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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Robert E. Ankli and Ralph Palliam

This paper recognizes self determination theory (SDT) as a model to successfully motivate an organization's workforce and recommends SDT as a more encompassing theory of…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper recognizes self determination theory (SDT) as a model to successfully motivate an organization's workforce and recommends SDT as a more encompassing theory of motivation. Consequently, motivation assumes a different dimension and it therefore becomes necessary to consider issues associated with autonomous motivation, controlled motivation, and motivation as a predictor of performance. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper initially identifies the underlying assumptions of motivation that include: people having the capacity for responsible actions, a natural aspiration to learning and understanding things, and the desire to do good at work and play. The paper then proceeds to addresses several basic issues associated with SDT, namely, cognitive, affective and psycho‐motor development. Finally, it considers perception of the self, one's psychological and emotional needs, life goals and aspirations, individual dynamism, culture and the impact of social environments as key issues that determine one's ability to self‐actualize.

Findings

The study shows SDT's relevance to discussions in organizational behavior. The findings suggest that extrinsic motivation can be deleterious to intrinsic motivation. Work‐related happiness is acquired when individuals use their personality as a motivation determinant to fulfill a mission that is meaningful to themselves too. Individuals are most resourceful and innovative when they feel motivated largely as a result of their interest, their inner satisfaction, and challenges of the work itself and not by external pressures or incentives.

Practical implications

In this regard it is recommended that human resources professionals and/or managers need to consider issues associated with autonomous motivation, controlled motivation, and motivation as a predictor of performance. Different attitudinal relationships towards work‐play necessitate distinct types of motivation. Should work and play become homogeneous, the defining role of human resources management in relation to motivation needs revisiting in particular SDT

Originality/value

This paper adds to the academic literature on motivation in a somewhat different vein by presenting autonomy, competence, and relatedness in SDT as vitally essential for psychological growth, optimal functioning, and well‐being in any fields of endeavor. The study identifies extrinsic rewards as undermining intrinsic motivation in most circumstances.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Sunan Babar Khan, David G. Proverbs and Hong Xiao

Health and safety in small construction firms is often neglected by owners leading to poor health and safety performance and unacceptably high fatality and injury rates. A…

Abstract

Purpose

Health and safety in small construction firms is often neglected by owners leading to poor health and safety performance and unacceptably high fatality and injury rates. A body of knowledge has established significant links between the motivational behaviours of operatives towards health and safety. Motivation is also considered as a key tool for improving operative productivity as when operatives experience safe worksites, they can carry out their work in a more productive manner. The purpose of this research is to develop a framework to examine the motivational factors that affect operative health and safety in small construction firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical review and synthesis of the body of knowledge incorporating motivational theory, health and safety literature and the factors which characterise small firms, is used to develop the framework.

Findings

Key components of the framework include the presence of intrinsic and extrinsic components, appropriate health and safety policies and procedures, the type of work environment, the operatives (i.e. attitude, experience and training) as well as the presence of appropriate management and supervision. The study revealed that operatives in small firms are less likely to be extrinsically motivated due to the absence of training, management commitment, policies and the wider working environment

Research limitations/implications

Failure of motivational support can result in increased danger and risk in exposing operatives to injury in the small firm environment. In this context, the damage caused to operative's health and safety in small construction firms is dependent mainly on the extrinsic factors.

Practical implications

The framework provides a basis for improving our understanding of how to motivate operatives to act safely and will help to improve the health and safety performance of small firms. It is therefore vital to emphasise enhancement efforts on these extrinsic strategies in the small firms' environment especially in the initial stages of the project (or activity), so that the health and safety of operatives in small firms can be improved.

Originality/value

This study proposes a contribution in developing an understanding of the motivational factors and their influence on the health and safety of operatives in small construction firms. The study revealed that operatives in small firms are less likely to be extrinsically motivated and have only intrinsically motivated elements in their workplace. The study proposes an indirect link between the extrinsic and intrinsic factors that affect motivation.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2020

Ma Liang, Zhang Xin, Ding Xiao Yan and Fei Jianxiang

While prior research provides interesting insights into the effect of social media use in enterprises, there is limited research on how use of different social media…

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1134

Abstract

Purpose

While prior research provides interesting insights into the effect of social media use in enterprises, there is limited research on how use of different social media platforms affects employee job satisfaction and work efficiency. This study developed a research model to investigate how public and private social media platforms used for different motivations affect employee job satisfaction and work efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

Online surveys were conducted in China, generating 453 valid responses for analysis. Structural equation modeling is performed to test the research model and hypotheses.

Findings

The results suggest that (1) public social media used for both work- and social-related motivations positively affects employee job satisfaction, while private social media only used for social-related motivations can contribute to employee job satisfaction. (2) Public and private social media used for work-related motivations can contribute to employee work efficiency, while social-related motivations for use of public and private social media and employee work efficiency are not significant. (3) In the process of social media usage influencing employee job satisfaction and work efficiency, employees of different genders show significant differences.

