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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Kevin McManus

Reviews skills for supervision in the twenty‐first century, toolsfor identifying current knowledge and skills, and a transformationlearning plan. Essential new skills are based on…

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Abstract

Reviews skills for supervision in the twenty‐first century, tools for identifying current knowledge and skills, and a transformation learning plan. Essential new skills are based on the 12 key skills areas (KSAs). Identifies essential components of the KSA gap analysis, a daily task trade‐off plan, a three‐year learning plan and a daily personal vision message. These may need to be modified to fit a particular organization.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Eamonn Butler

Perhaps the most remarkable event in the US medical market in the last ten years has been the astonishing growth of the new kinds of health‐care delivery systems that are…

Abstract

Perhaps the most remarkable event in the US medical market in the last ten years has been the astonishing growth of the new kinds of health‐care delivery systems that are collectively known as health maintenance organisations (HMOs). Indeed, they are now posing a serious threat to the conventional insurance sector which has traditionally covered most Americans. According to data collected by the US Department of Health and Human Services and the Minnesota research foundation, InterStudy, some 18.9 million people were enrolled in an HMO in June 1985, so that the 400 HMOs then in existence accounted for roughly nine per cent of the health‐care market. Today's figures are undoubtedly higher, and one New York investment company expects that ‘by 1990, 75 million people, or 30 per cent of the population, will be members of HMOs’, with the organisations achieving ‘membership expansion and revenue growth of 30–40 per cent a year’

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Article
Publication date: 9 June 2023

Pierre-Luc Fournier, Lionel Bahl, Desirée H. van Dun, Kevin J. Johnson and Jean Cadieux

The complexity and uncertainty of healthcare operations increasingly require agility to safeguard a high quality of care. Using a microfoundations of dynamic capabilities…

Abstract

Purpose

The complexity and uncertainty of healthcare operations increasingly require agility to safeguard a high quality of care. Using a microfoundations of dynamic capabilities perspective, this study investigates the effects of nurses' implicit voice theories (IVTs) on the behaviors that influence their individual agility.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses quantitative survey data collected from 2,552 Canadian nurses during the fourth wave of the Covid-19 pandemic in the fall of 2021. Structural equation modeling is used to test a conceptual model that hypothesizes the effects of three different IVTs on nurses' creativity, spontaneity, agility and the quality of care they deliver to patients.

Findings

The results reveal that voice-inhibiting cognitions (like “suggestions are criticisms for higher-ups”, “I first need a solution or solid data”, and “speaking up has negative repercussions”) negatively impact nurses' creativity and spontaneity in crafting solutions to problems they face daily. In turn, this affects nurses' individual agility as they attempt to adapt to changing circumstances and, ultimately, the quality of care they provide to their patients.

Practical implications

Even if organizations have little control over employees' pre-held beliefs regarding voice, they can still reverse them by developing and nurturing a voice-welcoming culture to boost their workers' agility.

Originality/value

This study combines two theoretical frameworks, voice theory and dynamic capabilities theory, to study how individual-level factors (cognitions and behaviors) contribute to nurses' individual agility and the quality of care they provide to their patients. It answers the recent calls of scholars to study the mechanisms through which healthcare operations can develop and sustain dynamic capabilities, such as agility, and better face the “new normal”.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Edward R. Bruning, Harry J. Turtle and Kevin Buhr

We examine the entry mode choice for Canadian firms entering the United States (U.S.). Entry options are categorized into three competing modes: mergers and acquisitions; joint…

Abstract

We examine the entry mode choice for Canadian firms entering the United States (U.S.). Entry options are categorized into three competing modes: mergers and acquisitions; joint ventures; and subsidiaries. The unit of analysis is the foreign direct investment (FDI) transaction between a Canadian firm and an American counterpart during the period from January 1980 through December 1989. Using canonical discriminant analysis, we develop a set of variables that characterize the entry mode choice. We find transaction specific information available to senior management provides important information regarding the entry mode choice. The importance of mergers and acquisitions is particularly apparent over this sample period. Empirical evidence strongly supports our measures of resource commitment, dissemination risk, and liquidity position as important measures determining mode of entry. Joint ventures display meaningful differences related to these measures in contrast to both mergers and acquisitions, and subsidiary investments.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 7 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Article
Publication date: 20 June 2019

Kevin John Burnard and Ran Bhamra

The purpose of this paper is to outline the complex challenges organisations must address in order to respond and recover from disruptive events, and highlight the important…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the complex challenges organisations must address in order to respond and recover from disruptive events, and highlight the important perspectives within the growing narrative of resilience, from and operations and strategic management perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an approach that involves the critique of relevant and latest literature, this paper looks to identify the challenges in developing resilience at an organisational level.

Findings

The outcome of this paper establishes a set of propositions to guide the development of organisational-level resilience as well as future research. These propositions highlight the features of both active and passive resilience, and identify key considerations for organisations.

Originality/value

These propositions highlight the features of both active and passive resilience, and identify key considerations for organisations. Through recognising these propositions, organisations may be better placed to address the impacts of disruptive events.

Details

Continuity & Resilience Review, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7502

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2023

Steven Barnes, Jerome Carson and Kevin Gournay

Evidence suggests supported living can improve functioning and reduce need. However, its lack of a clear definition has presented significant challenges to establishing a…

Abstract

Purpose

Evidence suggests supported living can improve functioning and reduce need. However, its lack of a clear definition has presented significant challenges to establishing a definitive evaluation of its efficacy. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a defined model of supported living using in terms of reductions made to aspects of clinical and social recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

A naturalistic, non-controlled assessment was conducting using using the Camberwell Assessment of Need Clinical Scale with a sample of adults with severe and enduring mental illness residing with a UK-based mental health company at 1 of 12 UK locations.

