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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Ahmad Raza, Hasan Murad and Ashraf Kayani

The purpose of this paper is to explore different cultural dimensions of the learning climate at a business school located at Lahore, Pakistan.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore different cultural dimensions of the learning climate at a business school located at Lahore, Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports the result of an empirical study of the learning climate for managerial knowledge at a business school, located in Lahore, Pakistan. A sample of 150 MBA students were asked to respond to a self‐designed learning climate scale, in order to assess their perceptions of the learning climate. The study has attempted to measure five dimensions of learning climate, which include culture, learning styles, resources, methodology and environment. In addition to that, we intend to describe the patterns of effective learning climate for business knowledge by the students of the school amid dynamic challenges of globalization and diversity.

Findings

The study revealed that students highly regarded school culture and trust of stakeholders in defining learning climate.

Research limitations/implications

First, this paper reports the results of a business school located in a developing country. Second, the results presented in this paper have important implications for those engaged in the strategic management of business education in Pakistan and other developing countries of South Asia and Africa due similar socio‐economic contexts.

Originality/value

The study is first of its kind conducted on a Pakistani business school. It brings forth significant cultural dimensions of learning climate in a developing country.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2022

Laura Smeets, Wim Gijselaers, Roger Meuwissen and Therese Grohnert

Learning from errors is a complex process that requires careful support. Building on affective events theory, the purpose of this paper is to explore how a supportive…

Abstract

Purpose

Learning from errors is a complex process that requires careful support. Building on affective events theory, the purpose of this paper is to explore how a supportive learning from error climate can contribute to social learning from errors through affective and cognitive error responses by individual professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 139 early-career auditors completed an online questionnaire consisting of validated survey scales, allowing for serial mediation analysis to compare direct and indirect effects.

Findings

Learning from error climate was directly and positively related to engagement in social learning activities after committing an error. Furthermore, the authors found a double mediation by error strain (an affective error response) and reflecting on errors (a cognitive error response) on this relationship.

Practical implications

Organizations can actively encourage professionals to learn from their errors by creating a supportive learning from error climate and holding professionals accountable for their errors.

Originality/value

The present study enriches the authors’ understanding of the mechanisms through which learning from error climate influences engagement in social learning activities. It extends prior research on learning from errors by investigating the sequential effects of engagement in error-related learning activities performed individually and in social interaction.

Article
Publication date: 19 November 2021

Muhammad Qamar Zia, Tobias M. Huning, Aamir Feroz Shamsi, Muhammad Naveed and Riaz Ahmed Mangi

The goal of this study was to examine the mediating mechanism of informal learning between dimensions of learning climate and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). In…

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this study was to examine the mediating mechanism of informal learning between dimensions of learning climate and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). In addition, the study also aimed to investigate the learning climate, in the dimensions of learning facilitation, learning appreciation and error avoidance as antecedents of informal learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were gathered from sports items manufacturing small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Sialkot, Pakistan. Sialkot is home to manufacturing businesses that export their products worldwide. Survey data of 318 middle managers collected at 2 different times were used for testing the research model using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

The results demonstrate that facilitation and appreciation learning climate have a positive relationship with informal learning and error-avoidance has a negative relationship with informal learning. The analysis also revealed that informal learning mediated the linkage between learning climate dimensions and OCB. Moreover, informal learning is significantly related to OCB.

Practical implications

HR practitioners and organizational leaders of SMEs can use, encourage and promote informal learning to improve the skills and knowledge of employees at low cost. For instance, management should strategically implement informal learning at the workplace by providing a supportive learning climate.

Originality/value

Previous studies have overlooked the impact of informal learning on OCB and its mediating effect. The present study addresses this gap by examining the mediating mechanism of informal learning between learning climate and OCB.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Kjell Gronhaug and Robert Stone

Twenty years ago, Senge's, 1990 pioneering article, ”The learning organization,” published in MIT's Sloan Management Review, received center‐stage attention. The concept…

4273

Abstract

Purpose

Twenty years ago, Senge's, 1990 pioneering article, ”The learning organization,” published in MIT's Sloan Management Review, received center‐stage attention. The concept received much support and was followed with articles by prominent writers and educators, Margaret Wheatley amongst them. Only ten years later, however, another prominent writer and educator, David Garvin, remarked, “Learning organizations have been embraced in theory but are still surprisingly rare.” The purpose of this paper is to argue and present support for a perspective that learning organizations have existed for over 100 years. Linking this concept to the past versus arguing that learning organizations are new will better pave the way for learning organizations to achieve a status of being more than simply “embraced in theory.”

