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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

James Kwame Mensah and Justice Nyigmah Bawole

Previous studies suggested that talent management (TM) is positively related to employee work attitudes. However, a few studies have examined the mechanisms through which…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies suggested that talent management (TM) is positively related to employee work attitudes. However, a few studies have examined the mechanisms through which TM leads to employee work attitudes. The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of person-organisation (P-O) fit on the relationship between TM and employee’s job satisfaction, and organisational citizenship behaviours (OCBs).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 232 talented employees from the Ghanaian banking sector, a partial mediation model was outlined and tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results showed that TM had positive relationship with P-O fit, job satisfaction and OCBs. The findings further show that P-O fit had positive relationship between job satisfaction and OCBs and partially mediated the relationship between TM and both job satisfaction, and OCBs.

Research limitations/implications

This study used cross-sectional data; hence, conclusions regarding causality cannot be made. That is, the results must be interpreted as associations rather than causality.

Practical implications

Management should endeavour to use TM to help align talented employee’s competences, values and goals to those of their organisation.

Originality/value

This study contributed to the TM literature by providing a stronger and more plausible explanation of the relationship between TM and talented employees’ outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2017

Issah Justice Musah-Surugu, Albert Ahenkan, Justice Nyigmah Bawole and Samuel Antwi Darkwah

The much-trumpeted Green Climate Fund and several other official financial mechanisms for financing adaptation to climate change under the UN Framework Convention on…

Abstract

Purpose

The much-trumpeted Green Climate Fund and several other official financial mechanisms for financing adaptation to climate change under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change have fallen short in meeting adaptation needs. Many poorer people are still grappling with the scourge of climate change impacts. Consequently, there has been a dominant research focus on climate change financing emanating from official development assistance (ODA), Adaptation Fund, public expenditure and private sector support. However, there has been little attempt to examine how migrants’ remittances can close adaptation financing gaps at the local level, ostensibly creating a large research gap. This paper aims to argue that migrants’ remittances provide a unique complementary opportunity for financing adaptation and have a wider impact on those who are extremely vulnerable to climate change.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is aligned to the qualitative research approach. Both secondary and primary data acquired through interviews and focus group discussions were used for the study. Multiple sampling methods were also used to select the respondents.

Findings

The findings show that remittances are used to finance both incremental costs of households’ infrastructure and consumption needs, as well as additional investment needs to be occasioned by ongoing or expected changes in climate.

Originality/value

In the wake of dwindling government/public revenue, ODA and poor commitment of Annex II countries to fulfil their financial obligations, the study makes the following recommendations: First, the financial infrastructure underpinning money transfers in both sending and recipient countries should be improved to make transfers attractive. Second, significant steps should be taken to reduce the fees on remittance services, especially for the small transfers typically made by poor migrants. Finally, adequate climatic information should be made available to local people to ensure that remittances are applied to the right adaptation option to avoid maladaptation.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Albert Ahenkan, Emmanuel Senior Tenakwah and Justice Nyigmah Bawole

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the current performance management system of the Sefwi Wiawso Municipal Assembly as well as the challenges faced by the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the current performance management system of the Sefwi Wiawso Municipal Assembly as well as the challenges faced by the Assembly in implementing its performance management system.

Design/methodology/approach

The specific design that was adopted is the case study approach. The primary data were gathered through in-depth interviews. In total, 20 heads of departments and employees were purposively sampled. The data gathered from the interviews were analysed using Miles and Huberman’s (1994) approach to qualitative data analysis.

Findings

The paper reveals that the performance management system of the Assembly has not been effective. The study also reveals poor communication, poor integration, low commitment by the top officials, absence of training, inadequate capacity for setting clear targets and objectives, and measuring and evaluation criteria for performance assessment, cultural issues, absence of rewards for good performance, financial constraints, weak and highly bureaucratic management systems as challenges facing performance management system of the assembly.

