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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2022

Jill Adler, Lisnet Mwadzaangati and Shikha Takker

The aim is the introduction of lesson study (LS) in geometry in Malawi secondary schools supported by a teaching framework that includes a focus on language responsive teaching.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim is the introduction of lesson study (LS) in geometry in Malawi secondary schools supported by a teaching framework that includes a focus on language responsive teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

The study reports an LS on geometry for professional development (PD) of secondary teachers. Data analysed includes lesson plans, transcripts of lessons, reflective discussions. The analytical approach is qualitative content analysis.

Findings

Teachers' lexicalisation of an exterior angle of a triangle evolved as a function of a teaching framework that guided their participation in planning, teaching and reflecting through LS cycle, and that was derived from networking between theories.

Research limitations/implications

This is both a small-scale study, and a limited content focus in the lesson, a function of LS being a new practice, and teachers simultaneously learning ideas about geometry teaching, those embedded in the framework and doing LS.

Practical implications

The paper includes a description of how LS might contribute to teachers' learning of language responsive teaching, and so is useful for others working on LS and language practices.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to learn more about how networking theories to inform and support LS can create learning opportunities for teachers, particularly about language responsive teaching, an interest and concern worldwide.

Details

International Journal for Lesson & Learning Studies, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Vasen Pillay and Jill Adler

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the methodology used by the authors to describe the enacted object of learning, a methodology where data production and analysis is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the methodology used by the authors to describe the enacted object of learning, a methodology where data production and analysis is rooted in a theorisation of pedagogy. The authors share how the authors used this methodological approach to provide a comprehensive description of the enacted object of learning and in so doing the authors hope to make a methodological contribution to the field of learning study. The lesson analysis foregrounds the importance of “evaluation” in pedagogic practice, and thus a key element of pedagogy. Tools from variation theory are incorporated into this broader approach that the authors suggest illuminates the enacted object of learning. The authors offer this approach as a methodological contribution to the development of research in and on learning study.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was adopted as the key research methodology in this study. The four teachers who participated in this study were purposively identified since in the first instance the design of the study warranted that the teachers who participated were teaching mathematics at grade 10. Second, the need to be purposive in the sampling strategy employed was based on issues around cost, logistics and convenience.

Findings

While learning study foregrounds the importance of examining the constitution of the enacted object of learning, the contention is that it is through a focus on evaluation that the authors are able to fully describe what is constituted as mathematics with respect to the enacted object of learning. Analysis of evaluation thus adds to the description of the enacted object in critical ways.

Originality/value

Within the domain of learning study, this paper provides a novel way of engaging with a lesson transcript in an attempt to fully describe what comes to be constituted as the enacted object of learning. This is achieved by combining the notion of evaluative events and authorisation on one hand and variation theory on the other.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2016

Brent Harger

This chapter examines the definitions of bullying used by students and adults in elementary schools and the effects that these definitions had within the broader school culture.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter examines the definitions of bullying used by students and adults in elementary schools and the effects that these definitions had within the broader school culture.

Design/methodology/approach

I combine interviews with 53 students and 10 adults and over 430 hours of participant observation with fifth grade students at two rural elementary schools.

Findings

Definitions of bullying held by those in these schools typically differed from those used by researchers. Even when individuals held definitions that were in line with those used by researchers, however, a focus on identifying bullies rather than on behaviors that fit definitions of bullying contributed to a school culture in which negative interactions were normalized and student reports of these behaviors were discouraged.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to two elementary schools in the rural Midwest and cannot be seen as representative of all schools. Support for my findings from other research combined with similar definitions and school cultures in both schools, however, suggest that these definitions and practices are part of a broader cultural context of bullying in the United States.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that schools might be better served by focusing less on labels like “bully” and more on particular behaviors that are to be taken seriously by students, teachers, staff members, and principals.

Originality/value

Although other researchers have studied definitions of bullying, none have combined these definitions with observational data on the broader school contexts in which those definitions are created and used.

Details

Education and Youth Today
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-046-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Jill Atkins and Warren Maroun

We are currently experiencing what is often called the sixth period of mass extinction on planet Earth, caused undoubtedly by the impact of human activities and businesses on…

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Abstract

Purpose

We are currently experiencing what is often called the sixth period of mass extinction on planet Earth, caused undoubtedly by the impact of human activities and businesses on nature. The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential for accounting and corporate accountability to contribute to extinction prevention. The paper adopts an interdisciplinary approach, weaving scientific evidence and theory into organisational disclosure and reporting in order to demonstrate linkages between extinction, business behaviour, accounting and accountability as well as to provide a basis for developing a framework for narrative disclosure on extinction prevention.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is theoretical and interdisciplinary in approach, seeking to bring together scientific theories of extinction with a need for corporate and organisational accountability whilst recognising philosophical concerns in the extant environmental accounting literature about accepting any business role and capitalist mechanisms in ecological matters. The overarching framework derives from the concept of emancipatory accounting.

