Search results

1 – 10 of 15
Article
Publication date: 16 December 2019

Luis Brites Pereira and John Manuel Luiz

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution of political and economic institutions, their persistence and interdependence and their effects on economic progress…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution of political and economic institutions, their persistence and interdependence and their effects on economic progress in Mozambique.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a unique data set, which has developed detailed long-run indices of institutional change in Mozambique from 1900 onwards, the research utilizes time-series econometrics to estimate cointegration relations and Vector Autoregressive and Vector Error Correction models, and also Granger causality, correlation and residual analysis when interpreting the estimation results.

Findings

It shows support for path dependence in political and economic institutions as well as the critical juncture theory and modernization hypothesis, and for webs of association between these institutions and economic development. It provides evidence of an equilibrium-dependent process, where history does matter (as do early conditions), and whose impact may differ depending on the nature of institutional arrangements. Various institutions created during colonial times have a bearing on the present state of institutions in Mozambique, as reflected in important continuities regarding the forms of political economy, among others.

Originality/value

The work contributes to existing research not only through the employment of a new set of institutional measures, which allows for a particularly long time-series investigation in a developing country setting, but also through its contribution to studies on modernization and critical junctures but in a longitudinal manner which allows for the exploration of complex dynamics embedded within a country’s particular political economy. The implications are far-reaching and carry importance beyond the academy given the pressure on policymakers to get things right because of the persistence of institutions and their consequences and the associated path dependency.

Article
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Zara Hammerschlag, Geoff Bick and John Manuel Luiz

The purpose of this study is to explore how African fintech firms adapt their marketing strategies for successful market expansion into new African countries.

1388

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how African fintech firms adapt their marketing strategies for successful market expansion into new African countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study is qualitative in nature and utilizes semi-structured interviews at 14 African fintech firms.

Findings

The study reveals that, during intra-Africa expansion, firms adapt their marketing strategies by working with local people, prioritizing customer education, creating personal relationships with customers, adapting their communication strategies and pricing strategies and using social media. The strategies that have been most effective involve including the community in the marketing process, prioritizing relationships, segmenting customers geographically, educating customers about products, using local distribution partners and having a flexible approach to strategy adaptation.

Practical implications

It has been argued that technological innovation in Africa in areas such as financial services is a critical driver of its future development, because of the opportunity it presents to promote financial inclusion. Through an increase in venture capital investment on the continent, technological innovations in financial services have grown exponentially, and this study contributes to the understanding of the marketing strategies employed to gain market traction.

Originality/value

This study proposes that African fintech firms adopt a bottom-up, value proposition-driven marketing strategy to successfully navigate the environment. The proposed framework provides a lens through which to understand the components of successful strategy adaptation in Africa, against the backdrop of the unique market challenges inherent in this emerging market continent.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2019

John Manuel Luiz, Kondwani Kachika and Tapfumaneyi Kudzurunga

This paper aims to analyse how processes of institutional change in environments of institutional 'voids' affect smallholder farmer market access in Zambia and Malawi, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse how processes of institutional change in environments of institutional 'voids' affect smallholder farmer market access in Zambia and Malawi, and explores the role of different dis/enabling institutional agents and logics. The authors examine this in the context of two divergent routes of institutional change – one externally imposed and the second driven from within the ecosystem itself. The authors consider how these different institutional processes impact upon smallholder farmers and how they are able to adapt to these changes.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach is used which lends itself to an analysis of multiple institutional logics that is based upon the multiple positions of market actors. It uses a comparative case study design methodology focused on two broad cases of smallholder farmers in Zambia and Malawi.

Findings

The research demonstrates the tension that multiple institutional logics can create especially amongst those most vulnerable particularly where these are not embedded in local realities and mindful of social settings.

Originality/value

It contributes to the understanding of poverty alleviation in rural developing regions, on overcoming institutional voids, market inclusivity and the role of social entrepreneurs and intermediaries, and builds on the perspective of markets as social spaces for economic exchange.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Dirk Hanekom and John Manuel Luiz

The purpose of this paper is to explore the interaction between multinational enterprises (MNEs) and public governance institutions in regions of limited statehood by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the interaction between multinational enterprises (MNEs) and public governance institutions in regions of limited statehood by focusing on three areas of inquiry: first, the impact of MNEs in these environments; second, the mechanisms and levels through which MNEs engage with external governance processes; and finally, the strategic motivation for the mode and level of engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors follow an applied qualitative research approach, drawing on the principles of case study design, through interviews with executives that were involved in setting up four MNEs in Afghanistan.

Findings

The results reveal a relationship between the depth of country embeddedness and the level of engagement of MNEs with public institutions and this is related to issues around risk mitigation and time horizons. Deeper embeddedness in the local markets brings greater exposure to risk leading to more and wider engagement in governance processes and cross-sector partnerships in order to influence these concerns.

Research limitations/implications

The research contributes to institutional theory and demonstrates the interplay between organizations and the institutional surroundings. MNEs in Afghanistan are deeply affected by institutional weakness which contribute toward greater uncertainty and impact their behavior, but MNEs also have a direct bearing on institutions.