Originality/value

First, this paper contributes to information systems social media research by examining the joint effects of different motivations for public and private social media usage on employee job satisfaction and work efficiency in organizations. Second, it contributes to uses and gratification theory by clarifying the relationship between different motivations for enterprise social media use and its needs.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Jos Akkermans, Annet H. de Lange, Beatrice I.J.M. van der Heijden, Dorien T.A.M. Kooij, Paul G.W. Jansen and Josje S.E. Dikkers

The aging workforce is becoming an increasingly important topic in today’s labor market. However, most scientific research and organizational policies focus on…

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2466

Abstract

Purpose

The aging workforce is becoming an increasingly important topic in today’s labor market. However, most scientific research and organizational policies focus on chronological age as the main determinant of successful aging. Based on life span developmental theories – primarily socioemotional selectivity theory and motivational theory of life span development – the purpose of this paper is to test the added value of using subjective age – in terms of remaining opportunities and remaining time – over and above chronological age in their associations with motivation at work and motivation to work.

Design/methodology/approach

Workers from five different divisions throughout the Netherlands (n=186) from a taxi company participated in the survey study.

Findings

The results from the regression analyses and structural equation modeling analyses support the hypotheses: when subjective age was included in the models, chronological age was virtually unrelated to workers’ intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and motivation to continue to work for one’s organization. Moreover, subjective age was strongly related to work motivation. Specifically, workers who perceived many remaining opportunities were more intrinsically and extrinsically motivated, and those who perceived a lot of remaining time were more motivated across the board.

Originality/value

The findings indicate that subjective age is an important concept to include in studies focussing on successful aging, thereby contributing to life span developmental theories. Further implications for research and practice are discussed.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Mark Shields

The literature of human motivation in a work setting is reviewed. The main theories are those of individual needs, equity and expectancy/value. This is followed by an…

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2625

Abstract

The literature of human motivation in a work setting is reviewed. The main theories are those of individual needs, equity and expectancy/value. This is followed by an examination of the relationship between motivation and methods of job and work design. Particular emphasis is placed on the practical value of strategies resulting from these theories. The area of application for these principles is academic libraries, the main characteristics of which are identified. These include the influence of environmental factors, such as technological innovation and economic recession, the nature of the higher education system and the user community. This is followed by an analysis of library staff attitudes and the nature of library work. The division between professional and non‐professional staff is seen as particularly important in this context. The theories of motivation and work design are then applied to academic libraries and some gaps in the literature identified. The emphasis on higher order needs and lack of theory on motivation and the social aspects of work are noted. An outline of the most useful theories is offered and the importance of library managers remaining responsive to local needs is stressed.

Details

Library Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 23 December 2019

Jinda Kongcharoen, Nutthajit Onmek, Panaya Jandang and Sukanya Wangyisen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the levels of stress and work motivation of primary and secondary school teachers, investigate factors affecting stress of teachers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the levels of stress and work motivation of primary and secondary school teachers, investigate factors affecting stress of teachers and validate the consistency of the model and empirical data.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of 400 teachers of primary and secondary schools. Questionnaire was implemented as the instrument and the data were analyzed by t-test, ANOVA and confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings

The results indicated that teachers of secondary schools have higher overall stress than teachers of primary schools for many reasons, such as financial issues and work obligations. Stress was found to be significantly positively associated with work motivation in secondary school teachers. The study revealed that demographic and work motivation factors influence teacher stress. The validation of a goodness of fitted model demonstrated an acceptable model fit with empirical data (χ2 test/df = 1.913, GFI = 0.934, CFI = 0.965, NFI = 0.930, AGFI = 0.893).

Originality/value

Teachers under stress could negatively influence their students’ academic performance and might be more vulnerable to occupational diseases. Therefore, the teachers should find favorite activities that reduce stress and thereby contribute to effective teaching. This study would be beneficial for anyone who works to support teachers and wants to reduce turnover among teachers.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

A.D. Amar

Grounding in the premise that motivation in a knowledge work environment is an outcome of the existence of certain antecedents that are responsive to the dynamics of…

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24986

Abstract

Grounding in the premise that motivation in a knowledge work environment is an outcome of the existence of certain antecedents that are responsive to the dynamics of motivation in this environment, this work develops a conceptual model synthesizing motivations “what” and “how” that will bring human creativity in organizations which thrive on innovation. The presented model embodies these dynamics into five drivers of motivation practice in the knowledge work environment and then leads to three sources of motivation into which its antecedents should be loaded to motivate knowledge employees for innovation.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Maree Roche and Jarrod Haar

Increasingly, leaders are faced with complex, difficult and demanding situations that challenge their very sense of self, including their workplace wellbeing. It has been…