Findings

The outcome of the writing is to: present an emancipatory “extinction accounting” framework which can be embedded within integrated reports, and a diagrammatic representation, in the form of an “ark”, of accounting and accountability mechanisms which, combined, can assist, the authors argue, in preventing extinction. The authors suggest that the emancipatory framework may also be applied to engagement meetings between the responsible investor community (and non-governmental organisations (NGOs)) and organisations on biodiversity and species protection.

Research limitations/implications

The exploratory extinction accounting and accountability frameworks within this paper should provide a basis for further research into the emancipatory potential for organisational disclosures and mechanisms of governance and accountability to prevent species extinction.

Practical implications

The next steps for researchers and practitioners involve development and implementation of the extinction accounting and engagement frameworks presented in this paper within integrated reporting and responsible investor practice.

Social implications

As outlined in this paper, extinction of any species of flora and fauna can affect significantly the functioning of local and global ecosystems, the destruction of which can have, and is having, severe and dangerous consequences for human life. Extinction prevention is critically important to the survival of the human race.

Originality/value

This paper represents a comprehensive attempt to explore the emancipatory role of accounting in extinction prevention and to bring together the linkages in accounting and accountability mechanisms which, working together, can prevent species extinction.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Jill Manthorpe, Jess Harris and Sam Mauger

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on UK older people’s forums. Forums seek to influence statutory responses to ageing, and enable older people to speak up on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on UK older people’s forums. Forums seek to influence statutory responses to ageing, and enable older people to speak up on matters important to them. The review examined three facets of forums: their membership, structures, and effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Methods included searching databases, internet, and specialist libraries for materials relating to older people’s forums. Key points were extracted and source material described but not subject to quality appraisal. Relevant non-UK studies are included to draw contrast and comparisons.

Findings

Several studies and reports have explored forum members’ socio-demographic profiles, motivations and triggers for joining and the two-way rewards of participation. However, membership remains a minority activity, with only a small percentage of members actively engaged and the review highlights gaps in the literature on widening participation. Both statutory and voluntary sectors have supported forum development and sustainability. There is little data on formal structures but some exploration of the informal communications and behaviours that sustain them has been undertaken. Forums are viewed as effective but resource intensive. The size and representativeness of the membership, strength of influence and deployment of members’ expertise are all identified as potential contributors to effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

Some material may not have been accessible and there is potential bias by greater inclusion of journal published materials than other possible sources. Material was not quality appraised, and research literature and self-reporting by forums are presented alongside each other.

Practical implications

Practitioners should familiarise themselves with current older people’s organisations locally to ensure that consultations are broad and reach different groups. While partnerships with voluntary sector health and care providers are encouraged some of these groups may not wish to represent all older people. Wider reach may provide multiple perspectives. Help in kind as well as financial resources may be welcomed by older people’s groups, such as meeting spaces, assistance with administration, and briefings that are accessible. Offering to meet with older people’s forums to discuss matters regularly may provide insight into experiences of services and changing needs earlier than professional feedback. Dismissing older people’s forums as made up of the “usual suspects” is likely to be unfair and unhelpful to building up positive relationships.

Originality/value

The review provides a preliminary assessment of the size and scope of research and grey literature on UK older people’s forums, synthesising points of similarity and difference and identifying clear gaps in the evidence.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Joseph A. Kotarba

Writing is one of the key features of the life and work of the symbolic interactionist. The foundation of good writing is the establishment of the self and identity of the…

Abstract

Writing is one of the key features of the life and work of the symbolic interactionist. The foundation of good writing is the establishment of the self and identity of the interactionist qua writer. The best writers are those who write constantly – not necessarily in formal text form but also in term of journals, note-taking, and so forth. Writing does not retrieve our ideas from our minds and memories; it creates them as retrievable gems of our work. My argument is that, as symbolic interactionists, we have the opportunity, if not responsibility, to position the drama of everyday life in our writing because our respondents experience their everyday lives dramatically.

Details

Radical Interactionism and Critiques of Contemporary Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-029-8

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 July 2023

Gennaro Maione, Corrado Cuccurullo and Aurelio Tommasetti

The paper aims to carry out a comprehensive literature mapping to synthesise and descriptively analyse the research trends of biodiversity accounting, providing implications for…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to carry out a comprehensive literature mapping to synthesise and descriptively analyse the research trends of biodiversity accounting, providing implications for managers and policymakers, whilst also outlining a future agenda for scholars.