Practical implications

This study indicates that the training of supervisors and the linking of performance management systems with reward and recognition are key to ensuring an effective implementation of the performance management system of the Assembly.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to literature by examining the performance management system of the Sefwi Wiawso Municipal Assembly in the Western Region of Ghana by describing and drawing lessons from local government experiences in the implementation of performance management systems in developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Richard Bannor, Anthony Kwame Asare and Justice Nyigmah Bawole

The purpose of this paper is to develop an in-depth understanding of the effectiveness, evolution and dynamism of the current health communication media used in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an in-depth understanding of the effectiveness, evolution and dynamism of the current health communication media used in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a multi-method approach which utilizes a combination of qualitative and quantitative approaches. In-depth interviews are conducted with health promotion professionals in Ghana and 150 members of the general public were surveyed.

Findings

The paper finds that the general public sees social media as an effective place for health professionals to share health-related messages. They also view health-related messages on social media seriously. Health professionals see social media as an effective tool for sending health-related messages to the public and are concerned about the fact that traditional media are losing their effectiveness as means to share health-related messages.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in Ghana. Future studies should be conducted across multiple countries to examine the conclusions developed in this paper and the possibility of multiple perspectives regarding the use of social media for sending health messages.

Practical implications

The results inform public health officials on developments in health communication and suggest prescriptions on how to adjust to the new media.

Originality/value

Health messaging is an area that has been relatively ignored in the literature and almost no research focusses on the effectiveness of social media and other health messaging technologies, particularly in developing countries. Although the study was conducted in Ghana, health professionals worldwide can use the findings to help improve their health messaging strategies.

Details

Health Education, vol. 117 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

James Kwame Mensah, Justice Nyigmah Bawole and Nisada Wedchayanon

Combining insights from the social exchange and signalling theories, the purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate the relationship between talent management…

Abstract

Purpose

Combining insights from the social exchange and signalling theories, the purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate the relationship between talent management (TM) practices and four dimensions of talented employees’ performance; and, second, to examine the mediating role of job satisfaction and affective commitment on this relationship in the Ghanaian banking context.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modelling was used to survey data from 232 employees who are part of a talent pool in the Ghanaian banking sector.

Findings

The findings of this paper showed that TM practices increase positive talented employee performance of task, contextual and adaptive, whereas it reduces counterproductive behaviours. Second, talented employee work attitudes of job satisfaction and affective commitment partially mediate the relationship between TM practices and four dimensions of talented employees’ performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study used cross-sectional data; hence, conclusions regarding causality cannot be made.

Practical implications

Management and organisations implementing and intending to implement TM practices should implement and invest in TM practices that will trigger employee work attitudes to achieve full employee performance.

Originality/value

This paper advances the literature by exploring the relationship between TM practices and four dimensions of talented employees’ performance.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Mohammed Ibrahim, Justice Nyigmah Bawole, Theresa Obuobisa-Darko, Abdul-Bassit Abubakar and Anthony Sumnaya Kumasey

The extant literature posits several claims about the equitable resources allocation through compliance in public procurement management. Notwithstanding, there are hardly…

Abstract

Purpose

The extant literature posits several claims about the equitable resources allocation through compliance in public procurement management. Notwithstanding, there are hardly any empirical studies that explore the link between the causes and extent of compliance on one hand and value for money (VfM) on the other hand. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the efficacy of public procurement laws in ensuring VfM in a developing country context.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a qualitative case study approach involving three local government agencies in Ghana. Purposive and stratified random sampling strategies were used in selecting respondents who were interviewed through focused group discussions, semi-structured and open-ended questionnaires. The study utilizes an interpretivist/constructivist paradigm which allows for the co-creation of knowledge and subjectivity in knowledge acquisition.

Findings

The study finds that the presence of a legal and regulatory framework does not ipso facto guarantee compliance and VfM. Additionally, a possible reason why even reported cases of compliance do not translate into VfM is that evidence of compliance, especially in a developing country setting, is often a façade.

