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Article

Chao‐Sen Wu, Cheng‐Jong Lee and Li‐Fen Tsai

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of technological creativity for sports and knowledge sharing on individual performance, and to analyze the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of technological creativity for sports and knowledge sharing on individual performance, and to analyze the correlation among creativity for sports technologies, knowledge sharing, and individual performance, via the mediating effect of athletes' self‐efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study selected 250 current athletes, including tennis players, track and field athletes, volleyball players, etc. as the subjects. Statistical methods, such as Cronbach's α, factor analysis, Pearson's correlation, regression analysis, and path analysis, were used to perform analyses.

Findings

It was found that among the technological creativity for sports, athletes' creativity and analytic capacity had significant positive influence on task performance and team performance in athletes' individual performance. In other words, the improvement in athletes' self‐efficacy may improve their creativity and level of technological capacity, which further improves team performance and task performance.

Originality/value

For coaches it is necessary to constantly strengthen athletes' self‐efficacy and provide them with the space for the development of creativity and technological capacity in order to specifically improve their athletic performance. This study integrated relevant theories of technological creativity with those of self‐efficacy to investigate issues regarding improvements in athletes' performance. At present, there is a lack of relevant studies on technological creativity for sports. The research results can serve as a reference to future studies for continuous clarification of investigations into technological creativity for sports.

Details

Journal of Technology Management in China, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8779

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Article

Ashish Kalra, Raj Agnihotri, Rakesh Singh, Sandeep Puri and Narendra Kumar

Although the role of self-leadership is important, it remains understudied in business-to-business (B2B) selling context. This study aims to provide insights into the…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the role of self-leadership is important, it remains understudied in business-to-business (B2B) selling context. This study aims to provide insights into the drivers and outcomes of behavioral self-leadership tested through a sample working in pharmaceutical sales in an emerging economy. In accord, the authors investigate the relationships between self-efficacy, behavioral self-leadership, adaptive selling and ultimately sales performance. This study also investigates the moderating role of technical knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from 208 salespeople working in pharmaceutical industry. AMOS 21.0 and SmartPLS3.0 were utilized to test the conceptual framework.

Findings

The study finds that self-efficacy is positively related to behavioral self-leadership that in turn is positively related to adaptive selling and sales performance. In addition, counter intuitive findings were uncovered related to salesperson’s technical knowledge. Those with high technical knowledge exhibited weaker relationship between self-efficacy and behavioral self-leadership, behavioral self-leadership and adaptive selling and that between behavioral self-leadership and sales performance than their counterparts with low technical knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends work on self-leadership by exploring the effect of self-efficacy and behavioral self-leadership on sales performance. This study also extends the theory on salesperson’s knowledge by proposing the counter-intuitive effect of knowledge and self-efficacy and knowledge and behavioral self-leadership on adaptive selling and sales performance.

Practical implications

Sales managers should consider that not all employees indulging in behavioral self-leadership would reap benefits from the same. As such, sales managers should assess the level of technical knowledge of the salesforce and when determining their training programs that develop such self-leadership skills.

Originality/value

The study is one of the first to consider the drivers and outcomes of behavioral self-leadership and technical knowledge in a B2B sales context. By focusing on the interplay between knowledge and self-efficacy and knowledge and behavioral self-leadership, this study provides greater understanding of the effects of behavioral self-leadership than previously expected by sales researchers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Donata Sobakinova, Yan Zhou and Dilawar Khan Durrani

Despite the existence of a vast body of research on entrepreneurship, little is known about why some entrepreneurs are able to generate and realize more business ideas…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the existence of a vast body of research on entrepreneurship, little is known about why some entrepreneurs are able to generate and realize more business ideas than others. This study aims to present a prospective answer to this question by empirically examining the relationships among human capital outcomes (entrepreneurial knowledge and skills) and the number of business ideas generated and implemented. Additionally, the authors examined the moderating effect of the entrepreneurial self-efficacy on the proposed relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A statistical analysis on a sample of 340 Russian entrepreneurs was conducted.

