sent out to eldercare managers and employees in Spain and Sweden. t-Tests, χ2 and linear regression were applied to study the associations and differences between the countries.

Findings

Interaction analyses revealed that Spanish employees’ mental well-being and job perception were influenced by their managers’ commitment and WOC in that manager commitment improved and WOC impaired well-being and job perception. However, the Swedish eldercare employees were not influenced by their managers on these parameters.

Practical implications

The impact of managerial commitment and WOC differed between employees in Spain and Sweden, possibly because the preconditions for leadership varied due to differences in organizational type.

Originality/value

This study compares the managers’ impact on employee health and job perception in two countries with different organizational prerequisites. Moreover, managers’ commitment and WOC were estimated by the managers themselves and did not rely on the employees’ perception, which improved ecological validity.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Esther Hauer, Annika M. Nordlund and Kristina Westerberg

The purpose of this paper is to examine the learning climate in elderly care, its potential improvements after the “Steps for skills”, and its influence on knowledge from formal…

1028

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the learning climate in elderly care, its potential improvements after the “Steps for skills”, and its influence on knowledge from formal training. The assumptions were: the different activities of the Steps for skills should enhance the perceived learning climate; differences in working conditions in home help and residential homes should influence the perceived learning climate and its improvements; and changes in the perception of the learning climate should bring changes in the perceived usefulness of new knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is a case study carried out in the public elderly care in Sweden, and used a repeated measurements design. A total of 270 nursing assistants answered a questionnaire at Time I, and 174 at Time II.

Findings

Results show no improvements of the learning climate for the full sample. When contrasting the learning climate in home help services and in residential homes significant differences are found, and also a tendency for their learning climate to change in opposite directions. The perception of the learning climate seems to influence the perceived usefulness of new knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was from one single organization.

Practical implications

Developmental interventions should take in to consideration that context matters, and that the perceived learning climate influences the use of new knowledge.

Originality/value

In this study, a 15‐items learning climate scale (LCS) is presented. Another contribution is identifying working condition failure as a potential explanation to why interventions usually do not result in expected changes.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Kristina Westerberg and Esther Hauer

The overall aim of the present study was to investigate the learning climate and work group skills perceived by managers and their subordinates in the municipal elderly care…

1838

Abstract

Purpose

The overall aim of the present study was to investigate the learning climate and work group skills perceived by managers and their subordinates in the municipal elderly care, prior to a development project. The specific research questions were: Are managers' and their subordinates' perceptions of the learning climate related? and Does the manager's assessment of the work group skills correlate with the work group's perception of the learning climate?

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 12 managers and 130 of their subordinates were selected, and answered a questionnaire. The subordinates belonged to work groups with five to 19 care assistants working in elderly care. The majority of the participants were women (92 per cent). The mean age was 43 years old, range 20‐63.

Findings

Results suggest that the perception of the learning climate has a correspondence between the organisational levels (managers and their subordinates) and that there is a correspondence between managers' ratings of work group skills, in particular skills for effectively managing change, and the work groups' perception of their learning climate, in particular decision autonomy and developmental and collaborative potentials.

Research implications/limitations

The manager sample was small and from one single organisation.

Practical implications

The relations between the learning climate and the assessment of staff skills are important to the actions taken in order to facilitate workplace learning and development.

Originality/value

This study contrasted the managers' assessment of skills with their work groups' perceptions of learning climate, which is quite unusual in learning climate studies.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 21 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Kristina Westerberg and Susanne Tafvelin

The purpose of the this study was to explore the development of commitment to change among leaders in the home help services during organizational change and to study this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the this study was to explore the development of commitment to change among leaders in the home help services during organizational change and to study this development in relation to workload and stress. During organizational change initiatives, commitment to change among leaders is important to ensure the implementation of the change. However, little is known of development of commitment of change over time.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a qualitative design with semi-structured interviews with ten leaders by the time an organizational change initiative was launched and follow-up one year later. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze the interviews.

Findings

Commitment to change is not static, but seems to develop over time and during organizational change. At the first interview, leaders had a varied pattern reflecting different dimensions of commitment to change. One year later, the differences between leaders’ commitment to change was less obvious. Differences in commitment to change had no apparent relationship with workload or stress.

Research limitations/implications

The data were collected from one organization, and the number of participants were small which could affect the results on workload and stress in relation to commitment to change.

Practical implications

It is important to support leaders during organizational change initiatives to maintain their commitment. One way to accomplish this is to use management team meetings to monitor how leaders perceive their situation.

Originality/value

Qualitative, longitudinal and leader studies on commitment to change are all unusual, and taken together, this study shows new aspects of commitment.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Jennifer Bowerman

106

Abstract

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Sara Cervai and Tauno Kekäle

374

Abstract

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Sara Cervai and Tauno Kekale

375

Abstract

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 21 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Cristina Fernandes, João Ferreira and Marta Peris-Ortiz

The purpose of this paper is to provide interested parties with the means of grasping how the literature on open innovation has evolved over the course of time. In this way, the…

1261

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide interested parties with the means of grasping how the literature on open innovation has evolved over the course of time. In this way, the authors furthermore contribute towards a better understanding, scaling and positioning of this field of research.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies a combination of bibliometric techniques, such as citations, co-citations and social network analysis in order to map the scientific domain of open innovation. Currently, bibliometric analysis represents a methodology in effect on a global scale to evaluate the existing state of fields of research (Mutschke et al., 2011). This spans the application of quantitative and statistical analysis to publications such as articles and their respective citations and serving to evaluate the performance of research through returning data on all of the activities ongoing in a scientific field with summaries of these data generating a broad perspective on the research activities and impacts, especially as regards the researchers, journals, countries and universities (Hawkins, 1977; Osareh, 1996; Thomsom Reuters, 2008).

Findings

This research aims to map and analyse the intellectual knowledge held on open innovation. To this end, the authors carried out a bibliometric study with recourse to co-citations. Based on cluster and factorial analyses, it is possible identify and classify the several theoretical perspectives on open innovation across six areas: open innovation concept, open innovation and networks, open innovation and knowledge, open Innovation, and innovation spillovers, open innovation management and open innovation and technology.

Originality/value

This paper aims to map and analyse the intellectual knowledge held on open innovation.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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