Search results

1 – 10 of 678
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Robert J. Snowden, Jordan Holt, Nicola Simkiss, Aimee Smith, Daniel Webb and Nicola S. Gray

Wales Applied Risk Research Network (WARRN) is a formulation-based technique for the assessment and management of serious risk (e.g. violence to others, suicide, etc.) for users…

1294

Abstract

Purpose

Wales Applied Risk Research Network (WARRN) is a formulation-based technique for the assessment and management of serious risk (e.g. violence to others, suicide, etc.) for users of mental health services. It has been gradually adopted as the risk evaluation and safety-planning technique for all seven health boards in Wales. The purpose of this paper is to examine the opinions of WARRN as used within these health boards.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was disseminated to NHS clinicians in secondary mental health services to evaluate their perceptions of the use and effectiveness of WARRN. Data from 486 clinicians were analysed with both quantitative and qualitative methods.

Findings

Results indicated that the overall impact of WARRN on secondary mental health care was very positive, with clinicians reporting increased skills in the domains of clinical risk formulation, safety-planning and communication, as well as increased confidence in their skills and abilities in these areas. Clinicians also reported that the “common-language” created by having all NHS health boards in Wales using the same risk assessment process facilitated the communication of safety-planning. Crucially, NHS staff believed that the safety of service users and of the general public had increased due to the adoption of WARRN in their health board and many believed that lives had been saved as a result.

Originality/value

WARRN is perceived to have improved clinical skills in risk assessment and safety-planning across Wales and saved lives.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Robert A Rhoads

In this paper I seek to contribute to a growing understanding of the role of the self in qualitative forms of research and narrative. In calling upon the work of symbolic…

Abstract

In this paper I seek to contribute to a growing understanding of the role of the self in qualitative forms of research and narrative. In calling upon the work of symbolic interactionists, postmodernists, and feminists, I explore how self-narrative might inform our scholarly work, both in terms of creating more advanced self-understandings and in promoting open and honest discussions about how our personal and professional lives intersect. After reviewing the philosophical rationale as well as various uses of self-narrative in social science and educational research, I examine my own deployment of self-reflexive writing as part of an effort to bridge the chasm between my personal life and my life in the academy.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-009-8

Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

George Burruss, Christian Jordan Howell, Adam Bossler and Thomas J. Holt

Cybercrime is the greatest threat facing law enforcement agencies in England and Wales. Although these crimes are transnational by nature, the burden of response has been placed…

Abstract

Purpose

Cybercrime is the greatest threat facing law enforcement agencies in England and Wales. Although these crimes are transnational by nature, the burden of response has been placed on line officers. Not all officers, however, believe they are capable of responding to calls involving cybercrime. The current study, using latent class analysis (LCA) on a large sample of English and Welsh officers, finds two types of officers: those prepared (39 percent) and those unprepared (61 percent). Using logistic regression to predict who falls into either classification, the authors find that training and age are the best predictors of latent membership. Implications for policy and future research are discussed. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors used LCA to determine the number and character of unobserved categories of officers in how they deal with cybercrime.

Findings

The LCA indicated there are two distinct categories of police in the English and Welsh constabulary: those prepared (39 percent) and those unprepared (61 percent). Training and age were the two key determinants of this classification.

Research limitations/implications

LCA is an exploratory analysis technique that requires additional validation to confirm the findings of any one study.

Practical implications

The salience of training in helping officers feel prepared to deal with cybercrime cases as well as victims was demonstrated. A full 60 percent of the officers in this study fell in the “unprepared” category, which continues to highlight the limitations of local police to handle cybercrime cases; nevertheless, almost 40 percent of officer could be considered ready when responding to cybercrimes.

Social implications

As the harm cybercrime brings to our financial and social well-being, law enforcement agencies will be required to improve their response capabilities. Most current cybercrime responses address technical issues related to online fraud and abuse, but officers often perceive the problem as outside their legal and geographic jurisdiction. Knowing how officers perceive cybercrime as well as their own capabilities will allow us to begin changing enforcement policies, training capacity and individual response efficacy.

