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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Nina Hughes

Describes how and where we perceive the sense of taste, thetraditional four basic taste sensations, and why different parts of themouth are more or less sensitive to a…

Abstract

Describes how and where we perceive the sense of taste, the traditional four basic taste sensations, and why different parts of the mouth are more or less sensitive to a particular one. Outlines types of compounds having a particular taste with some relationships between and anomalies of their chemical structure and the taste sensation they elicit, together with individual variation in tasting sensitivity and factors affecting this, such as adaptation. Summarizes interesting taste phenomena including: taste blindness; taste modification; the role of heavy metals in taste perception. Describes the additional taste sensations that have been proposed such as: umami; water‐taste; metallic; alkalinity and other gustatory effects such as pungency (burning sensation), cooling and astringency.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 92 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Robert Eyler

American wineries have taken marketing steps toward attracting consumers. They employ tasting scores to augment and solidify market share. According to Oster (1999) and…

Abstract

American wineries have taken marketing steps toward attracting consumers. They employ tasting scores to augment and solidify market share. According to Oster (1999) and Porter (1985), competitive advantage comes from either cost advantages or product differentiation. American wineries use tasting scores they receive from experts as the basis for product differentiation and raising prices. To achieve competitive advantage, the product must be seen as important and an improvement in the market, while simultaneously lacking imitation. This article looks at how tasting scores given by wine experts may affect American firms' competitive advantage, barring entry by importing rivals, such as Australian firms. If these tasting scores provide product importance and improvements, while delivering a product that lacks imitation, competitive advantage may result. If importers to the US realise this, these firms can undermine American advantages, increase competition, and gain market share through their own competitive advantages.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Louise M. McCorkindale

Taste is defined in a variety of ways, and arises fromphysiological processes which are influenced by social factors.Explanations of taste therefore require information…

Abstract

Taste is defined in a variety of ways, and arises from physiological processes which are influenced by social factors. Explanations of taste therefore require information from biological, sociological and cultural perspectives. Discusses the contribution made to our understanding of taste by the biological and social sciences, with reference to recent sociological and social anthropological research and writing. It argues that food is a particularly powerful medium for the realization of social relationships and the creation of individual identity. The social context therefore has an indirect but causal relationship with individual tastes. The cultural context is also crucial, as the socially constructed meaning of a food can influence taste perception itself. Explanations of taste therefore require an understanding of the social and cultural contexts of food‐related behaviour.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 92 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1971

H.B. Heath

It was established way back in the middle of the last century that the sensory organs responsible for our appreciation of taste, as distinct from that of flavour, are…

Abstract

It was established way back in the middle of the last century that the sensory organs responsible for our appreciation of taste, as distinct from that of flavour, are located on the tongue. Since then considerable research has been carried out into the structure and mechanisms involved. It has long been recognised that the prime organs of taste are the taste buds. This name was originally applied to special cells which had been observed in the mouths of fishes. Early research soon established that certain raised portions, distributed over the surface of the tongue, the papillae as they became called, are the site of the receptor organs and that those areas of the tongue which do not bear the papillae are insensitive to the taste stimulus.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 71 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Trent James Davis and Miguel I. Gomez

The purpose of this paper is to identify the drivers of customer satisfaction (CS) and sales performance at wineries in the Finger Lakes region of New York State in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the drivers of customer satisfaction (CS) and sales performance at wineries in the Finger Lakes region of New York State in the context of changes winery tasting rooms implemented due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to tasting room visitors at two wineries in October 2020 in the Finger Lakes region of New York State resulting in 215 usable survey responses measuring customer satisfaction. A factor analysis was used to identify primary factors influencing overall CS. The authors then modeled how these primary factors, along with various demographic factors, influence sales metrics. The results are then compared with previous estimates of such drivers in pre-COVID tasting rooms.

Findings

The authors identified four main CS factors: Staff Interactions, Wine Tasting, COVID-19 Precautions and Ambience that play a significant role in overall CS. Of these, Wine Tasting was shown to have a positive influence on total amount spent and the number of bottles purchased, whereas COVID-19 Precautions positively impacted the number of bottles purchased. Overall, CS is also shown to positively impact total amount spent and number of bottles purchased. Customers are shown to prefer some changes to the tasting room due to COVID-19, such as having table service and reservations.

Originality/value

This is the first study researching the influence of certain tasting room changes implemented due to the COVID-19 pandemic has had on CS and wine-purchasing decisions in tasting rooms.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Abstract

Details

Panel Data Econometrics Theoretical Contributions and Empirical Applications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-836-0

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2015

Ronan Torres Quintão and Eliane P. Zamith Brito

Consumption ritual has been used to understand the meanings of consumption and consumer behavior, however less attention has been focused on the role of ritual in…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumption ritual has been used to understand the meanings of consumption and consumer behavior, however less attention has been focused on the role of ritual in connoisseurship consumption and how consumption rituals can transform the consumer’s tastes. What is the role played by consumption ritual in connoisseurship taste?

