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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

Rao Zheng, Kui‐Sheng Wang and Yun Wang

Emergence is the kernel concept of complexity science. Lack of precision when people refer to “emergent properties” hinders the research of complex systems. The purpose of…

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Abstract

Purpose

Emergence is the kernel concept of complexity science. Lack of precision when people refer to “emergent properties” hinders the research of complex systems. The purpose of this paper is to develop a formal definition of emergence to make it intrinsic to a system and to integrate different views on emergence.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the modeling framework of entity grammar systems (EGS), a formal definition of emergence is proposed and a theorem is obtained for exploring the producing conditions of emergence. With the definition and theorem, three views on emergence are unified using the same formalism of EGS.

Findings

The concept of emergence can be formally defined in the framework of EGS to integrate the “downward causation” and “upward causation” views of emergence and makes emergent properties intrinsic to a system. It is possible to control the production of emergence when the system is analyzed using the formalism of EGS.

Originality/value

A formal definition of emergence is proposed in this paper. This work combines the modeling power of EGS with the formal analysis of emergence, which will prompt the further application of EGS in modeling, simulation, and analysis of complex systems in many fields and will provide practical tools for complexity research.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 38 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2021

Falk Heinrich and Lone Kørnøv

This study aims to contribute to the exploration of inter-disciplinary approaches in higher education for sustainability. It is a reflection on a case study linking…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to contribute to the exploration of inter-disciplinary approaches in higher education for sustainability. It is a reflection on a case study linking students in the arts and sustainability science, through which the inter-disciplinary and problem-solving processes for solving a concrete sustainability challenge were explored.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study featured a workshop with students from two educational programmes at Aalborg University, namely, Art and Technology and Environmental Management and Sustainability Science, the latter being an engineering programme and the former part of the humanities. Experience evaluation was based on participant observation, written feedback and the workshop facilitators’ post-event reflections. Data analysis was based on multi-grounded theory, dialectically combining empirical data (through open coding) with relevant emergence theories. Notions of emergence were chosen because the supposed benefit of inter-disciplinarity is the emergence of novel solutions to complex problems. The study investigates the concrete conditions of emergence in educational inter-disciplinary settings.

Findings

The workshop led to a successful experience, bringing an art-based approach together with sustainability science for arriving at solutions that neither of the two would have arrived at separately. Based on participant experiences and realisations, five “emergence concepts” are suggested as supportive learning criteria and conditions, namely, “knowledge expansion”, “complementarity”, “disciplinary self-reflection”, “change of practice” and “play”.

Originality/value

The findings and emergence concepts can be an inspiration for creating an effective learning environment supporting the emergence of different forms of knowledge and solution concepts for solving sustainability challenges.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2009

Michael D. Mumford, Samuel T. Hunter, Tamara L. Friedrich and Jay J. Caughron

Theories of outstanding, historically notable, leadership have traditionally emphasized charisma. Recent research, however, suggests that charisma may represent only one…

Abstract

Theories of outstanding, historically notable, leadership have traditionally emphasized charisma. Recent research, however, suggests that charisma may represent only one pathway to outstanding leadership. Outstanding leadership may also emerge from ideological and pragmatic leadership. In this article, we examine the conditions influencing the emergence and performance of charismatic, ideological, and pragmatic leaders. It is argued that different conditions operating at the environmental, organizational, group, and individual levels influence the emergence and performance of each of these three types of leaders. Implications for understanding the origins and impact of charismatic, ideological, and pragmatic leaders are discussed.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Organizational Behavior and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-503-7

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Book part
Publication date: 24 March 2017

Suhaib Riaz and Israr Qureshi

We draw on an in-depth investigation into the phenomenon of community radio in India to identify the emergence of an institutional logic in a field. We delineate five…

Abstract

We draw on an in-depth investigation into the phenomenon of community radio in India to identify the emergence of an institutional logic in a field. We delineate five stages of emergence, starting with problematization of dominant logics and ending with formation of an institutionally complex field. Further, we highlight how such a process results in organizational forms that reflect ongoing struggles among dominant logics and the emerging logic. We contribute to neoinstitutional studies on the emergence of social objects and also draw the attention of emergence theorists to the contested manner in which emergence takes place in the social world.