Design/methodology/approach

Three objectives were presented. The first developed an historical link, with the goal of showing that learning organizations have had a rich history and did not simply appear in 1990. The approach to the second was based on drawing implications from literature about the learning process. The very heart of competitiveness depends on how firm members experience the learning process. The process is a function of the use of tools (T) within a learning climate (C) and their interaction (T x C). The approach to the third objective was to conceptualize learning climate dimensions, old compared to new learning organizations.

Findings

First, the idea that learning is always a competitiveness issue has not been consistently advanced in the literature, if hardly at all. Second, the internal learning climates within firms are what is at the heart of other cultures' successes. Much time has been spent studying the tools used in these firms, for instance quality circles, but little time with the climate learning dimension. The climate dimension has been the reason for their success.

Originality/value

The paper presents a tools/climate learning dimensions matrix (a 2x2 matrix) and develops the understanding that all learning stems from two learning dimensions, tools, and the learning dimension, climate, within which the tools are employed. Within this discussion, the authors present the idea of the competitive advantage of cultures; this advantage appearing in a firm as a consequence of the “climate learning dimension” of various cultures. The concluding section of the paper presents five climate dimensions; those of yesterday compared with those of today. These well known management perspectives (e.g. single loop learning/double loop learning, independence/interdependence) are linked to the learning process with a special focus on the climate dimension of the process. It is there that the degree of the firm's competitiveness is enhanced.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Mei-Ling Wang

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of learning climate on customer-oriented behaviors by incorporating salespeople’s customer knowledge in the banks. It…

1125

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of learning climate on customer-oriented behaviors by incorporating salespeople’s customer knowledge in the banks. It also explores the mediating role of customer knowledge between learning climate and customer-oriented behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual two-level model that links learning climate to customer-oriented behaviors was developed and tested using data collected from salespeople and customers in banks in Taiwan. Data from 444 customers involving 92 salespeople was collected via a questionnaire and analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling.

Findings

The results show that learning climate encourages salespeople to develop customer knowledge and customer-oriented behaviors, and that salespeople’s customer knowledge positively influences customer-oriented behaviors. This study also provides empirical support for the hypotheses that learning climate helps salespeople increase customer-oriented behaviors through improving salespeople’s customer knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

The findings highlight the importance of enhancing learning climate and customer knowledge to enable banks to improve salespeople’s customer-oriented behaviors. This research also points to customer knowledge as mediating mechanisms that can explain the association between learning climate and customer-oriented behaviors in the sales context.

Originality/value

By integrating knowledge management with organizational learning research, this study evaluates the effect of learning climate on salespeople’s customer-oriented behaviors by incorporating their customer knowledge. In addition, the present study points to salespeople’s customer knowledge as one of several mediating mechanisms that explains the association between learning climate and customer-oriented behaviors.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Kristina Westerberg and Esther Hauer

The overall aim of the present study was to investigate the learning climate and work group skills perceived by managers and their subordinates in the municipal elderly…

1792

Abstract

Purpose

The overall aim of the present study was to investigate the learning climate and work group skills perceived by managers and their subordinates in the municipal elderly care, prior to a development project. The specific research questions were: Are managers' and their subordinates' perceptions of the learning climate related? and Does the manager's assessment of the work group skills correlate with the work group's perception of the learning climate?

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 12 managers and 130 of their subordinates were selected, and answered a questionnaire. The subordinates belonged to work groups with five to 19 care assistants working in elderly care. The majority of the participants were women (92 per cent). The mean age was 43 years old, range 20‐63.

Findings

Results suggest that the perception of the learning climate has a correspondence between the organisational levels (managers and their subordinates) and that there is a correspondence between managers' ratings of work group skills, in particular skills for effectively managing change, and the work groups' perception of their learning climate, in particular decision autonomy and developmental and collaborative potentials.

Research implications/limitations

The manager sample was small and from one single organisation.

Practical implications

The relations between the learning climate and the assessment of staff skills are important to the actions taken in order to facilitate workplace learning and development.

Originality/value

This study contrasted the managers' assessment of skills with their work groups' perceptions of learning climate, which is quite unusual in learning climate studies.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 21 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Nasima Mohamed Hoosen Carrim and Johan Schutte Basson

The purpose of this study is to ascertain whether there were differences in how one public and two private South African organizations created a learning climate.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to ascertain whether there were differences in how one public and two private South African organizations created a learning climate.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is based on a survey and comparative analysis of specific departments in a chemical and gas company, an insurance company, and a semi‐private state‐owned organization (SPSOO) to establish dimensions that foster the creation of a learning climate.

Findings

The findings indicated that management support, autonomy and responsibility, time, the opportunity to develop, and guidelines to access information were pivotal in the creation of a learning climate and varied across organizations.

Research limitations/implications

The results indicated that variations across departments within each of these three organizations relating to employees' perceptions of a learning climate were not considered.