Practical implications

In fragile and conflict-affected states, MNEs can contribute toward peace and institution building and reinforce cycles of positive development, or they can further pathological behavior and contribute to conflict.

Social implications

MNEs are increasingly going to be expected to step into the gaps associated with institutional voids and this will require a different approach to doing business and their choice of approach will have a direct bearing on social outcomes in host countries.

Originality/value

The authors reveal two models of MNE engagement in these areas of limited statehood, namely an embedded vs autonomous model and examine their implications.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 55 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Babalwa Nonkenge and John Manuel Luiz

This paper aims to examine how distance manifests in terms of air passenger transport links between countries and focuses on the 48 countries of sub-Saharan Africa (SSA)…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how distance manifests in terms of air passenger transport links between countries and focuses on the 48 countries of sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). It asks to what extent do existing flight connections reflect economic relations between countries, and if so, do they represent past, current or future relations? It asks whether the impact of distance is similar for all countries and at different stages of development.

Design/methodology/approach

Passenger flight connection data were extracted to generate map images and flight frequencies to observe interrelationships between different locations and to observe emerging patterns. The paper uses ESRI’s ArcGIS software to visualise all these data into maps.

Findings

SSA is poorly connected both intra- and inter-continentally. Cultural and historical ties dominate and elements of historical determinism appear within flight connections in SSA reflecting the biases associated with colonialism. Larger economies in SSA are less dependent on these past ties, and their flight connections reveal a greater level of diversity and interests. SSA has generally been slow to develop flight routings to the new emerging markets.

Originality/value

Its contribution lies not only in examining these flight patterns for an under-researched region but also in aiding future work on SSA and its integration into the global economy and international business networks. It argues that whilst distance matters, how it matters varies.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

John Manuel Luiz and Riyas Fadal

The purpose of this study is to develop insight into the socio‐economic determinants of African sports performance. Previous studies have argued that a country's success…

2508

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop insight into the socio‐economic determinants of African sports performance. Previous studies have argued that a country's success in sports is directly related to the economic resources that are available for those sports. However, factors that are used to determine the levels of success for developed countries are not necessarily the same, or bear the same weight, as for developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The premise of this study is to identify specific factors that increase success in sports in developing countries by means of several econometric specifications using cross sectional data for African countries.

Findings

This study finds evidence that suggests that Africa's performance in sports is dependent on a range of socio‐economic factors, which in some respects confirms worldwide studies. Money does indeed matter: GDP was the overwhelmingly consistent dependent variable in all four models tested. Interestingly, important shades of distinction between the various dependent variables are found.

Originality/value

There is a lack of research in the field of sports and organizational economics especially in emerging countries. Previous studies have treated countries as a homogeneous grouping and allowed the broad aggregates to reveal the determinants. This study focuses on a sub‐group of countries that are relatively poor, have had a complex past with colonial masters, and that generally have weak administrative structures.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 38 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

194

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

African fintech companies looking to expand across the continent must consider the high levels of heterogeneity that exist within individual markets. In order to overcome considerable challenges and secure market share, it is critical to have a flexible approach to marketing and adjust strategies as necessary to reach targeted consumer groups.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2021

Luiz Eduardo Simão, Karine Somensi, Ricardo Villarroel Dávalos and Carlos Manuel Taboada Rodriguez

This work aims to measure the performance of an electric motors supply chain (SC) by using the Triple E performance measurement model to assess three performance…

Abstract

Purpose

This work aims to measure the performance of an electric motors supply chain (SC) by using the Triple E performance measurement model to assess three performance dimensions simultaneously: efficiency, efficacy and environmental impact.

Design/methodology/approach

This research presents a real case of a Brazilian company as an example for applying the Triple E performance measurement model and the discrete-event simulation to assess the performance of an SC.

Findings

Performance measurements for the three dimensions were the following: (1) for efficiency, a high inventory cost in the SC, driven by the distribution center (DC) (49.7% total cost); an order cycle time operating with an average of 21.7 days and a logistic channel transport capacity of 88%; (2) for efficacy, a service level of 98% for all channels; (3) for environmental impact, the SC emits a total of 395,733 kg of CO2 annually, with the DC and the regional distribution center (RDC2) being the largest emitters.

Originality/value

This work allowed to measure the performance of an SC interface (manufacturing process, a DC and three regional distribution centers). It was possible to measure the inventory holding cost and out-of-stock inventory costs, order cycle time, SC service level, transport capacity utilization and CO2 emissions in the transportation process of each SC stage and the whole SC. This study can be used as a decision support guide for academics and practitioners to measure and improve the SC performance.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 71 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Yaw A. Debrah and Ian G. Smith

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of…

10973

Abstract

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of globalization on work and employment in contemporary organizations. Covers the human resource management implications of organizational responses to globalization. Examines the theoretical, methodological, empirical and comparative issues pertaining to competitiveness and the management of human resources, the impact of organisational strategies and international production on the workplace, the organization of labour markets, human resource development, cultural change in organisations, trade union responses, and trans‐national corporations. Cites many case studies showing how globalization has brought a lot of opportunities together with much change both to the employee and the employer. Considers the threats to existing cultures, structures and systems.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2017

Abstract

Details

Brazil
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-785-4

1 – 10 of 15