Search results

1 – 5 of 5
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Jos Akkermans, Annet H. de Lange, Beatrice I.J.M. van der Heijden, Dorien T.A.M. Kooij, Paul G.W. Jansen and Josje S.E. Dikkers

The aging workforce is becoming an increasingly important topic in today’s labor market. However, most scientific research and organizational policies focus on chronological age…

3086

Abstract

Purpose

The aging workforce is becoming an increasingly important topic in today’s labor market. However, most scientific research and organizational policies focus on chronological age as the main determinant of successful aging. Based on life span developmental theories – primarily socioemotional selectivity theory and motivational theory of life span development – the purpose of this paper is to test the added value of using subjective age – in terms of remaining opportunities and remaining time – over and above chronological age in their associations with motivation at work and motivation to work.

Design/methodology/approach

Workers from five different divisions throughout the Netherlands (n=186) from a taxi company participated in the survey study.

Findings

The results from the regression analyses and structural equation modeling analyses support the hypotheses: when subjective age was included in the models, chronological age was virtually unrelated to workers’ intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and motivation to continue to work for one’s organization. Moreover, subjective age was strongly related to work motivation. Specifically, workers who perceived many remaining opportunities were more intrinsically and extrinsically motivated, and those who perceived a lot of remaining time were more motivated across the board.

Originality/value

The findings indicate that subjective age is an important concept to include in studies focussing on successful aging, thereby contributing to life span developmental theories. Further implications for research and practice are discussed.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Josje Dikkers, Marloes van Engen and Claartje Vinkenburg

This study sets out to examine how gender and ambition are related to work hours and the utilization of other flexible work‐home arrangements, and how this use is – in turn …

3350

Abstract

Purpose

This study sets out to examine how gender and ambition are related to work hours and the utilization of other flexible work‐home arrangements, and how this use is – in turn – associated with career‐related outcomes (i.e. job level, and career satisfaction).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 212 Dutch working parents from different organizations participated in a questionnaire survey. Underpinned by an inter‐disciplinary theoretical framework, hypotheses were developed on the associations of gender, ambition, work‐home arrangements and career‐related outcomes.

Findings

It was found that ambitious parents made more use of flexible work‐home arrangements and worked more hours per week than less ambitious parents. This relationship was especially strong for mothers. Furthermore, parents' work hours and utilization of flexible arrangements were positively related to their job level and career satisfaction. Finally, the association of ambition with career‐related outcomes was mediated by work hours.

Practical implications

Employers should support their working parents in using flexible work‐home arrangements, thereby simultaneously assisting them in balancing work with care‐giving responsibilities, preventing them from losing their ambition, and promoting their career success.

Originality/value

The study made a pioneering effort to conceptualise and operationalise career‐related ambition. By showing that utilization of flexible work‐home arrangements is positively related to career success, the study also adds to the business case for these arrangements. Moreover, the study challenges the popular assumption that Dutch women's ambition vanishes into thin air once they become mothers.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Dorien Kooij, Annet de Lange, Paul Jansen and Josje Dikkers

Little is known about the motivation for older workers to work and to remain active in the labor market. Research on age and motivation is limited and, moreover, conceptually…

22676

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about the motivation for older workers to work and to remain active in the labor market. Research on age and motivation is limited and, moreover, conceptually diverse. This paper aims to address age‐related factors that influence the work motivation of older workers. More specifically, it seeks to examine how various conceptualizations of the age factor affect the direction and termination of the motivation to continue to work of older workers.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review of age‐related factors and motivation to continue to work is the approach taken in the paper.

Findings

Results from 24 empirical and nine conceptual studies indicate that most age‐related factors can have a negative impact on the motivation to continue to work of older people. These findings suggest that age‐related factors are important in understanding older workers' motivation to continue to work and that further research is needed to more fully understand the underlying processes that govern how these age‐related factors influence the motivation to continue to work.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the aforementioned findings, the paper was able to formulate a research agenda for future research, such as: a need for a meta‐analysis on age and motivation to determine the actual effect sizes, and additional theoretical attention to the underlying age‐related processes.

Practical implications

Age‐related factors identified in this study, such as declining health and career plateaus, should be addressed by HRM policies. HRM practices that could motivate older workers to continue to work include ergonomic adjustments and continuous career development.

Originality/value

Research on age and motivation is limited and conceptually diverse. This paper is one of the first studies to explore the relations between different conceptualizations of age and motivation.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Josje S.E. Dikkers, Paul G.W. Jansen, Annet H. de Lange, Claartje J. Vinkenburg and Dorien Kooij

This paper sets out to examine proactive personality in relation to job demands, job resources and engagement.

5531

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to examine proactive personality in relation to job demands, job resources and engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study employed a two‐wave complete panel study among 794 Dutch government employees. Based upon the Job Demands‐Resources (JD‐R) model, previous studies, job crafting theories, and Conservation of Resources (COR) theory, hypotheses on the associations of proactive personality with job demands, resources, and engagement were developed.

Findings

Analyses revealed that proactive personality was associated with an increase in engagement 18 months later. Moreover, proactive employees perceiving high social support reported the highest levels of engagement over time.

Research limitations/implications

A first shortcoming is that proactive personality was only measured at one point in time, which restricted the testing of causal relationships of proactive personality with engagement. Second, this study only measured engagement as outcome measure and third variables may have affected the associations of proactive personality with job demands and resources and engagement. Third, only small effect sizes of proactive personality (and job demands and resources) on engagement over time were found. With regard to theoretical implications, this study suggests a refinement of the JD‐R model by perceiving proactive personality as a personal resource which coincides with job resources such as social support and/or is triggered by (low) external job demands in increasing engagement.

Practical implications

Since this study's findings suggest that proactive personality is a personal resource with beneficial effects on employees' levels of work‐related engagement, employers are advised to promote the behavior expressed by proactive employees. When employees are under challenged due to a low level of quantitative job demands or when they want to optimize their work environment in case of high job demands, proactive personality may have a positive impact on their engagement over time, in particular when combined with high levels of support from their colleagues and supervisor.

Originality/value

This study's value consists of its innovative effort to relate proactive personality to engagement 18 months later. In addition, the longitudinal design of this study made it possible to examine the associations of proactive personality, job demands and resources with engagement over time.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Annick Y. van Hattem, Carolin Ossenkop, Josje S.E. Dikkers and Claartje J. Vinkenburg

Even though both values and life roles are intensively studied topics, limited research has been conducted regarding the association between the two. In the context of the Dutch…

Abstract

Purpose

Even though both values and life roles are intensively studied topics, limited research has been conducted regarding the association between the two. In the context of the Dutch public sector, this study therefore examines how life roles and values relate to each other. Moreover, the possible role of gender within these associations is explored. Thereby, the study extends the literature in this domain and increases the understanding of how values and life roles affect the behavior. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzed cross-sectional survey data of 114 employees of the Dutch public sector. Values were operationalized according to the Dolan et al.'s dimensions: emotional-developmental; ethical-social; pragmatic-economic; life roles were measured as “parental” and “occupational”.

Findings

The paper found no direct association between life roles and values. However, the paper found a gender differences suggesting that the more parental role oriented a woman is, the less occupational role oriented she is. In addition, the paper found a negative association between emotional-developmental values and ethical-social values.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the existing literature on life roles and values by examining their mutual association. The paper found that the two concepts – although theoretically related – can be empirically distinguished. For organizations within the public sector, it is relevant to know which and how values and life roles affect their employees. Thereby, organizations can design their strategies, training and development policies, and recruitment activities in order to attract and retain (potential) employees.

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5