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Book part
Publication date: 24 March 2017

Marc-David L. Seidel and Henrich R. Greve

In social theory, emergence is the process of novelty (1) creation, (2) growth, and (3) formation into a recognizable social object, process, or structure. Emergence is…

Abstract

In social theory, emergence is the process of novelty (1) creation, (2) growth, and (3) formation into a recognizable social object, process, or structure. Emergence is recognized as important for the existence of novel features of society such as new organizations, new practices, or new relations between actors. In this introduction to the volume on emergence, we introduce a framework for examining emergence processes and theories that have been applied or can be applied to each of the three stages. We also review each volume chapter and discuss their relation to each other. Finally, we make suggestions on the future of research on social emergence processes.

Details

Emergence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-915-5

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2018

Ya-long Wei, Dan Long, Yao-kuang Li and Xu-sheng Cheng

The purpose of this paper is to build a research model to examine the effects of business planning on the new venture emergence, as well as to examine the moderating…

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1368

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build a research model to examine the effects of business planning on the new venture emergence, as well as to examine the moderating effects of innovativeness of products.

Design/methodology/approach

Four hypotheses are put forward and examined by hierarchical binary logistic regression. The data of this paper are based on the first two waves of data from Chinese Panel Study of Entrepreneurial Dynamics project.

Findings

Results show that engaging in business planning has a positive effect on the new venture emergence, and the timing of business planning does not affect the new venture emergence significantly. This study also finds that the innovativeness of products has a positive moderating effect on the relationship between the timing of business planning and the new venture emergence.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations. The innovativeness of products is measured by a single indicator, which may not completely reflect the meaning of the attribute. Moreover, this study explores new ventures only in the nascent stage.

Practical implications

The study is useful for entrepreneurs to realize the importance of business planning. First, engaging in business planning in early start-up stage is a very valuable activity, because business planning can help new ventures reduce the loss caused by trial and error learning. Second, engaging in business planning is more likely to ensure high innovative products quickly be accepted by the market. Because in the process of new venture emergence, the legitimacy signal to stakeholders can be transmitted and new products can be promoted to get support and recognition from stakeholder through the business plan.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on the early stage of new venture life cycle and the contextual factors to explore the influence of business planning on the new venture emergence under the logic of legitimacy. This paper could enrich business planning research from the perspective of legitimacy theory by inspiring scholars to focus on the differences between new ventures and mature enterprises and to offer proposals of legitimation strategies suitable for new ventures. Meanwhile, this study contributes to the understanding of the contextual factors of business planning. And it discusses the impact of the attribute in business planning on the new venture emergence, which helps scholars to get a deep thought about the value of business planning in entrepreneurial process.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Dan Long and Nan Dong

The purpose of this paper is to identify the model that explains the new venture emergence in China by examining the effects of experience and innovativeness of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the model that explains the new venture emergence in China by examining the effects of experience and innovativeness of entrepreneurial opportunities on the new venture emergence, as well as the moderating effect of munificence.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the dynamic data from the Chinese Panel Study of Entrepreneurial Dynamics (CPSED) where nascent entrepreneurs were randomly sampled and were followed for three years, this paper uses the COX proportional hazard model to answer the research questions.

Findings

Those who have successful entrepreneurial experience are able to more rapidly create new ventures, whereas the relevant industry experience and innovativeness of entrepreneurial opportunities have a negative effect on the new venture emergence. Moreover, munificence negatively moderates the effects of entrepreneurial experience and innovativeness of entrepreneurial opportunities on the new venture emergence.

Research limitations/implications

This paper only measures whether entrepreneurs have relevant industry experience, and does not reflect on the different degrees of it. In addition, small time interval of dynamic follow-up survey may bias the results.

Practical implications

This paper revealed that not all kinds of experience promote the venture emergence, and a more innovative entrepreneurial opportunity is not always better. Entrepreneurs should accumulate experience and evaluate innovativeness of entrepreneurial opportunities rationally.