Findings

The results from the analysis indicated that human capital outcomes (entrepreneurial knowledge and skills) are positively related to the number of generated and implemented ideas. Furthermore, it was seen that entrepreneurial self-efficacy significantly moderates the relationship between human capital outcomes and the number of implemented ideas. However, self-efficacy has no significant moderating effect on the relationships among human capital outcomes and the number of generated ideas. Finally, the results showed that the number of ideas generated mediates the relationships among human capital outcomes and the number of ideas implemented.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no previous study has investigated the combination of such variables as entrepreneurial human capital outcomes, entrepreneurial self-efficacy and the number of new business ideas. This paper investigates this gap in the literature with an empirical analysis of the relations between the mentioned variables based on data collected from Russian entrepreneurs.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article

Megan Ann McCoy, Kenneth J. White and Kim Love

There is a paucity of empirical research that explores the financial well-being of collegiate student-athletes. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the key aspects…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a paucity of empirical research that explores the financial well-being of collegiate student-athletes. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the key aspects of financial well-being (e.g. financial knowledge, financial self-efficacy and finance-related stress levels) of varsity athletes at US colleges and universities.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used data from the National Student Financial Wellness Study. The data were analyzed using general linear regression models.

Findings

The findings suggest student-athletes have lower financial knowledge than students who are non-athletes. Despite their lower levels of financial knowledge, these student-athletes report higher levels of financial self-efficacy. Furthermore, even when controlling for scholarship funding, student-athletes reported lower levels of financial stress than their counterparts. One could interpret this as student-athletes having a false sense of confidence in their money management behaviors. This overconfidence can impact many areas of their overall financial well-being. Alternatively, non-athletes may not be as financially confident as they should be.

Research limitations/implications

This study could be replicated with stronger measures (e.g. Financial Self-Efficacy Scale), with the inclusion of subjective financial knowledge measures, comparing the impact of demographic variables. As, most financial constructs have gender differences (Farrell et al., 2016) and race differences (Amatucci and Crawley, 2011) and depend upon college major (Fosnacht and Calderone, 2017). Another limitation of this study is the small percentage of student-athletes, a common problem with research in this area. Further research is also needed to unpack the finding that self-efficacy decreases at higher levels of financial knowledge.

Practical implications

It is evident that college students (athletes/non-athletes) need financial education. For universities and college coaches, this study could be used as a rationale for providing financial education for their athletes. The addition of financial courses could be used as a recruiting tool for collegiate coaches and benefit the university. Requiring financial education could also benefit universities long term as it may potentially increase the donor possibilities by alumni. As a final note, it is important that financial courses figure out ways to improve financial self-efficacy alongside financial knowledge, as findings suggest both are integral to decreasing financial stress.

Social implications

Less than 4 percent of universities in the USA require students to take a personal finance course (Bledsoe et al., 2016). If more universities included personal finance as a graduation requirement and did more to engage student-athletes (and non-athletes) in financial planning, then the average level of financial knowledge would likely improve on campuses across the USA. In addition, increasing young adults financial self-efficacy could improve financial stress which is linked to mental health and physical health.

Originality/value

This study provides the first empirical look into the financial well-being of collegiate student-athletes across the USA. Although there are many benefits to participation in college sports, student-athletes face additional time pressures and a predisposition to clustering around certain majors. Findings suggest that collegiate athletes need additional support around their financial literacy and non-athletes may need support developing financial self-efficacy. These two findings should be used by academic institutions and athletic departments to determine how to encourage financial health in their student-athletes and general student body.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article

Megan Lee Endres, Steven P. Endres, Sanjib K. Chowdhury and Intakhab Alam

The purpose of this paper is to apply the self‐efficacy model to compare knowledge‐sharing activities in the Open Source community versus those in a traditional organization.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the self‐efficacy model to compare knowledge‐sharing activities in the Open Source community versus those in a traditional organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Current literature on tacit knowledge sharing and information about the Open Source community is synthesized in the study with research concerning self‐efficacy formation. The knowledge‐sharing literature is applied in the paper to the self‐efficacy model.