Originality/value

This study involved a sample of English and Welsh constables and sergeants to classify their cybercrime readiness. The analysis and particular data are unique to the study of cybercrime.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Ali A. Al‐Thuneibat, Basheer Ahmad Khamees and Nedal A. Al‐Fayoumi

This study aims at investigating the effect of the qualified audit reports on shares prices and returns in Jordan.

4033

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at investigating the effect of the qualified audit reports on shares prices and returns in Jordan.

Design/methodology/approach

A market‐based study conducted on the qualified audit reports of the shareholding companies in Jordan during the period 2000‐2005.

Findings

The conclusions of the study showed that there is no clear or significant effect of a qualified audit opinion on share prices and returns.

Practical implications

Based on the conclusions of the study, the researchers recommend there is a need for further educating users of the role of the audit report and the need for extending this study to investigate the effect of the qualified audit reports on share prices and returns during other periods and using different test periods other than the announcement date.

Originality/value

This study is original because it provides us with new evidence about the effect of qualified audit reports on shares prices and returns in a developing country.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2020

Rana Zayadin, Antonella Zucchella, Nisreen Ameen and Craig Duckworth

The purpose of this study is to capture the variation in entrepreneurs' understandings and experiences through which they contextualise cultural factors within a national setting…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to capture the variation in entrepreneurs' understandings and experiences through which they contextualise cultural factors within a national setting to articulate how they use their knowledge and social capabilities to advance their activity.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts an interpretivist approach through which culture is investigated at the individual level. Phenomenography is used as a methodology to capture the variation in the entrepreneurs own understanding and experiences of the cultural factors.

Findings

The findings introduce four different understandings and eight experiences to explore how entrepreneurs contextualise culture in their environment. The findings present a change in the role of culture in influencing entrepreneurial social capabilities and confidence; and a change in the local culture from collectivism to individualism. Furthermore, the findings show how entrepreneurs use their knowledge, experience and understanding to achieve socially driven acts to pursue economic value, integration and acceptance.

Research limitations/implications

We encourage further research in the Middle-East region to examine the model and identify other factors that affect entrepreneurial behaviour, including the important developments with regard to women entrepreneurs. While Jordan has embarked on introducing policy level changes to support entrepreneurship, the findings report that the culture of collectivism is changing. This requires a longitudinal research to capture the change and its implication on entrepreneurial activity in Jordan and its impact on unemployment and economic value.

Practical implications

In terms of practical contribution, the study introduces a policy level contribution by answering the question presented by the GEM report (2014) pointing out the high entrepreneurial opportunity identification in Jordan, yet the country has the lowest entrepreneurial activity in the region. Although the report pointed out issues in policy and institutional support the role of culture was not addressed. The study recommendation is to celebrate and entrepreneurial activity and introduce entrepreneurial studies at schools to influence a positive change.

Social implications

We addressed some of the several calls to further investigate and understand the role of culture, how entrepreneurs contextualise it (Foss and Klein, 2012; Garud et al., 2016; Zahra et al., 2014; Welter et al., 2019). Our research provides a fertile ground for further enquiries that pose questions such as “What other factors do entrepreneurs contextualise in their environment?” and “how these factors are contextualised?” The use of phenomenography as an interpretive methodology might therefore assist in revealing further shared understandings of the variation in entrepreneurs' behaviours. Further research on capturing “understanding” presents the complex forms of interactions and mechanism in the cognitive world of the entrepreneurs (Barandiaran et al., 2009; Brannback and Carsrud, 2016).

Originality/value

In this study, phenomenography has enabled new insights into the multiplicity and idiosyncratic role of culture within a national setting and introduces a model of social capability and integration which capture the contextualisation of cultural factors. The study contributes to entrepreneurship literature as follows: first, the implicit assumption in this research is that culture is an active construct that entrepreneurs understand, experience and also influence; second, the variation in entrepreneurs' outcomes is based on their subjective and personal understandings which form the ways of contextualisation. Third, the variation in understanding and experiences captures the different ways entrepreneurs use their social capabilities to achieve integration and economic value.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Neal M. Ashkanasy, Ashlea C. Troth, Sandra A. Lawrence and Peter J. Jordan