Practical implications

The study revealed that a learning climate can be created in different types of organizations through organizational, group and individual drivers. It further revealed that the strategy in creating a climate of learning should be aligned with the organization's structure, culture and goals.

Originality/value

This article makes a contribution to the literature on talent development in organizations as it indicates that different strategies can be utilized in successfully creating a learning climate in different types of organizations.

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Larry Hearld, Allyson Hall, Reena Joseph Kelly, Aizhan Karabukayeva and Jasvinder Singh

The purpose of this study was to examine the organizational context that may support learning and change readiness climates that previous research has found to be…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the organizational context that may support learning and change readiness climates that previous research has found to be conducive to implementing evidence-based interventions.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory, mixed method evaluation that included 15 rheumatology clinics throughout the United States was performed. Quantitative data were collected using a web-based survey completed by 135 clinic members. Qualitative data were collected via semi-structured interviews with 88 clinic members.

Findings

In general, clinics reported strong, positive learning and change readiness climates. More complex organizations (e.g. multispecialty, academic medical centers) with rational/hierarchical cultures and members with longer tenure were associated with less supportive learning and change readiness climates. The authors’ findings highlight opportunities for organizational leaders and evidence-based intervention sponsors to focus their attention and allocate resources to settings that may be most susceptible to implementation challenges.

Originality/value

First, the authors address a deficit in previous research by describing both the level and strength of the learning and change readiness climates for implementing an evidence-based shared decision-making aid (SDMA) and examine how these vary as a function of the organizational context. Second, the study examines a broader set of factors to assess the organizational context (e.g. organizational culture, organizational structure, ownership) than previous research, which may be especially salient for shaping the climate in smaller specialty clinics like those we study. Third, the authors utilize a mixed methods analysis to provide greater insights into questions of how and why organizational factors such as size and structure may influence the learning and change readiness climate.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 June 2021

Adebayo Agbejule, Jukka Rapo and Lotta Saarikoski

This study examines the relationship between trust, organizational climate and team learning among project team members (PTM). In recent years, many companies have come to…

2733

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the relationship between trust, organizational climate and team learning among project team members (PTM). In recent years, many companies have come to recognize the important role team learning plays in achieving competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a survey questionnaire, and responses from 86 PTM provide support for the research model and demonstrate that how organizational climate mediates the relationship between trust and team learning.

Findings

The structural equation analysis of the data collected from 86 project team members indicate that both vertical and horizontal trust influences organizational climate, which, in turn, is a determinant of team learning. In addition, although both types of trust contributed to organizational climate, the results indicated that horizontal trust had a greater influence on organizational climate and team learning.

Research limitations/implications

The study employed the survey method and is not without limitations. The first limitation concerns our sample size, which was selected from one global company. Second, the survey data were all collected at a single point in time. Therefore, the authors cannot unambiguously infer causality. To attempt to do so, it would be useful to investigate the model in the context of organizational and development change. Despite these limitations, the results of the study have implications for theory and practice.

Practical implications

The implication for theory is that the results provide empirical support for the view that organization climates mediate the relationship between trust and team learning. On the practical side, the organizations should also pay more attention to increasing trust at the work place, especially among PTM that may contribute to favorable organizational climate, which is vital for team learning.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the simultaneous role of vertical and horizontal trust on organizational climate and how it contributes to team learning. The results indicate that organizations emphasis on horizontal trust can plays a vital role in team learning, which is a contribution to enhancing teamwork and performance in organizations.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Renato J. Orsato, Simone R. Barakat and José Guilherme F. de Campos

This paper aims to investigate how organizational learning (OL) affects the development of anticipatory adaptation to climate change in companies. Because the need to learn

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how organizational learning (OL) affects the development of anticipatory adaptation to climate change in companies. Because the need to learn increases in circumstances of greater uncertainty such as the case of climate change, one of the processes that can explain different levels of anticipatory adaptation to climate change (AACC) by companies is OL.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses a case study design. Following the procedures of qualitative sampling, an exemplary case of organizational adaptation to climate change in a sector that is extremely affected by the impacts of weather events was chosen. Empirical data collection includes semi-structured interviews and the collection of private and public documents. Such data were analyzed through thematic analysis.

Findings

The process of OL for anticipatory adaptation to climate change presents substantial differences from the traditional OL process presented by the specialized literature. In particular, the concepts of single- and double-loop learning were challenging to fit into the learning processes required for AACC.

Originality/value

Organizations have historically been working towards the adaption to external unforeseen events, but anticipatory adaptation to climate change presents new challenges and requires new forms of learning. Previous research has examined the interplay between learning and climate change adaptation, especially at the inter-organizational level. By developing research at the organizational level, this paper addresses a gap in the literature and shows that the required learning to adapt to climate change differs from the traditional learning, described in the management literature.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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