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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2020

Bin Hu, Aaron McCune Stein and Yanhua Mao

Based on the socioemotional selectivity theory, this study aims to explore the differential influences of control and commitment human resource (HR) practices on employee…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the socioemotional selectivity theory, this study aims to explore the differential influences of control and commitment human resource (HR) practices on employee job crafting as well as the mediating role of occupational future time perspective (OFTP).

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a two-wave design to survey 53 HR managers and 339 employees of 53 Chinese firms. The hypotheses were tested by conducting multilevel structural equation modeling in Mplus 7.4.

Findings

The results show that control HR practices are negatively related to job crafting, while commitment HR practices are positively related to job crafting. Further, control HR practices are negatively associated with the remaining opportunities dimension of OFTP, whereas commitment HR practices are positively associated with remaining opportunities. However, both types of HR practices have no significant relationship with the remaining time dimension of OFTP. Finally, remaining opportunities mediate the relationships between both types of HR practices and job crafting.

Practical implications

Managers should be aware of how to promote or inhibit employee job crafting by implementing different HR practices.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the job crafting research by demonstrating that the relationship between HR practices and job crafting depends on the type of HR practices in use, as well as contributing to OFTP research by showing that different types of HR practices have differential relationships with the remaining opportunities dimension of OFTP.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Hélène Henry and Donatienne Desmette

In the context of workforce aging, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of occupational future time perspective (OFTP) in the relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

In the context of workforce aging, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of occupational future time perspective (OFTP) in the relationship between work–family enrichment (WF-E) and two well-being outcomes (i.e. work engagement and emotional exhaustion). In addition, the moderating role of age on the relationship between WF-E and OFTP, and consequently, on the indirect effects of WF-E on work engagement and emotional exhaustion through OFTP, will be examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional survey research (n=263) was conducted in a public sector company in Belgium. Structural equation modeling and bootstrap analyses were performed to investigate the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The dimension “remaining opportunities” of OFTP mediated the positive relationship between WFE and work engagement, and the negative relationship between WFE and emotional exhaustion. Chronological age moderated the positive relationship between WFE and the dimension “remaining time” of OFTP, with stronger effects among older workers.

Research limitations/implications

This research has confirmed that OFTP is influenced by WFE and that WFE matters, especially for older workers. Future research should continue to study the effects of the work–family interface on older workers.

Practical implications

Age management practices should take WFE into consideration when managing an aging workforce. In particular, older workers may benefit from WFE to increase their perception of remaining opportunities at work, which, in turn, increase well-being.

Originality/value

This study contributes evidence for the role of personal resources (i.e. remaining opportunities) in the relationship between WF-E and well-being at work.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Eduardo Oliveira

Drawing on social exchange theory and socio-emotional selectivity theory, this paper examines the role of occupational future time perspective (OFTP) in the relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on social exchange theory and socio-emotional selectivity theory, this paper examines the role of occupational future time perspective (OFTP) in the relationship between age-inclusive HR practices (AIHRP) and the thriving of older workers.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-wave cross-sectional design was adopted with bootstrapped parallel multiple mediation analyses. In addition, polynomial regression with response surface analysis was used to examine the extent to which combinations of focus on opportunities and remaining time relate to thriving at work. Data were collected from 310 older workers working in 13 companies located in Portugal.

Findings

AIHRP have direct effects on OFTP dimensions (i.e. focus on opportunities and remaining time), and indirect effects on the two thriving dimensions (i.e. learning and vitality) via focus on opportunities. The positive relationship between AIHRP and learning was mediated by remaining time, while no significant mediating effect on vitality through remaining time was found. Additionally, surface analysis showed that overall thriving and learning increase more sharply when focus on opportunities is higher than remaining time, rather than vice versa.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by showing the importance of personal resources like OFTP in the relationship between AIHRP and the thriving of older workers. It also provides further support for the distinctiveness of the two OFTP dimensions as remaining time was not linked to vitality, whereas focus on opportunities was linked to both thriving dimensions.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Jos Akkermans, Annet H. de Lange, Beatrice I.J.M. van der Heijden, Dorien T.A.M. Kooij, Paul G.W. Jansen and Josje S.E. Dikkers