Scholars and practitioners in the OB literature nowadays appreciate that emotions and emotional regulation constitute an inseparable part of work life, but the HRM literature has…

Abstract

Scholars and practitioners in the OB literature nowadays appreciate that emotions and emotional regulation constitute an inseparable part of work life, but the HRM literature has lagged in addressing the emotional dimensions of life at work. In this chapter therefore, beginning with a multi-level perspective taken from the OB literature, we introduce the roles played by emotions and emotional regulation in the workplace and discuss their implications for HRM. We do so by considering five levels of analysis: (1) within-person temporal variations, (2) between persons (individual differences), (3) interpersonal processes; (4) groups and teams, and (5) the organization as a whole. We focus especially on processes of emotional regulation in both self and others, including discussion of emotional labor and emotional intelligence. In the opening sections of the chapter, we discuss the nature of emotions and emotional regulation from an OB perspective by introducing the five-level model, and explaining in particular how emotions and emotional regulation play a role at each of the levels. We then apply these ideas to four major domains of concern to HR managers: (1) recruitment, selection, and socialization; (2) performance management; (3) training and development; and (4) compensation and benefits. In concluding, we stress the interconnectedness of emotions and emotional regulation across the five levels of the model, arguing that emotions and emotional regulation at each level can influence effects at other levels, ultimately culminating in the organization’s affective climate.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2020

Jacek Koziarski and Jin Ree Lee

This paper explores the various challenges associated with policing cybercrime, arguing that a failure to improve law enforcement responses to cybercrime may negatively impact…

3409

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the various challenges associated with policing cybercrime, arguing that a failure to improve law enforcement responses to cybercrime may negatively impact their institutional legitimacy as reliable first responders. Further, the paper makes preliminary links between cybercrime and the paradigm of evidence-based policing (EBP), providing suggestions on how the paradigm can assist, develop, and improve a myriad of factors associated with policing cybercrime.

Design/methodology/approach

Three examples of prominent cybercrime incidents will be explored under the lens of institutional theory: the cyberextortion of Amanda Todd; the hacking of Ashley Madison; and the 2013 Target data breach.

Findings

EBP approaches to cybercrime can improve the effectiveness of existing and future approaches to cybercrime training, recruitment, as well as officers' preparedness and awareness of cybercrime.

Research limitations/implications

Future research will benefit from determining what types of training work at the local, state/provincial, and federal level, as well as evaluating both current and new cybercrime policing programs and strategies.

Practical implications

EBP approaches to cybercrime have the potential to improve police responses to cybercrime calls for service, save police resources, improve police–public relations during calls for service, and improve police legitimacy.

Originality/value

This paper links cybercrime policing to the paradigm of EBP, highlighting the need for evaluating and implementing effective evidence-based approaches to policing cybercrime.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Mohammed Shurrab, Ghaleb Abbasi and Razan Al Khazaleh

Construction organizations and companies are concerned with the motivational factors of the project managers that influence the project success. Therefore, the purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Construction organizations and companies are concerned with the motivational factors of the project managers that influence the project success. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to use a questionnaire based on five Likert-scales to identify and investigate the importance of the motivational dimensions on the construction project managers in Jordan

Design/methodology/approach

Therefore, this study aims at using a questionnaire based on five Likert-scales to identify and investigate the importance of the motivational dimensions on the construction project managers in Jordan. The six motivational dimensions were interpersonal interaction, task, general working conditions, empowerment, personal development, and compensation. Hypotheses testing were also developed to study the influence of both the characteristics of the project manager and the characteristic of the project on the motivational dimensions.

Findings

The results showed that the construction project managers in Jordan were motivated more by compensation and personal development. Moreover, the level of education for the project manager was positively related to the motivation by task. It was also noticed that the project manager, who had higher experience, was motivated more by empowerment. The study is valuable in providing important information for the construction organizations in Jordan to actively influence the construction project managers’ motivation.