Findings

Through a synthesis of different streams of literature, the paper concludes that the self‐efficacy model serves as a useful framework for better understanding the effects of context on tacit knowledge sharing. Furthermore, it is concluded that the Open Source community may provide an ideal set of subjects to whom the model can be applied.

Research limitations/implications

Only propositions are offered, and the conclusions are suggestions for future research. The self‐efficacy model has been successfully applied to other areas of research in early stages (e.g. entrepreneurship) and provides a valid, tangible framework that allows many research possibilities.

Practical implications

The self‐efficacy model is practical and usable in a real‐world situation. A software manager (or other manager) can easily look at the inputs and outcomes of the model and see where he/she could positively affect tacit knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

This paper takes a highly valid and respected model and applies it to individual tacit knowledge sharing, a field in which little cross‐discipline work is done. This paper bridges a central organizational behavior/psychological theory with knowledge management research.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article

Yu-Wei Chang, Ping-Yu Hsu, Wen-Lung Shiau and Ronghua Yi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how customer power of environmental factors affects customer support (CS) engineers’ personal motivations in a knowledge

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how customer power of environmental factors affects customer support (CS) engineers’ personal motivations in a knowledge-sharing context. The authors examine extrinsic (i.e. organizational rewards, reputation, and reciprocity) and intrinsic motivations (i.e. knowledge self-efficacy) affecting knowledge-sharing intentions based on the social exchange theory (SET) and self-efficacy theory. Furthermore, the authors introduce the concept of the social power theory to investigate the moderating effect of customer power on the relationships between personal motivations and knowledge-sharing intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collects 349 questionnaires of CS engineers from 16 countries, including the USA, China, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. After the data collection, the research model and hypotheses are tested using partial least squares.

Findings

The empirical results show that reputation, reciprocity, and knowledge self-efficacy are significantly and positively related to knowledge-sharing intentions. Also, the results show that customer power can significantly moderate the relationships between personal motivations and knowledge-sharing intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The findings help multinational corporations employ the perception of customer power to motivate CS engineers to share knowledge. Especially, the results can help organizations increase customer added value through effective knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

The research model integrates personal motivations derived from the SET and self-efficacy theory and customer power of environmental factors. Additionally, this study is the first to investigate the moderating effect of customer power on employees’ personal motivations and behavioral intentions.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 67 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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Article

Hsi‐Peng Lu and Kuo‐Lun Hsiao

Weblogs, or blogs, have been a significant new development in recent years. Many businesses have begun using blogs to stimulate discussions, garner ideas, and provide…

Abstract

Purpose

Weblogs, or blogs, have been a significant new development in recent years. Many businesses have begun using blogs to stimulate discussions, garner ideas, and provide further visibility. Thus, blog usage as well as individual motives behind continued usage is an important area of research. This research aims to examine behavioral motivations underlying individual intention to keep using blogs.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on social cognitive theory and related technology adoption literature, this study considered knowledge self‐efficacy, subjective norms, feedback, and personal outcome expectations as the determinants of continuing to share information on blogs. The proposed model was empirically evaluated using randomized survey data collected from 155 users of a popular web site in Taiwan (WRETCH blog).

Findings

The results revealed that although both self‐efficacy and personal outcome expectations affected directly the intention of sharing information on blogs, personal outcome expectations had stronger impacts on behavioral intention. In addition, social persuasion has no direct but indirect impact via self‐efficacy and personal outcome expectations on the intention of sharing information.

Practical implications

This study contributes to a theoretical understanding of the factors that promote the usage of weblogs. For web log service providers, the results help them better develop tools to enhance people's intention to share information.

