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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

David S. Jones

Despite the economic transformation that the various countries in Southeast Asia have undergone, serious weaknesses have persisted in the area of public procurement. These…

Abstract

Despite the economic transformation that the various countries in Southeast Asia have undergone, serious weaknesses have persisted in the area of public procurement. These include fragmented procurement procedures; the lack of professional procurement expertise; the absence of open, competitive tendering, especially for foreign suppliers; widespread corruption; and the lack of transparency. In recent years, limited progress has been made in reforming public procurement but all too often the reforms have been inadequate and have not had the desired impact so that shortcomings still persist. In light of these failings, the paper will highlight the twin challenges facing most of the states of the region: viz. the need to reinforce the recent procurement reforms and to translate them into actual practices.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Mohammed Ibrahim, Justice Nyigmah Bawole, Theresa Obuobisa-Darko, Abdul-Bassit Abubakar and Anthony Sumnaya Kumasey

The extant literature posits several claims about the equitable resources allocation through compliance in public procurement management. Notwithstanding, there are hardly…

Abstract

Purpose

The extant literature posits several claims about the equitable resources allocation through compliance in public procurement management. Notwithstanding, there are hardly any empirical studies that explore the link between the causes and extent of compliance on one hand and value for money (VfM) on the other hand. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the efficacy of public procurement laws in ensuring VfM in a developing country context.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a qualitative case study approach involving three local government agencies in Ghana. Purposive and stratified random sampling strategies were used in selecting respondents who were interviewed through focused group discussions, semi-structured and open-ended questionnaires. The study utilizes an interpretivist/constructivist paradigm which allows for the co-creation of knowledge and subjectivity in knowledge acquisition.

Findings

The study finds that the presence of a legal and regulatory framework does not ipso facto guarantee compliance and VfM. Additionally, a possible reason why even reported cases of compliance do not translate into VfM is that evidence of compliance, especially in a developing country setting, is often a façade.

Practical implications

Public procurement entities in developing countries stand little chance of achieving accountability and VfM gains if they continue to rely on compliance as a micro-management tool.

Originality/value

The paper challenges the dominant assumptions in the public procurement management discourse by drawing attention to the quality of reported compliance and its implication for VfM.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Christy Smith and Jessica Terman

Scholars and practitioners have come to understand the important role of local governments in the causes and effects of climate change. The literature has examined both…

Abstract

Scholars and practitioners have come to understand the important role of local governments in the causes and effects of climate change. The literature has examined both the substantive and symbolic determinants of urban sustainability policies in addition to the implementation issues associated with those policies. At the heart of these policies is the idea that local governments have the desire and ability to engage in socially and environmentally responsible practices to mitigate climate change. While important, these studies are missing a key component in the investigation of local government involvement in sustainability policies: government purchasing power. This study examines the effect of administrative professionalism and interest group presence on the determinants of green procurement in the understudied context of counties in the United States.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Article
Publication date: 30 April 2020

Conghu Wang, Yuhua Qiao and Xiaoming Li

This paper aims to identify important factors in green public procurement (GPP) implementation and then to clarify how these factors affect GPP implementation.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify important factors in green public procurement (GPP) implementation and then to clarify how these factors affect GPP implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors applied the Delphi method first and then conducted a focused and constrained multiple case study at 18 government procurement centers across China.

Findings

The authors identified four clusters of factors for successful GPP implementation: more clear, consistent and operational policy goals; a nation-wide green procurement campaign to enhance social capital and cultural resources; promoting staff’s ethics, professionalism, capacity and knowledge; and establishing checks and balances among organizations involved in the whole purchasing process.

Social implications

GPP can significantly improve environmental protection and sustainable development.

Originality/value

Based on key insights from systems theory and agency theory, the authors emphasize that GPP implementation must take down its own functional silos and adopt a process approach across organizational tiers to synchronize human resource based and inter-organizational capabilities into a unified whole through information sharing, communications and collaboration.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Jonathan D. Ritschel

For decades, cost growth in major military weapon system programs has been problematic. The result is a multitude of studies documenting internally focused causes of…

Abstract

For decades, cost growth in major military weapon system programs has been problematic. The result is a multitude of studies documenting internally focused causes of Department of Defense (DoD) acquisition cost growth and a spawning of acquisition reforms that have provided little relief to the problem. The missing components of these prior analyses are the larger economic and political factors that contribute to cost growth. This study analyzes cost growth in major DoD development and procurement contracts through a holistic political-economy construct including the effect of the political party of the President and Congress, and the liberal-conservative record of the Armed Services Committees. These political-economy constructs in both development contracts and procurement contracts are found to be more robust.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Yuhua Qiao and Glenn Cummings

Public agencies have started to shift away from the traditional lowest responsive and responsible bid to other approaches in purchasing certain items and services. These…

Abstract

Public agencies have started to shift away from the traditional lowest responsive and responsible bid to other approaches in purchasing certain items and services. These alternative approaches emphasize the quality of the products and the qualifications of the vendors. The purpose of this article is to explore the use qualifications-based selection (QBS) and other non-traditional source selection methods in public procurement processes. An online survey was sent out to 1665 members of the National Institute of Governmental Purchasing, and a mail survey sent a random sample to 300 American Public Works Association members. The survey results show that while the traditional lowest responsive and responsible bidding is still the dominant selection method when all procurement is considered, QBS and other non-traditional methods have gained wide acceptance and use in public agencies, especially for the purchase of professional services and information technology.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Abstract

Details

Fighting Corruption in the Public Sector
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-857-5

Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Nicholas Dorn, Michael Levi and Simone White

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether opportunities for fraud and corruption might be reduced or increased by rules governing public procurement. The focus is on…

2525

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether opportunities for fraud and corruption might be reduced or increased by rules governing public procurement. The focus is on specific European legislation – Procurement Directive 2004/18 on the coordination of procedures for the award of contracts for public works, public supply and public services by public bodies within all EU Member States – however similar issues would arise in other jurisdictions.

