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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Steven H. Appelbaum and Alan Hare

Provides a comprehensive literature overview of the concept and use of self‐efficacy (a person’s self‐belief in his or her ability to perform specific tasks) as a…

Abstract

Provides a comprehensive literature overview of the concept and use of self‐efficacy (a person’s self‐belief in his or her ability to perform specific tasks) as a theoretical construct, emerging from Bandura’s social learning (social cognition) theory. Examines, specifically, how self‐efficacy may be perceived and emloyed as mediator of goalsetting and performance, and its implications for human resource management.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Serge P. da Motta Veiga, Daniel B. Turban, Allison S. Gabriel and Nitya Chawla

Searching for a job is an important process that influences short- and long-term career outcomes as well as well-being and psychological health. As such, job search…

Abstract

Searching for a job is an important process that influences short- and long-term career outcomes as well as well-being and psychological health. As such, job search research has grown tremendously over the last two decades. In this chapter, the authors provide an overview of prior research, discuss important trends in current research, and suggest areas for future research. The authors conceptualize the job search as an unfolding process (i.e., a process through which job seekers navigate through stages to achieve their goal of finding and accepting a job) in which job seekers engage in self-regulation behaviors. The authors contrast research that has taken a between-person, static approach with research that has taken a within-person, dynamic approach and highlight the importance of combining between- and within-person designs in order to have a more holistic understanding of the job search process. Finally, authors provide some recommendations for future research. Much remains to be learned about what influences job search self-regulation, and how job self-regulation influences job search and employment outcomes depending on individual, contextual, and environmental factors.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-322-3

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2019

Sadia Afzal, Muhammad Arshad, Sharjeel Saleem and Omer Farooq

The purpose of this paper is to explain the mediational mechanisms in the relationship of perceived supervisor support (PSS) with turnover intention (TI) and task performance (TP).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the mediational mechanisms in the relationship of perceived supervisor support (PSS) with turnover intention (TI) and task performance (TP).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through questionnaires from the academic staff of Pakistani universities. The theoretical model was tested using data collected from 304 respondents by using structural equation modeling technique. Mediation analysis was performed with 5,000 bootstraps samples.

Findings

The results revealed that PSS affected TI negatively through the mediation of self-efficacy. Conversely to this, PSS influenced TP positively through the mediation of self-efficacy. In addition, the results also showed the direct effect of PSS on employees’ TP.

Practical implications

The results of this study suggest that the supervisor must provide adequate support to the academic staff, which helps them to develop their self-efficacy. Self-efficacy is helpful for the employees to reduce their TI and to improve their TP.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its nature which explained the direct and indirect effects of PSS on TI and TP by using the framework of social learning theory and social exchange theory simultaneously.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2020

Wen-Lung Shiau, Ye Yuan, Xiaodie Pu, Soumya Ray and Charlie C. Chen

The purpose of this study is to clarify theory and identify factors that could explain the level of fintech continuance intentions with an expectation confirmation model…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to clarify theory and identify factors that could explain the level of fintech continuance intentions with an expectation confirmation model that integrates self-efficacy theory.

Design/methodology/approach

With data collected from 753 fintech users, this study applies partial least square structural equation modeling to compare and select the research model with the most predictive power.

Findings

The results show that financial self-efficacy, technological self-efficacy and confirmation positively affect perceived usefulness. Among these factors, financial self-efficacy and technological self-efficacy have both direct and indirect effects through confirmation on perceived usefulness. Perceived usefulness and confirmation are positively related to satisfaction. Finally, perceived usefulness and satisfaction positively influence fintech continuance intentions.

Originality/value

To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the earliest studies that investigates the effect of domain-specific self-efficacy on fintech continuance intentions, which enriches the existing research on fintech and deepens our understanding of users' fintech continuance intentions. We distinguish between financial self-efficacy and technological self-efficacy and specify the relationship between self-efficacy and continuance intentions. Moreover, this study highlights the importance of assessing a model's predictive power using the PLSpredict technique and provides a reference for model selection.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 120 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Ashish Kalra, Raj Agnihotri, Rakesh Singh, Sandeep Puri and Narendra Kumar

Although the role of self-leadership is important, it remains understudied in business-to-business (B2B) selling context. This study aims to provide insights into the…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the role of self-leadership is important, it remains understudied in business-to-business (B2B) selling context. This study aims to provide insights into the drivers and outcomes of behavioral self-leadership tested through a sample working in pharmaceutical sales in an emerging economy. In accord, the authors investigate the relationships between self-efficacy, behavioral self-leadership, adaptive selling and ultimately sales performance. This study also investigates the moderating role of technical knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from 208 salespeople working in pharmaceutical industry. AMOS 21.0 and SmartPLS3.0 were utilized to test the conceptual framework.