Originality/value

The paper verifies the effect of knowledge self‐efficacy, personal outcome expectations, and social persuasion on the behavior of blog users. Furthermore, verifies the determinants of knowledge self‐efficacy.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article

Zhen Shao, Tienan Wang and Yuqiang Feng

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact mechanism of organizational culture (OC) on Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) user’s explicit and tacit knowledge

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact mechanism of organizational culture (OC) on Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) user’s explicit and tacit knowledge-sharing behavior in the context of enterprise systems usage.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from social cognitive theory, the authors developed a comprehensive model that integrates OC, computer self-efficacy and employees’ knowledge-sharing behaviors. In total, 343 valid questionnaires were collected from ERP users of 115 firms and structural equation modeling technique was used to test the model.

Findings

Empirical results suggest that hierarchical culture that focusses on efficacy and uniformity is positively related with employees’ explicit knowledge sharing; group culture that focusses on trust and belonging is positively related with employees’ tacit knowledge sharing, and their relationship is fully mediated by employees’ computer self-efficacy. In addition, computer self-efficacy also partially mediates the relationship between rational culture and employees’ knowledge sharing.

Practical implications

This study provides guidelines for top managers to enhance employees’ computer self-efficacy and facilitate employees’ knowledge-sharing behavior by developing appropriate type of OC.

Originality/value

This study unpacks the mediating mechanism between OC and knowledge sharing, and contributes to the academic research of knowledge management in the context of enterprise systems assimilation.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 115 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article

Jenefer Brooke, Roziah Mohd Rasdi and Bahaman Abu Samah

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect relationships between individual-related factors and environmental-related factors with the knowledge

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect relationships between individual-related factors and environmental-related factors with the knowledge sharing behaviour through the mediating role of self-efficacy among successful farmers in selected states in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used survey method and included 241 participants from Johor, Negeri Sembilan and Selangor. The analysis was conducted using the partial least square structural equation modelling to achieve the research objectives.

Findings

The findings indicate that individual-related factors (e.g. enjoyment in helping others, training and prior experience) and environmental-related factors (e.g. social support and trust) have significant influence on the knowledge sharing behaviour. The results also reveal that self-efficacy mediates the relationships between prior experiences (individual-related factor), social support, trust (environmental- related factor) and the knowledge sharing behaviour.

Practical implications

Agriculture officers should emphasize on farmers’ personal and social factors to encourage the knowledge sharing behaviour among the agriculture communities of successful farmers.

Originality/value

The research yields a theoretical framework that outlines the potential of six key factors in explaining the knowledge sharing behaviour among successful farmers. The factors can be considered in developing structured knowledge-sharing programs.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article

Ghulam Ali Arain, Zeeshan Ahmed Bhatti, Imran Hameed and Yu-Hui Fang

This paper aims to examine the consequences for innovative work behavior (IWB) of top-down knowledge hiding – that is, supervisors’ knowledge hiding from supervisees…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the consequences for innovative work behavior (IWB) of top-down knowledge hiding – that is, supervisors’ knowledge hiding from supervisees (SKHS). Drawing on social learning theory, the authors test the three-way moderated-mediation model in which the direct effect of SKHS on IWB is first mediated by self-efficacy and then further moderated by supervisor and supervisee nationality (locals versus foreigners).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected multi-sourced data from 446 matched supervisor-supervisee pairs working in a diverse range of organizations operating in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. After initial data screening, confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to test for the factorial validity of the used measures with AMOS. The hypothesized relationships were tested in regression analysis with SPSS.

Findings

Results showed that SKHS had both direct and mediation effects, via the self-efficacy mediator, on supervisee IWB. The mediation effect was further moderated by supervisor and supervisee nationality (local versus foreigners), which highlighted that the effect was stronger for supervisor–supervisee pairs that were local-local or foreigner-foreigner than for pairs that were local-foreigner or foreigner-local.

Originality/value

This study contributes to both knowledge hiding and IWB literature and discusses the useful theoretical and practical implications of the findings.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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