Design/methodology/approach

The procurement process is examined in relation to three stages of procedure: preparation of specifications, selection of tenderers, and execution of contracts, within each of which some specific risks (red flags) are identified.

Findings

Particular risks that may not have been sufficiently addressed, in terms of research or legislation, arise at the first of these stages; accordingly this paper focuses there. Generally, risks are summarised in terms of insider‐driven specifications, low visibility of procurement processes, and ample opportunities for renegotiation of terms. Risks may be increased by innovative procurement practices that have the effect of extending the manoeuvring between tenderers and public bodies, such as competitive dialogue.

Research limitations/implications

Fraud and corruption risk in public procurement is an area deserving detailed and comparative study, with special attention to the pre‐contracting stage. Research on this topic within EU Member States should go hand in hand with enquiry into international procurement, and into the EC's own rules as applied by its institutions and bodies.

Practical implications

Suggestions for risk‐reduction are put forward in relation to quality standards and pre‐award publicity.

Originality/value

After some time as the Cinderella of crime policies, large‐scale frauds attract greater interest. This paper gives grounds for asking whether, in relation to procurement fraud, a combination of traditional practices and modernisation may outpace anti‐fraud measures.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 5 October 2019

Tobias Aloisi Swai

The case introduces student to basic understanding of banking sector in Tanzania as well as the strategies and struggle to raise capital through shareholders’ funds…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The case introduces student to basic understanding of banking sector in Tanzania as well as the strategies and struggle to raise capital through shareholders’ funds. Application of Banking theory and Pecking order theory is evidenced from the case. The case outlines why the bank struggled to raise capital and what triggers the capital raising strategies. It also give students an opportunity to think about applicable theories of capital structure and bank capital, and strategies the bank could use to rescue its capital crunch in the future.

Case overview/synopsis

The case provides details of how the Capital Community Bank (CCB) raised its capital through strategic financial engineering which enabled it to raise the minimum regulatory capital required to be licensed as a financial institution unit, to a regional financial institution, to a fully fledged commercial bank. The bank started with a paid up capital of TZS 472.3m in 2002, involving four Local Government Authorities and individual investors. Capital raised to TZS 31.3bn in 2014 and down to TZS 20.6bn at the end of 2016. The minimum regulatory capital required is TZS 15bn, while paid up capital was 16.9bn. With the change of the management team in 2017, the bank is looking for avenues to raise further capital to meet the regulatory limits and continue to survive as a commercial bank, given dramatic changes in the banking sector in Tanzania.

Complexity academic level

The case is suitable for third year students in Bachelor of Commerce/Economics specializing in banking/financial services. It also suits postgraduate/master's students seeking a Postgraduate Diploma or Master of Business Administration in financial institutions/banking course.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 1: Accounting and Finance.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Terence Lam

Public-sector construction clients in the UK and Australia have a clear objective to maximise potential and value for construction and infrastructure projects…

Abstract

Purpose

Public-sector construction clients in the UK and Australia have a clear objective to maximise potential and value for construction and infrastructure projects. Outcome-based performance predictive models, which link influencing factors to individual performance outcomes, were developed for the public-sector property management clients. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Combined qualitative-quantitative methods were used to examine the causal relationships between performance outcomes and input economic and job performance factors. Hypotheses on individual relationships generated by a literature review were refined using the findings from a qualitative multiple-case study of three universities, and then tested by a quantitative hierarchical regression analysis using data from 60 consultancies collected from a questionnaire survey sent to the estate management offices of the universities, which form a unique public sector. Each performance project outcome was regressed against influencing factors. Performance predictive models were established in the form of regression equations.

Findings

Five performance outcomes are identified: time, cost, quality, innovations and working relationship with the client. These can be significantly predicted by regression models, based on performance influencing factors of project staff, competence of firm, execution approach, size of firm, consultant framework and competition level.

Research limitations/implications

The performance predictive models developed should be regarded as “conceptual”. Public-sector clients may have different organisation objectives and hence different requirements for performance outcomes, which may further vary according to specific project situations. The models should be adapted to suit individual needs. Adjustments can be made by using the combined qualitative-quantitative methods adopted in this research, thus creating customised models for property management and construction-related clients.

Practical implications

The client’s professional team should focus on the significant performance influencing factors and take advantage of the performance predictive models to select quality consultants. Construction consultants should address the factors in the tender proposals in order to add value to the project and benefit the client.

Originality/value

The existing input-based assessment approach applied at the tender stage cannot guarantee the strategic project objectives to be achieved. The performance predictive models are adaptable for property management and construction disciplines within the wider public sector, thus contributing to achievement of the government construction policy.

Details

Property Management, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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