Practical implications

Public procurement entities in developing countries stand little chance of achieving accountability and VfM gains if they continue to rely on compliance as a micro-management tool.

Originality/value

The paper challenges the dominant assumptions in the public procurement management discourse by drawing attention to the quality of reported compliance and its implication for VfM.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Kwame Ameyaw Domfeh and Justice Nyigmah Bawole

The aim of this paper is to examine poverty and poverty reduction at the local level using the Hohoe Municipality and Sefwi‐Wiaso District, both in Ghana, as a case.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine poverty and poverty reduction at the local level using the Hohoe Municipality and Sefwi‐Wiaso District, both in Ghana, as a case.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a survey method, collecting data from 180 farmers on the various aspects of the topic to form the basis of the study. Questionnaires and focus group discussions were used as the data collection instruments.

Findings

The study found that, although many poverty reduction initiatives have been undertaken in Ghana, their impact on the poor farming communities has been very minimal. The failure of these poverty reduction policies could be attributed to the non‐involvement of local people in the process of policy formation. It also revealed that the number of poor people and the degree of poverty might be higher than the details captured by official statistics and publications.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is biased towards farmers. It did not consider other sectors of the Ghanaian population.

Practical implications

Poverty reduction programmes to be developed and implemented in the future must be designed using bottom‐up approaches and must factor the rural farmer into the equation since the agriculture sector is still the largest employer in Ghana.

Originality/value

The paper discusses poverty and how it can be reduced, relying on what the victims of poverty consider as the main causes of poverty and how its reduction can be achieved.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Jolien Grandia and Joanne Meehan

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the special issue and outline its major themes and challenges, their relevance and the research opportunities the field presents.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the special issue and outline its major themes and challenges, their relevance and the research opportunities the field presents.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews prior literature and outlines the need to view public procurement as a policy tool to introduce the contributions to this special issue.

Findings

Public procurement has been consistently used to further public policies in a wide range of fields. The collection of articles in this special issue contributes to a broader understanding of the role and potential of public procurement in delivering desired policy outcomes in society. The articles show that public procurement largely has strategic aspirations, and its potential to deliver on wider societal issues is attractive to policy makers. The issues raised in this collection of articles, however, also demonstrate that public procurement often lacks strategic maturity and critical issues, notably around how to demonstrate and evaluate its impact and “success”.

Research limitations/implications

This paper aims to stimulate interdisciplinary research into the role of public procurement as a policy tool and its ability to achieve public value.

Originality/value

This paper discusses theoretical and empirical findings that highlight the importance of public procurement for achieving public value. The special issue examines the interdisciplinary literature on public procurement and shows how it is being used to achieve public value.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Karem Sayed Aboelazm

Country comparative studies especially in Africa on public procurement reforms toward financial control and accountability of public expenditure are limited. Meanwhile…

Abstract

Purpose

Country comparative studies especially in Africa on public procurement reforms toward financial control and accountability of public expenditure are limited. Meanwhile, these kinds of studies have potential for providing useful insights on how value for money through public procurement is being ensured across Africa. This paper attempts to provide this. The purpose of this paper is to highlight several policy recommendations for public management aimed at improving public procurement and public financial management (PFM) systems in Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a qualitative case study using secondary data drawn from Global Integrity Index (GII) of the Transparency International and the World Bank’s Country Policy and Institutional Assessments databases to investigate variables that influence public procurement practices in three purposively selected African countries. The comparative approach for presenting some of the experiences of countries in public procurement methods is used in this paper.

Findings

The findings suggest three main variables, namely, government structure and economic variables, complicated by socio-cultural values interact to influence public procurement and PFM systems in the case study countries.

Research limitations/implications

Data for the GII indicators used were only available from 2013, which restricted the discussion of those indicators to a short span (2013–2015).

Social implications

The socio-cultural milieu within which public procurement takes place has implications for how governance structures function to deliver value-for-money public procurement.

Originality/value

This study adds value by comparing three countries within Africa to reveal common variables which influence public procurement and PFM systems.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Keywords

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