The aging workforce is becoming an increasingly important topic in today’s labor market. However, most scientific research and organizational policies focus on…

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2507

Abstract

Purpose

The aging workforce is becoming an increasingly important topic in today’s labor market. However, most scientific research and organizational policies focus on chronological age as the main determinant of successful aging. Based on life span developmental theories – primarily socioemotional selectivity theory and motivational theory of life span development – the purpose of this paper is to test the added value of using subjective age – in terms of remaining opportunities and remaining time – over and above chronological age in their associations with motivation at work and motivation to work.

Design/methodology/approach

Workers from five different divisions throughout the Netherlands (n=186) from a taxi company participated in the survey study.

Findings

The results from the regression analyses and structural equation modeling analyses support the hypotheses: when subjective age was included in the models, chronological age was virtually unrelated to workers’ intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and motivation to continue to work for one’s organization. Moreover, subjective age was strongly related to work motivation. Specifically, workers who perceived many remaining opportunities were more intrinsically and extrinsically motivated, and those who perceived a lot of remaining time were more motivated across the board.

Originality/value

The findings indicate that subjective age is an important concept to include in studies focussing on successful aging, thereby contributing to life span developmental theories. Further implications for research and practice are discussed.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Tracy Anderson and Martine R. Haas

How is the performance of a knowledge worker affected by the departure of a colleague? While prior research has highlighted the aggregate impact of knowledge worker…

Abstract

How is the performance of a knowledge worker affected by the departure of a colleague? While prior research has highlighted the aggregate impact of knowledge worker mobility on firms, in this chapter we look inside the firm, to explore the individual-level impact of a coworker's departure on the performance of a remaining employee. We propose that the departure of a coworker can change the remaining employee's access to knowledge, but the implications of such changes will depend on the nature of the coworker's relationship with the employee: the employee's performance will be negatively affected to the extent that the relationship is collaborative, but it will be positively affected to the extent that the relationship is competitive. Moreover, these effects will be magnified to the extent that the employee was dependent on the coworker for knowledge access prior to the move, but weakened to the extent that the relationship persists after the move. Our knowledge-based perspective on coworker departures advances research on employee mobility and knowledge flows by highlighting the variety of changes in knowledge access that may result when a colleague leaves the firm, and illuminating the implications of these changes for the performance of employees who remain behind.

Details

Employee Inter- and Intra-Firm Mobility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-550-5

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Dominik Emanuel Froehlich, Simon Beausaert and Mien Segers

The demographic shift and the rapid rate of innovations put age and employability high on policy makers’ and human resource managers’ agenda. However, the authors do not…

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1819

Abstract

Purpose

The demographic shift and the rapid rate of innovations put age and employability high on policy makers’ and human resource managers’ agenda. However, the authors do not sufficiently understand the link between these concepts. The authors set out to investigate the relationship between age and employability and aim to identify motivational mediators of this relationship. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the roles of future time perspective and goal orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted quantitative, cross-sectional survey research (n=282) in three Dutch and Austrian organizations. The authors used structural equation modeling to investigate the relationships between chronological age, future time perspective, goal orientations, and employability.

Findings

Future time perspective and goal orientation strongly relate to employability. The authors found indirect relationships between age and employability via perceived remaining opportunities.

Research limitations/implications

The results question the often simplistic use of chronological age in employability and human resource management research. Therefore, the authors call for more research to investigate the relationship between age and employability more deeply.

Practical implications

The findings contribute new insights for the career development issues of an increasingly older workforce. This shifts the focus from age, a factor outside our control, to motivation.