Findings

Analysis regarding preliminary outcomes relating to health and social need is presented with comparison between admission and six-months post-admission (N = 90). Additional analysis relating to outcomes at 12 months is also provided (N = 39). Significant outcomes are noted at both timepoints in terms of reducing unmet need and levels of formal and informal help given/required during tenancy.

Practical implications

The findings support that, even in the absence of clinical recovery, opportunities exist to make meaningful and valuable improvements to unmet need and functional independence, with implications for clinical practice in the context of supported living.

Originality/value

The findings provide encouraging early indications of the benefits of the model in making meaningful reductions to functional and psychological needs in individuals with severe and enduring mental illness.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2017

Terrill L. Frantz

The PMI Risk Framework (PRF) is introduced as a guide to classifying and identifying risks which can be the source of post-merger integration (PMI) failure — commonly referred to…

Abstract

The PMI Risk Framework (PRF) is introduced as a guide to classifying and identifying risks which can be the source of post-merger integration (PMI) failure — commonly referred to as “culture clash.” To provide managers with actionably insight, PRF dissects PMI risk into specific relationship-oriented phenomena, critical to outcomes and which should be addressed during PMI. This framework is a conceptual and theory-grounded integration of numerous perspectives, such as organizational psychology, group dynamics, social networks, transformational change, and nonlinear dynamics. These concepts are unified and can be acted upon by integration managers. Literary resources for further exploration into the underlying aspects of the framework are provided. The PRF places emphasis on critical facets of PMI, particularly those which are relational in nature, pose an exceptionally high degree of risk, and are recurrent sources of PMI failure. The chapter delves into relationship-oriented points of failure that managers face when overseeing PMI by introducing a relationship-based, PMI risk framework. Managers are often not fully cognizant of these risks, thus fail to manage them judiciously. These risks do not naturally abide by common scholarly classifications and cross disciplinary boundaries; they do not go unrecognized by scholars, but until the introduction of PRF the risks have not been assimilated into a unifying framework. This chapter presents a model of PMI risk by differentiating and specifying numerous types of underlying human-relationship-oriented risks, rather than considering PMI cultural conflict as a monolithic construct.

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Daniel O'Neill, Louis Gunnigan and Peter Clarke

The purpose of this paper is to present information on the construction technology used to build Dublin City Council’s (DCC’s) housing stock, with an emphasis on wall…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present information on the construction technology used to build Dublin City Council’s (DCC’s) housing stock, with an emphasis on wall construction.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology applied was a mix of literature review and archival research. The research was undertaken as part of PhD research exploring the energy upgrade of a housing stock.

Findings

The research uncovered details of the construction technology used in the construction of DCC’s housing stock, especially wall construction. These details disprove perceptions and assumptions made on the evolution of construction technology in Dublin and Ireland.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited in that it primarily focused on the period between 1887 to the introduction of the 1991 Building Regulations. Further research is required on both DCC’s housing stock and the Irish housing stock to identify the specific changes in construction technology.

Practical implications

It is hoped this research will be a foundation for further research on the evolution of house construction technology, and housing stock asset intelligence in Ireland.

Originality/value

This research provides information for researchers and professionals with an interest in the evolution of Irish house construction technology. This is an area which has not received significant attention in Irish built-environment research.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2019

Kevin You

This paper aims to investigate the way in which Sri Lankan business associations contribute to addressing such issues and the motivation behind their contributions.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the way in which Sri Lankan business associations contribute to addressing such issues and the motivation behind their contributions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data, in this study, came from publicly available sources (online news articles, newspaper articles, reports, etc.) and a series of unstructured elite interviews with leaders of Sri Lanka’s most prominent peak business associations.

Findings

Sri Lankan associations contribute to addressing problems associated with human capital flight because doing so, ultimately, benefits their members and secretariat organisations. Peak bodies make their contributions by easing the push factors that catalyse the outflow of skilled migrants from the island nation and helping to replenish skills in the country by engaging in initiatives aimed at training and developing workers, young people and entrepreneurs.

Research limitations/implications

The behaviours of Sri Lanka’s business interest associations and the logics that drive their actions are similar to those of their counterparts in other countries (as per academic literature in the area), where association membership is not state-mandated. Rational actions of business associations have the potential to produce socially beneficial positive externalities (as in the present case issues around the brain drain).

Social implications

Findings from this research can assist government bodies, non-government organisations and other civil society organisations develop a better collaborative relationship with the private sector in developing nations to tackle problems associated with human capital flight.

Originality/value

While there has been a lively debate, among philosophers and scholars of public policy, on how governments should help address issues associated with this phenomenon, very little attention has been given to the real and potential contributions of non-governmental, non-charity-based civil society groups such as unions and business chambers. This paper seeks to address this gap.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Joanne Procter and Martyn Richards

Defines the pester power phenomenon as the repeated delivery of unwanted requests, arguing however that this is not the main driving influence in purchasing behaviour. Shows…

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Abstract

Defines the pester power phenomenon as the repeated delivery of unwanted requests, arguing however that this is not the main driving influence in purchasing behaviour. Shows instead that a large number of highly successful products, notably Harry Potter, became popular not through marketing but via word‐of‐mouth, and the staying power (or stickiness) of a product like Pokemon illustrates the importance of social learning. Recounts the experiment of Stanley Milgram’s chain letter, and the Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon game, which shows the amount of connectedness in society. Relates this to diffusion research is central to word‐of‐mouth marketing, and also mentions viral marketing and coolhunting, both of which involve word‐of‐mouth.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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