Originality/value

The urgent needs for increasing project managers’ motivation is the major concern for organizations and companies. Increasing the project managers’ motivation has a major influence on increasing the project success rate and productivity. Construction sector is typically country’s most important asset economically and socially. Currently, no studies were shown to investigate the construction project manager’s motivation in Jordan. This study is, therefore, aims to evaluate the factors that influence the construction project manager’s motivation in Jordan based on content and process motivational theories’ perspectives. This research also utilizes the motivational factors instrument to test its validity in Jordan construction sector.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2019

Mamoun N. Akroush, Majdy I. Zuriekat, Hana I. Al Jabali and Nermeen A. Asfour

This paper aims to identify factors affecting consumers’ purchasing intentions of energy-efficient products (energy awareness, perceived benefits, perceived price and consumers’…

3144

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify factors affecting consumers’ purchasing intentions of energy-efficient products (energy awareness, perceived benefits, perceived price and consumers’ attitudes). Also, it examines the effect of consumers’ attitudes on purchasing intentions of energy-efficient products (EEP) from households’ perspectives in Jordan.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered survey was hand-delivered to the targeted sample of households in Amman, Jordan. A total of 516 questionnaires were delivered to households from which 474 were valid for the analysis. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed to assess the research constructs dimensions, unidimensionality, validity and composite reliability. Structural path analysis was also used to test the hypothesised relationships of the proposed research model.

Findings

Energy awareness positively and significantly affects purchasing intentions, perceived benefits and consumer attitudes. Energy awareness negatively but non-significantly affects perceived price. Perceived benefits positively and significantly affect consumer attitudes and purchasing intentions. Further, perceived price negatively and significantly affects perceived benefits and consumers attitudes. Also, consumers’ attitudes positively and significantly affect purchasing intentions. Consumers’ attitudes exerted the strongest effect on purchasing intentions of EEP; meanwhile, consumers’ attitudes are a function of perceived benefits and energy awareness. Finally, the results show that 50 per cent of variation in purchasing intentions of EEP was caused by perceived benefits–consumers’ attitudes–energy awareness path.

Research limitations

Future research needs to investigate other factors that may affect households’ intentions of purchasing EEP such as perceived brand and image of EEP, perceived risk, word-of-mouth, subjective norms and households’ cost-saving experience. Investigating and identifying types of perceived benefits of purchasing EEP from households’ perspectives is also important. Comparative studies between Jordanian and non-Jordanian consumers/households are potential areas of future research. Methodologically, future research can conduct comparative analysis between households and energy industry engineers and managers perceptions’ with regard to determinants of perceived benefits and purchasing intentions.

Practical implications

This paper highlights the crucial role of perceived benefits and energy awareness in formulating households’ attitudes towards EEP and the vital role of such attitudes on purchasing intentions. Marketing directors and CEOs of the energy industry should recognised that perceived benefits, attitudes and energy awareness are vital building blocks in formulating and implementing marketing strategies to operate in this industry. Also, purchase intentions are a function of positive attitudes of household toward EEP and are at the heart of EEP marketing communications campaigns.

Originality/value

This is the first paper in the energy industry of Jordan devoted to develop and test a model of determinants of purchasing intentions of EEP that focuses on energy consumption behaviour. CEOs, international manufacturers and marketing managers of EEP can benefit from the study’s empirical findings concerning the drivers of EEP purchasing intentions and behaviour decisions of households in Jordan as an emerging market in the Middle East.

Article
Publication date: 15 December 2017

Andrea Caputo

The purpose of this research paper is to investigate the role of individual and cultural differences, specifically religious motivation and attitudes toward nepotism, in the…

1344

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research paper is to investigate the role of individual and cultural differences, specifically religious motivation and attitudes toward nepotism, in the selection of conflict management styles (obliging, avoiding, forcing, integrating and compromising), in the Middle-Eastern context.

Design/methodology/approach

The research surveyed a sample of 588 individuals (both Muslims and Christians), representative of the Jordanian population. Data were analyzed through multiple ANOVAs and multiple regressions.

Findings

Results suggest that both religious motivation and attitude toward nepotism affect the choice of conflict management styles, while demographic variables, such as age and gender, do not seem to have an effect.

Originality/value

This paper constitutes one of the first attempts to investigate the conflict management style preferences of a Middle-Eastern society and the role of two important cultural variables, namely, religious motivation and attitudes toward nepotism, which have not been previously investigated by conflict management research.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

1 – 10 of 678