Design/methodology/approach

A bibliometric analysis is carried out by adopting the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses protocol for searching and selecting the scientific contributions to be analysed. Citation analysis is used to map a current research front and a bibliographic coupling is conducted to detect the connection networks in current literature.

Findings

Biodiversity accounting is articulated in five thematic clusters (sub-areas), such as “Natural resource management”, “Biodiversity economic evaluation”, “Natural capital accounting”, “Biodiversity accountability” and “Biodiversity disclosure and reporting”. Critical insights emerge from the content analysis of these sub-areas.

Practical implications

The analysis of the thematic evolution of the biodiversity accounting literature provides useful insights to inform both practice and research and infer implications for managers, policymakers and scholars by outlining three main areas of intervention, i.e. adjusting evaluation tools, integrating ecological knowledge and establishing corporate social legitimacy.

Social implications

Currently, the level of biodiversity reporting is pitifully low. Therefore, organisations should properly manage biodiversity by integrating diverse and sometimes competing forms of knowledge for the stable and resilient flow of ecosystem services for future generations.

Originality/value

This paper not only updates and enriches the current state of the art but also identifies five thematic areas of the biodiversity accounting literature for theoretical and practical considerations.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Jill Kurp Maher, John B. Lord, Renée Shaw Hughner and Nancy M. Childs

This research investigates the changes in the types of advertised food products and the use of nutritional versus consumer appeals in children’s advertising from 2000 to 2005.

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Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates the changes in the types of advertised food products and the use of nutritional versus consumer appeals in children’s advertising from 2000 to 2005.

Design/methodology/approach

Content Analysis.

Findings

Results indicate that food processors and restaurants have not changed their advertising messages to children in response to the multitude of pressures the industry is facing. Specifically, this pre‐post longitudinal comparison shows no significant change regarding types of food products advertised and type of appeals used in the ads directed to children.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the sample studied. While the ads recorded all came from television programming aimed specifically at children, there was no specification or ability to classify the consumers according to the age of the viewer. Additionally, duplicate exposures of the ads were not included in the study.

Practical implications

Obesity is a serious and expanding concern for our children’s health. As past advertising research and socialization theory suggest, children’s exposure to advertising has impact. It is important to monitor changes in food advertising to children in the future to ascertain whether and to what extent food companies are able to change both what they advertise and the appeals they use to gain consumers’, in this case, children’s attention.

Originality/value

This study provides a useful baseline (prior to 2001) and benchmark (post 2001) to longitudinally examine the food product and appeal usage in food advertising directed to children. This will be useful information for advertisers, for parents, for regulators and for special interest groups, all of whom have a common goal – healthy kids.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Jill N. Peltzer and Cynthia S. Teel

This paper seeks to identify strategies that promote the development and sustainability of a successful comprehensive community health center located in a rural Mid‐western state.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to identify strategies that promote the development and sustainability of a successful comprehensive community health center located in a rural Mid‐western state.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a qualitative case study methodology, using a purposive sample of 15 employees and board members of a rural community health center. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted, transcribed, and analyzed for common themes and sub‐themes that would describe the strategies used to develop and sustain the successful center.

Findings

Leading with Consideration was identified as the dominant theme in the interviews, field notes and archival data. Four sub‐themes: Living the Mission, Fostering Individual Growth, Building a Community, and Encouraging Innovation, emerged from the narratives. Leadership was the most important theme that emerged from the data, resulting in a workforce culture that upholds the mission of the center, leadership that seeks to inspire the growth of both employees and clients. As a result, there is a sense of community and innovative health care endeavours that have created a sustainable holistic health care model.

Research limitations/implications

The themes that emerged from the narratives of the participants may not be transferable to other community health centers. The case selected for this study was located in a rural, primarily Caucasian setting, so the findings may not be transferable to urban or more racially diverse settings.

Practical implications

Transformational leadership may be an important concept for safety net clinics to promote a positive work environment that continually addresses the important mission of the organization, promotes retention of staff, and promotes staff to provide quality, continuity of care to clients to promote their health. Within current safety net organizations, the findings from this research may affirm leaders' servant leadership styles and how they positively impact their organization. Healthy work environments guided by transformational leaders promote retention of quality health care professionals, who in turn, provide quality care in medically underserved communities.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first qualitative studies to describe concepts that support the development of a successful, sustainable community health center.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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