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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Jasper van Loo, Andries de Grip and Margot de Steur

Until now there has been surprisingly little research on the causes of and the remedies for skills obsolescence. This study tries to fill that gap to some extent by…

Abstract

Until now there has been surprisingly little research on the causes of and the remedies for skills obsolescence. This study tries to fill that gap to some extent by analysing the relation between risk factors and skills obsolescence. Moreover, the role remedies play to counter skills obsolescence is analysed. Four empirical analyses that relate skills obsolescence to risk factors and remedies are presented. We find that most risk factors identified in the literature can be validated empirically. The remedies for skills obsolescence are not effective in all situations: the results show that there is considerable variation in the effectiveness of the remedies across different types of skills obsolescence. Although current available data do not allow a comprehensive analysis, which also takes account of relations between the various types of skills obsolescence, the results obtained are plausible and offer a starting point for further research.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 22 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2020

Lin-Yang Yue and Wei-de Huang

This paper aims to examine the J-shaped relationship between age and job-specific skill obsolescence (JSSO), and the differential moderating effects of development and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the J-shaped relationship between age and job-specific skill obsolescence (JSSO), and the differential moderating effects of development and maintenance HR practices on this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Regression models of survey data obtained from a sample of 722 Chinese knowledge workers were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that among women age and JSSO are J-shaped related and the relationship weakens under high development HR practices; while among men the J-shaped age-JSSO relation is significant only under low maintenance HR practices.

Research limitations/implications

This research is subject to the cross-sectional design, and the sample is restricted to knowledge workers.

Originality/value

This study advances previous studies that hold a linear (positive or negative) age-JSSO relationship by theorizing and testing a J-shaped one. The differentiated moderating effects of two bundles of HR practices proved improves our knowledge about how to use HR practices appropriately to sustain employee work competency in the context of workforce aging.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Emmanuel Apergis and Nicholas Apergis

This paper empirically explores the role of skill losses during unemployment behind firms' behaviour in interviewing long-term unemployed

Abstract

Purpose

This paper empirically explores the role of skill losses during unemployment behind firms' behaviour in interviewing long-term unemployed

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis makes use of the Work Employment Relations Survey in the UK, while it applies a panel probit modelling approach to estimate the empirical findings.

Findings

The findings document that skill losses during long-term unemployment reduce the likelihood of an interview, while they emphasize the need for certain policies that could compensate for this deterioration of skills. For robustness check, the estimation strategy survives the examination of the same predictors under different types of the working environment.

Originality/value

The original values of the work 1 combines for the first time both duration and technology as predictors of interview probability. Until now, the independent variables were used to test whether an individual has managed to exit unemployment, thus skipping the step of the interview process.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

The Aging Workforce Handbook
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-448-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Dennis G. Armstrong and Brian H. Kleiner

Examines key competences required in US places of work and describes how these can be most effectively taught in the workplace and not the classroom. It is more efficient…

Abstract

Examines key competences required in US places of work and describes how these can be most effectively taught in the workplace and not the classroom. It is more efficient to train staff in the workplace. Describes vocational training programmes set up at Northern Tube, Pacific First Federal and an apprenticeship programme at Siemens Stromberg‐Carlson. Concludes that if employees are given an opportunity to improve themselves, most will.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Dennis R. Herschbach

Presents an overview of school and classroom policies and practices which contribute to the improvement of the quality and efficiency of vocational education and training…

Abstract

Presents an overview of school and classroom policies and practices which contribute to the improvement of the quality and efficiency of vocational education and training (VET) in developing countries. Centres on a number of relevant factors identified by research on school and teacher effectiveness which relate to the improvement of programming and cost containment. Includes management and instructional practices, instructional organization, instructional resources, staff recruitment and training, and admission and placement policies, among others. Suggests that without acceptable levels of material and human resources, instructional quality cannot be maintained. However, resource requirements can be reduced through the more effective and efficient use of existing resources. Concludes that the chief way to improve instructional efficiency in VET is reduced training time.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Gian Carlo Cainarca and Francesca Sgobbi

The purpose of this paper is to estimate the incidence of educational mismatch in Italy and the return to investment in education, controlling for employees’ ability…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to estimate the incidence of educational mismatch in Italy and the return to investment in education, controlling for employees’ ability. Contrary to most existing studies, the heterogeneity of individual performance is measured directly through the assessment of required and provided skills.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on original data including over 3,600 face‐to‐face interviews, this paper appraises the incidence of self‐assessed educational mismatch in the Italian private sector and estimates wage models of the economic returns to educational mismatch, skill requirements and provided skills.