Findings

The study finds that self-efficacy is positively related to behavioral self-leadership that in turn is positively related to adaptive selling and sales performance. In addition, counter intuitive findings were uncovered related to salesperson’s technical knowledge. Those with high technical knowledge exhibited weaker relationship between self-efficacy and behavioral self-leadership, behavioral self-leadership and adaptive selling and that between behavioral self-leadership and sales performance than their counterparts with low technical knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends work on self-leadership by exploring the effect of self-efficacy and behavioral self-leadership on sales performance. This study also extends the theory on salesperson’s knowledge by proposing the counter-intuitive effect of knowledge and self-efficacy and knowledge and behavioral self-leadership on adaptive selling and sales performance.

Practical implications

Sales managers should consider that not all employees indulging in behavioral self-leadership would reap benefits from the same. As such, sales managers should assess the level of technical knowledge of the salesforce and when determining their training programs that develop such self-leadership skills.

Originality/value

The study is one of the first to consider the drivers and outcomes of behavioral self-leadership and technical knowledge in a B2B sales context. By focusing on the interplay between knowledge and self-efficacy and knowledge and behavioral self-leadership, this study provides greater understanding of the effects of behavioral self-leadership than previously expected by sales researchers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Depeng Zhang, Fuli Zhang, Si Liu and Helen S. Du

With the rise of customer engagement in online products and services innovation, enterprises are seeking effective referral reward program (RRP) to encourage customers…

Abstract

Purpose

With the rise of customer engagement in online products and services innovation, enterprises are seeking effective referral reward program (RRP) to encourage customers’ follow-up electronic-referral (e-referral) behaviors. Therefore, how to stimulate more customers to participate in the RRP is very important to enterprises. However, little empirical work has systemically investigated the impact of RRP on customers’ follow-up e-referral, as well as the moderating effects of customers’ characteristics. To fill those research gaps, the purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of RRP (particularly, reward amount and reward type) on customers’ follow-up e-referral, and the role of creative self-efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the self-perception theory and the context of online customer innovation, this paper establishes a theoretical model and uses an experiment with 160 participants to test the hypotheses on the role of reward (amount and type) and the moderating effect of creative self-efficacy.

Findings

The results of the experiment suggest that both reward amount and reward type in RRP positively impact customers’ follow-up e-referral. Furthermore, customers’ creative self-efficacy moderates the relationship between rewards and customers’ follow-up e-referral. Customers with low creative self-efficacy, reward amount significantly stimulate their follow-up e-referral, but such effect is insignificant when customers’ creative self-efficacy is high. In terms of reward type, gift reward has more positive effect on customers’ follow-up e-referral when they have high (rather than low) creative self-efficacy, but cash reward has more positive effect on those with low (rather than high) creative self-efficacy.

Originality/value

First, based on the self-perception theory, the study clarifies the inconsistent relationship between reward and customers’ e-referral and contributes to related research. Second, the study broadens the existing research perspective by introducing creative self-efficacy, which shows interesting and powerful moderating effect but has been ignored in previous studies. Third, the study provides valuable advice on how enterprises design an effective RRP to enhance customers’ follow-up e-referral.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2010

Robert M. Klassen and Ellen L. Usher

For half a century, psychologist Albert Bandura has worked to advance a cognitive interactional model of human functioning that emphasizes the role of cognitive and…

Abstract

For half a century, psychologist Albert Bandura has worked to advance a cognitive interactional model of human functioning that emphasizes the role of cognitive and symbolic representations as central processes in human adaptation and change. In his seminal 1977 publication, Bandura emphasized that these representations – visualized actions and outcomes stemming from reflective thought – form the basis from which individuals assess their personal efficacy. An efficacy belief, he contended, is the “conviction that one can successfully execute the behavior required to produce the outcomes” one desires (p. 193). Efficacy beliefs serve as the primary means by which people are able to exercise a measure of control over their lives. During the next two decades, Bandura (1986, 1997) advanced his social cognitive theory, in which people are viewed as self-organizing, proactive, self-reflecting, and self-regulating rather than as solely reactive organisms, products of environmental or concealed inner influences. From this agentic perspective, people are seen as contributors to their life circumstances, not just recipients of them. In this way, people are “partial architects of their own destinies” (Bandura, 1997, p. 8).