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1213

Abstract

Purpose

Increasingly, leaders are faced with complex, difficult and demanding situations that challenge their very sense of self, including their workplace wellbeing. It has been suggested that this challenge can be mitigated for leaders by pursuing goals and activities that reflect their beliefs, interests and values. As such, leaders whose motivations reflect intrinsic and self-congruent beliefs and values are likely to experience beneficial wellbeing, yet, reviewing this from a self-determination theory (SDT) lens, the authors find this assertion remains to be fully tested. Concurrently, the work–family enrichment (WFE) literature highlights that potential positive synergies exist between work and home. The authors further argue that this synergy may also provide greater insight and understanding into the quality of leaders’ motivation and wellbeing, and as such also requires attention. As such, the purpose of this paper is to examine the path to wellbeing for leaders and includes leaders’ “whole lives” (including enrichment) and not just their work lives (motivations).

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative research including two studies of 386 junior/senior leaders and 205 CEOs, investigated the role of motivation as defined by SDT and WFE towards leaders’ job satisfaction. Hypotheses were tested using SEM in AMOS to assess the direct and meditational effects of the study variables.

Findings

A partial mediation model was found to best fit the data for both studies. In study 1, the effects of self-determined motivation dimensions on job satisfaction were fully mediated by WFE and family–work enrichment (FWE). However, the non-self-determined dimensions of SDT motivations were directly and negatively related to job satisfaction and enrichment. In study 2, self-determined forms of motivation were positively related to WFE and FWE and job satisfaction, while only WFE was positively related to job satisfaction. The non-self-determined dimensions of SDT motivations were directly and negatively related to WFE and job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Overall, both studies show that the influence of motivations on job satisfaction of leaders is better understood through enrichment. As such organisations are encouraged to enhance both leader’s motivations, and enrichment, in order to facilitate a path to job satisfaction.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to test over two studies and levels of leadership, motivation and enrichment for leaders. As such this paper provides a novel “path” to wellbeing that includes aspects of the leaders’ motivation, as well as the importance of leaders’ enrichment and home domain. Overall the authors suggest that leaders’ “whole” lives play a role in their job satisfaction, and this is important to understand as the authors try to resource leaders, who work in an increasingly demanding workplace environment.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2018

Muhammad Al-Musadieq, Nurjannah Nurjannah, Kusdi Raharjo, Solimun Solimun and Adji Achmad Rinaldo Fernandes

The purpose of this paper is to know the effect of mediation of work motivation on the influence of job design and organizational culture on human resource performance.

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4896

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to know the effect of mediation of work motivation on the influence of job design and organizational culture on human resource performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The design of the study is the detailed planning used as a study guide that leads to the purpose of the study. The unit of analysis of this research is the expert and skilled labor of construction service actors working in the national consulting company PT. Yodya Karya (Persero) at the central level and branches spread over 11 branches in Indonesian territory. Data analysis method used is path analysis and Sobel test to test the indirect effect (mediation effect).

Findings

Based on the results of the analysis, several things can be concluded such as: there is a significant direct influence of work design on the performance of human resources and work motivation; there is a significant direct influence of organizational culture on work motivation and human resource performance; and there is a significant direct influence of work motivation on human resource performance. There is an indirect influence of work design on the performance of human resources through work motivation mediation variables. Meanwhile, work motivation is not the influence of organizational culture on human resource performance.

Originality/value

The originality of this research lies in forming the mediator variable that is the work motivation on the causal relationship of two variables and adding new variables of work design on the effect on the human resource performance.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Ginger Woodard, Nancy Cassili and David Herr

With the many challenges facing retailers, continued attention should be given to the effective and efficient performance of retail personnel. It is unknown how various…

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1496

Abstract

With the many challenges facing retailers, continued attention should be given to the effective and efficient performance of retail personnel. It is unknown how various organisational strutures which result from reorganisation affect psychological climate beliefs and individual's motivation among retail managers. Among the antecedents of motivation, psychological climate has been regarded as one of the most significant contributors to an individual's motivation. The conceptual framework was the Vroom Expectancy Theory (VIE) of Work Motivation (1964). The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of management group structure and demographic characteristics on psychological climate and work motivation of management personnel within the retail industry as illustrated by the experience of a department store with substantial apparel interests. Results confirmed that three subscales of psychological climate (Job Importance, Leader Goal Emphasis, Organisational Identification) in the presence of management group structure and age were significant in predicting work motivation. Results from ANOVA provided evidence that six of the 13 psychological climate subscales were significantly different across management groups. Contrast statements provided evidence that there was a difference between management groups on the six significant psychological climate subscales. Work motivation did not appear to differ significantly across retail management groups. This suggests that human resource strategies for the retail environment can be developed by analysing the store's work environment, examining the reward structure, and examining each management group structure to determine how retail organisations can encourage employee retention.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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