Originality/value

New venture emergence relies on the mutual influence of entrepreneurs, entrepreneurial opportunities and entrepreneurial environment. However, most studies explored the new venture emergence from a single perspective which led to a plethora of conflicting conclusions. This paper attempts to examine the effects of experience and innovativeness of entrepreneurial opportunities on the venture emergence, as well as the moderate effect of munificence.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2015

Enrique Nunez

Using the Panel Study of Entrepreneurial Dynamics II dataset, we examine the role that household income plays in the emergence of consumer-oriented start-ups by individual…

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1208

Abstract

Using the Panel Study of Entrepreneurial Dynamics II dataset, we examine the role that household income plays in the emergence of consumer-oriented start-ups by individual (solo), family-based (family), and non-family based start-ups (team). In particular, we address the research question: Does household income impact firm emergence, and if so, is emergence impacted differently based on start-up configuration? Our results indicate that household income does have a significant impact on average firm emergence, as well as on emergence growth rates for solo and family firms, playing an especially significant role for family firms. Furthermore, we found that household income is not a significant predictor of start-up activity completion for teams. Results from our study reinforce the extant literature on the benefits of starting a firm with teams, and suggests that these enterprise types may provide a more stable platform on which to launch a start-up. Implications of these findings and opportunities for future research are offered.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Allan Discua Cruz and Ingrid Fromm

The purpose of this paper is to examine the emergence of a social enterprise by highly skilled members of a diaspora. While most literature has focused on government…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the emergence of a social enterprise by highly skilled members of a diaspora. While most literature has focused on government intervention for diaspora engagement and monetary remittance flows from migrants, less attention has been paid to the transfer of social remittances and social enterprises created by diasporas. Based on the concept of social remittances, social network theory and motivation perspectives, this study unpacks the emergence of a social enterprise by highly skilled migrants of a developing country.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines social enterprise emergence through an autoethnographic approach to describe and systematically analyze personal experience. This approach allows to understand cultural experience around the emergence of a social enterprise created by diverse members of a diaspora.

Findings

Findings reveal that diaspora knowledge networks (DKNs) can emerge through the activation of a highly skilled diaspora network structure. Core diaspora members can activate a latent network of highly skilled migrants that wish to fulfill intrinsic motivations. Findings support the extend current understandings of social remittances by highly skilled migrants, who emerge as a transnational community that desires to stay connected to their country-of-origin and can support the emergence of a transnational network structure for development. The findings reveal that place attachment, sense of duty and well-being are key factors for highly skilled migrants to engage in DKNs.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to literature on networks and migrant-based organizational emergence by examining how and why highly skilled migrants from a developing country engage in the emergence of a DKN. Findings challenge previous views of government intervention and provides evidence on how the transmission of collective social remittances can flow trans-nationally, making highly skilled migrants effective agents of knowledge circulation and DKNs a vehicle for transmission. More specifically, the study provides evidence of the relevance of transnational features in the context of diaspora networks that lead to organizational emergence. It underscores the influence of interrelated motivations in diaspora engagement studies.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

David Lingelbach

How does venture capital (VC) emerge in emerging and developing economies? This paper aims to use case data from an early Russian VC fund to extend a previous model…

Abstract

Purpose

How does venture capital (VC) emerge in emerging and developing economies? This paper aims to use case data from an early Russian VC fund to extend a previous model exploring that question.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies of VC emergence from South Africa, Botswana, and Russia are compared, from which a conceptual model is developed.

Findings

VC emerges in a process consisting of four stages: enabling, coproducing, diffusing, and replicating. The Russian case shows that these stages are linked in a circular process, i.e. replicating can lead to enabling. VC emergence can also begin at any stage. A higher degree of public‐private coproduction may outweigh the absence of a completed enabling stage, suggesting that strength in one stage can compensate for weakness in others.

Research limitations/implications

This paper invites scholars to reconsider VC emergence in a more nuanced manner that takes into account its complex, processual nature. The inclusion of Russian data also encourages researchers to examine more closely the subtle ways in which the private and public sectors may interact in emerging markets in pursuit of common goals. This study's findings have important linkages with other critical accounts of international business. The study addresses weaknesses in earlier literature by employing a multi‐disciplinary, cross‐context approach that utilizes data from a foreign VC investing in Russian small to medium‐sized enterprises.

Practical implications

VCs considering investment in Russia should examine how early entrants to the industry formed cooperative relationships with local governments. Policymakers should re‐examine the relative importance of national and local efforts to promote VC and other innovation‐related initiatives in emerging markets.

Originality/value

This study moves beyond current economics‐dominated understanding of VC, which focuses on antecedents (enabling conditions). It reports the central role of public‐private coproduction in VC emergence, the feedback between diffusion and coproduction in emergence, and, most importantly, the diminished importance of enabling conditions. This paper presents the first fund‐level study of Russian VC.

Details

Critical perspectives on international business, vol. 9 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

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