Findings

In Italy, under‐educated employees outnumber over‐educated ones and returns to required education and over‐education are lower than in other industrialised countries. Individual heterogeneous ability, as captured by individual skills, is a significant determinant of wage, although the inclusion of direct measures of required and provided skills does not substantially affect the estimated coefficients of the return to investment in education.

Practical implications

The omission of controls for the heterogeneous ability of employees biases the results of traditional ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates of wage models. However, the bias may be small enough to make simple OLS estimates on existing cross‐sectional data an acceptable compromise to provide policy makers with reasonably accurate and up‐to‐date information.

Originality/value

The paper provides a direct appreciation of individual heterogeneity that other studies can capture only through sophisticated indirect econometric techniques. In addition, the paper extends the set of available cross‐country comparisons by estimating the educational mismatch and the returns to educational and skill mismatches in the overall Italian private labour market.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2008

Marilyn Clarke and Margaret Patrickson

Changing career patterns and the erosion of job security have led to a growing emphasis on employability as a basis for career and employment success. The written and…

Abstract

Purpose

Changing career patterns and the erosion of job security have led to a growing emphasis on employability as a basis for career and employment success. The written and psychological contracts between employer and employer have become more transactional and less relational, and loyalty is no longer a guarantee of ongoing employment. Individuals are thus expected to take primary responsibility for their own employability rather than relying on the organisation to direct and maintain their careers. The purpose of this paper is to identify and examine the assumptions underpinning the concept of employability and evaluate the extent to which employability has been adopted as a new covenant in the employment relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a review of relevant literature the paper discusses current research on careers and employability and examines the available evidence regarding its adoption as a basis for contemporary employment relationships.

Findings

The paper finds that the transfer of responsibility for employability from organisation to individual has not been widespread. There is still an expectation that organisations will manage careers through job‐specific training and development. Employability has primarily benefited employees with highly developed or high‐demand skills. Employability is not a guarantee of finding suitable employment.

Practical implications

Employers can assist their employees by clarifying changes to the psychological contract, highlighting the benefits of career self‐management, and providing training and development in generic employability skills.

Originality/value

The paper questions underlying assumptions about employability and explores issues of relevance to human resource managers, policy‐makers, employers and employees.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Book part
Publication date: 18 September 2006

Lori Anderson Snyder, Deborah E. Rupp and George C. Thornton

The impetus for this paper was the recognition, based on recent surveys and our own experiences, that organizations face special challenges when designing and validating…

Abstract

The impetus for this paper was the recognition, based on recent surveys and our own experiences, that organizations face special challenges when designing and validating selection procedures for information technology (IT) workers. The history of the IT industry, the nature of IT work, and characteristics of IT workers converge to make the selection of IT workers uniquely challenging. In this paper, we identify these challenges and suggest means of addressing them. We show the advantages offered by the modern view of validation that endorses a wide spectrum of probative information relevant to establishing the job relatedness and business necessity of IT selection procedures. Finally, we identify the implications of these issues for industrial/organizational psychologists, human resource managers, and managers of IT workers.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-426-3

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Parisa Alizadeh and Reza Salami

The purpose of this paper is to describe the current status of the knowledge-based economy (KBE) in Iran in comparison to Turkey, the challenges encountered and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the current status of the knowledge-based economy (KBE) in Iran in comparison to Turkey, the challenges encountered and the appropriate policies toward Iran’s Outlook 2025 based on which the country is expected to be ranked first in science and technology within the Middle East region.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a descriptive research. The methodology used for this study is qualitative/quantitative secondary research. The method will be used for two main goals. First, we used the World Bank’s Knowledge Assessment Methodology, and the data are mostly collected from secondary sources such as the World Bank’s Development Indicators for Iran and Turkey. Second, desktop research will be used to summarize and synthesize available studies on the consideration of policy-making toward KBE, especially among developing economies.

Findings

The paper provides policy considerations around four pillars: information and communications technology (ICT), innovation system, education and human resources development and economic incentives and institutional regime. It suggests that regarding ICT indicators, Iran has to join international programs to attract senior public authorities’ involvement and accountability. Regarding its innovation system, lessons for policymakers are implementing development plans and coordinating science and technology policies in the country. Moreover, the quality of education, in-company training, post-secondary technical education and scientific and technological workforce need to be improved. Finally, considering the weak macroeconomic circumstances, legislative measures are needed in addition to, establishing a promotion agency for foreign direct investment to coordinate the inflow and to grant incentives for attracting more investment.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen research approach, the research results have not been confirmed by an experts group. Therefore, using some group decision-making methods, such as panel of experts, could be proposed to further test the findings.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for public policymakers, especially in developing countries, and for moving toward a KBE.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills an identified need to learn from similar countries experiences in policymaking about the same problem.

Details

Journal of Science & Technology Policy Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

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