Methodology/approach

Drawing on key concepts from ritual and taste theories and a qualitative analysis of the North American specialty coffee context, the authors address this question introducing the idea of connoisseurship taste ritual which is based on novelty coffee consumption practices that are opposite of the traditional or regular practices. The data collection set in the United States and Canada includes 15 consumer in-depth interviews, participant observation in 36 independent coffee shops in Canada and the United States, a Specialty Coffee Association of America event, and three barista coffee competitions. The body of qualitative data was interpreted using a hermeneutic approach.

Findings

The authors introduce the connoisseurship taste ritual which has several dimensions: (1) variation in the choices of high-quality products, (2) the place to perform the tasting, (3) the moment of tasting, (4) the tasting act, (5) perseverance, and (6) time and money investment.

Originality/value

This research paper extends the notion of consumption ritual introducing the connoisseurship taste ritual and also extends the theories of taste by explaining how, regarding a specific aesthetic category of product, people develop different tastes through ritualistic consumption.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-323-5

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Jennifer Smith Maguire

Purpose: This paper adopts a practice-oriented approach to address gaps in existing knowledge of the significance of cultural producers’ and intermediaries’ practices of…

Abstract

Purpose: This paper adopts a practice-oriented approach to address gaps in existing knowledge of the significance of cultural producers’ and intermediaries’ practices of taste for the construction and organization of markets. Using the example of the cultural field of “natural” wine, I propose how taste operates as a logic of practice, generating market actions in relation to the aesthetic regime of provenance.

Methodology/approach: The paper sets out the conceptual relationship between aesthetic regimes and practices of taste. The discussion draws from interpretive research on natural wine producers and cultural intermediaries involving 40 interviews with natural wine makers, retailers, sommeliers, and writers based in New York, Western Australia, the Champagne region, and the Cape Winelands.

Findings: Three dimensions of how taste is translated into action are examined: as a device of division, which establishes a fuzzy logic of resemblance; as a device of operation, which provides an intuitive platform for shaping the means of production; and as a device of coordination, which enables an embedded experience of trust.

Originality/value: The paper’s discussion of dispositions, affect, intuition, and pattern identification provide new insights into the translation of taste into action, and the macro-organization of markets. I argue for attention to how cultural producers and cultural intermediaries are mobilized through their habitual sense of taste, shifting the focus away from consumers to those whose market actions are largely self- and peer-referential. This is important for understanding processes of market development and value construction.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-907-8

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2016

John Levi Martin

To determine where, when, how, and wherefore European social theory hit upon the formula of “the True, the Good, and the Beautiful,” and how its structural position as a…

Abstract

Purpose

To determine where, when, how, and wherefore European social theory hit upon the formula of “the True, the Good, and the Beautiful,” and how its structural position as a skeleton for the theory of action has changed.

Methodology/approach

Genealogy, library research, and unusually good fortune were used to trace back the origin of what was to become a ubiquitous phrase, and to reconstruct the debates that made deploying the term seem important to writers.

Findings

The triad, although sometimes used accidentally in the renaissance, assumed a key structural place with a rise of Neo-Platonism in the eighteenth century associated with a new interest in providing a serious analysis of taste. It was a focus on taste that allowed the Beautiful to assume a position that was structurally homologous to those of the True and the Good, long understood as potential parallels. Although the first efforts were ones that attempted to emphasize the unification of the human spirit, the triad, once formulated, was attractive to faculties theorists more interested in decomposing the soul. They seized upon the triad as corresponding to an emerging sense of a tripartition of the soul. Finally, the members of the triad became re-understood as values, now as orthogonal dimensions.

Originality/value

This seems to be the first time the story of the development of the triad – one of the most ubiquitous architectonics in social thought – has been told.

Details

Reconstructing Social Theory, History and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-469-3

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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Magnar Forbord

In every industry there are resources. Some are moving, others more fixed; some are technical, others social. People working with the resources, for example, as buyers or…

Abstract

In every industry there are resources. Some are moving, others more fixed; some are technical, others social. People working with the resources, for example, as buyers or sellers, or users or producers, may not make much notice of them. A product sells. A facility functions. The business relationship in which we make our money has “always” been there. However, some times this picture of order is disturbed. A user having purchased a product for decades may “suddenly” say to the producer that s/he does not appreciate the product. And a producer having received an order of a product that s/he thought was well known, may find it impossible to sell it. Such disturbances may be ignored. Or they can be used as a platform for development. In this study we investigate the latter option, theoretically and through real world data. Concerning theory we draw on the industrial network approach. We see industrial actors as part of (industrial) networks. In their activities actors use and produce resources. Moreover, the actors interact − bilaterally and multilaterally. This leads to development of resources and networks. Through “thick” descriptions of two cases we illustrate and try to understand the interactive character of resource development and how actors do business on features of resources. The cases are about a certain type of resource, a product − goat milk. The main message to industrial actors is that they should pay attention to that products can be co-created. Successful co-creation of products, moreover, may require development also of business relationships and their connections (“networking”).

Details

Managing Product Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-311-2

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