Originality/value

This study contributes evidence for the relationships of chronological age, future time perspective, and goal orientation with employability. It extends literature by criticizing the prevalent use of chronological age and investigating mediation effects.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Ludo Cuyvers

A decision support model is presented and discussed which aims at identifying realistic export opportunities for a given exporting country. The model consists of a…

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4395

Abstract

A decision support model is presented and discussed which aims at identifying realistic export opportunities for a given exporting country. The model consists of a screening process of four consecutive filters, through which relevant information on markets (such as country risk indicators, macroeconomic data, imports per product group, etc.) is fed, and which allows the identification and deletion of less interesting market opportunities. Results are reported of the application of this decision support model to the case of Thailand, adapted for an analysis of foreign trade data at the SITC four‐digit level up to 1997. These results are compared with previous results obtained using the same model. In this way, Thailand's export opportunities in individual countries, and in the Asia‐Pacific region in particular, are listed and categorised according to criteria such as import market characteristics and Thailand's market share in the various markets.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2020

Willian Boschetti Adamczyk and Adelar Fochezatto

This article aims to measure inequality of income and opportunities at the national and state levels in Brazil, highlighting their acceptable and unacceptable components.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to measure inequality of income and opportunities at the national and state levels in Brazil, highlighting their acceptable and unacceptable components.

Design/methodology/approach

To this end, a lower-bound estimate of income inequality (MLD) and inequality of opportunity (IOp) was developed using data from the National Household Sample Survey between 2001 and 2014.

Findings

It shows that the disparity of income measured by the MLD decreased 26.7 percent, while IOp measured by the IOp decreased 25.6 percent during that period. The decline in total inequality can be attributed to a 48.5 percent decrease of its unfair component and 51.5 percent decrease of its fair component. The average income of the most disadvantaged group (non-white women working in the informal sector) is shown to be only 29.5 percent of the income of the most advantaged group (formally employed white men). The groups at the greatest disadvantage were most benefited by the increase in income.

Originality/value

Beyond comparisons among countries, analysis at the subnational level make it possible to identify how the process that generates inequality acts in each state, revealing patterns undetected in the aggregate analysis. Its decomposition generates two products that are useful to policy-makers. The first is a base estimate of the degree of IOp present in society, which may be expressed as an indicator of the degree of IOp. The second examines the portion of total inequality attributable to IOp.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2019

A. Mohammed Abubakar, Taraneh Foroutan and Khaled Jamal Megdadi

Psychological capital (PsyCap) and future time perspective (FTP) are ambassadors of positivity among incumbent employees in organisations. However, remarkably little is…

Abstract

Purpose

Psychological capital (PsyCap) and future time perspective (FTP) are ambassadors of positivity among incumbent employees in organisations. However, remarkably little is known regarding the effectiveness of high-performance work systems (HPWS) in nurturing these constructs. The purpose of this study is to contribute and provide a complete frame of reference linking HPWS to PsyCap and FTP.

Design/methodology/approach

A synthesis analysis of existing literature was carried out to formulate managerial and practical propositions.

Findings

Drawing on the conservation of resources theory, affective events theory and Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model, the present study proposes a research framework that links HPWS, FTP and PsyCap, with possible mediation effect of FTP in HPWS–PsyCap relationship and PsyCap in HPWS–FTP relationship.

Practical implications

Although this paper did not test the model empirically, it offers important practical implications in terms of PsyCap and FTP perception development through HPWS practices.

Originality/value

A set of propositions that explain the relationships between the study variables is presented to enrich the understanding with organisation’s HRM practices and its possible impact on employees.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 1991

Helga B. Foss

The Revenue Act of 1987 and the Technical and Miscellaneous Revenue Act of 1988 have effectively eliminated the preferred stock recapitalization and other estate freeze…

Abstract

The Revenue Act of 1987 and the Technical and Miscellaneous Revenue Act of 1988 have effectively eliminated the preferred stock recapitalization and other estate freeze techniques. Instead of helping small businesses and individual tax payers by simplifying the tax structure and lowering tax rates, it has become impossible for many small business people to pass on the family business because of prohibitively high estate tax rates, encouraging owners to sell to outsiders, and forcing heirs to sell the family business to raise funds to pay the estate tax. This article examines these provisions and suggests some planning opportunities for small business owners.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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