Details

The Decade Ahead: Theoretical Perspectives on Motivation and Achievement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-111-5

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2021

Xiaoxiao Shi, Wei Pan, Wei Pan and Wei Shan

Crowdsourcing communities enable companies to post challenges that are completed by solvers (workers); their success depends on engagement, requiring both creativity and…

Abstract

Purpose

Crowdsourcing communities enable companies to post challenges that are completed by solvers (workers); their success depends on engagement, requiring both creativity and effort. This study explores solver engagement in online crowdsourcing communities, advancing the theory of trait engagement by investigating the mediating roles of: (a) task-related self-efficacy in linking conscientiousness, neuroticism and extraversion, with solver engagement, and (b) task complexity in influencing the mediation.

Design/methodology/approach

215 valid responses were obtained from solvers engaged in the popular Chinese crowdsourcing community, Epwk.com, using an online questionnaire. PLS was then used to analyze the data.

Findings

Results show that self-efficacy mediates the relationships for conscientiousness, neuroticism and extraversion, with solver engagement. Moderated mediation analysis revealed that self-efficacy mediates the relationships for: (a) conscientiousness and extraversion, for only solvers with high task complexity; and (b) neuroticism, for only solvers with low task complexity.

Originality/value

The authors’ findings underscore the importance of accounting for solvers' situational contexts when examining the relationships between personality, self-efficacy and solver engagement in online crowdsourcing communities.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Hillman Wirawan and Muhammad Thahir Bandu

The purpose of this paper is to consider the implication of self-efficacy training for international students (SETIS). International students faced various transitional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the implication of self-efficacy training for international students (SETIS). International students faced various transitional challenges which also potentially attenuate their academic performance. Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) is sufficient in explaining this phenomenon as well as suggesting self-efficacy enhancement strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a speculative viewpoint on the implications of SETIS. The author reviewed relevant literature and systematically constructing the SETIS based on the SCT. The SCT was used to design an appropriate training to help international students cope with transitional challenges which significantly attenuate their academic performance.

Findings

The SCT and self-efficacy theory were relevant in designing the training for international students. There are four key elements of the SETIS: goal-setting; effort explanation; modeling; and sharing and evaluation. The implementation of SETIS follows the common rule in conducting effective training including need assessment and post-training evaluation. Information from academic performance record, English as Second Language test score, General Self-efficacy Scale, Students’ Adaptation to College Questionnaire, and Focus Group Discussion is also necessary to justify the need for SETIS.

Research limitations/implications

Despite theoretical evidence of the SETIS, further research is necessary to test the effectiveness of this training. Future study in this specific area should focus on examining the effectiveness of the training.

Originality/value

This paper addressed important issues in international education. A systematic effort in providing robust and theoretical-based training for international students is necessary. By considering the importance of self-efficacy and academic performance, this paper had begun an initial effort in designing training for international students who are struggling for a transitional challenge. Additionally, this paper provides a practical guideline in implementing SETIS.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Yu-Wei Chang, Ping-Yu Hsu, Wen-Lung Shiau and Ronghua Yi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how customer power of environmental factors affects customer support (CS) engineers’ personal motivations in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how customer power of environmental factors affects customer support (CS) engineers’ personal motivations in a knowledge-sharing context. The authors examine extrinsic (i.e. organizational rewards, reputation, and reciprocity) and intrinsic motivations (i.e. knowledge self-efficacy) affecting knowledge-sharing intentions based on the social exchange theory (SET) and self-efficacy theory. Furthermore, the authors introduce the concept of the social power theory to investigate the moderating effect of customer power on the relationships between personal motivations and knowledge-sharing intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collects 349 questionnaires of CS engineers from 16 countries, including the USA, China, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. After the data collection, the research model and hypotheses are tested using partial least squares.

Findings

The empirical results show that reputation, reciprocity, and knowledge self-efficacy are significantly and positively related to knowledge-sharing intentions. Also, the results show that customer power can significantly moderate the relationships between personal motivations and knowledge-sharing intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The findings help multinational corporations employ the perception of customer power to motivate CS engineers to share knowledge. Especially, the results can help organizations increase customer added value through effective knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

The research model integrates personal motivations derived from the SET and self-efficacy theory and customer power of environmental factors. Additionally, this study is the first to investigate the moderating effect of customer power on employees’ personal motivations and behavioral intentions.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 67 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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