Search results

1 – 9 of 9
Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Nele Cannaerts, Jesse Segers and Erik Henderickx

The purpose of this paper is to explore how public cultural organizations use ambidextrous design to balance exploitation and exploration given their organizational structure that…

1259

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how public cultural organizations use ambidextrous design to balance exploitation and exploration given their organizational structure that mainly stimulates exploitation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use an abductive methodology and, perform an in-depth comparative case study. The data sample consists of two Belgian public cultural centers located in the Flemish area. In all, 21 semi-structured interviews where analyzed using Nvivo.

Findings

Results show, first, that although both cases have the same formal organization chart, their informal structure differs. Second, both cases have a different point of view toward exploitation and exploration. Third, no “pure” ambidextrous designs were found. Finally, the paper formulates theoretical propositions for ambidexterity and public sector research.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this paper are threefold. First, the authors only compared two cases, so generalization of the findings is limited. Second, although the authors managed to make contributions to ambidexterity and public sector research, theory building is not finished. Finally, researchers have to improve empirical evidence focusing on which design elements lead toward ambidextrous public organizations.

Originality/value

This paper makes a threefold contribution to ambidexterity literature and public sector research. First, the focus on public sector organizations is a rarely taken approach in ambidexterity research. Second, the specific use of ambidextrous design attributes to the limited public sector research that has focused on ambidexterity. Third, the focus on small organizations with limited resources is a rarely taken focus in ambidexterity and public sector research.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2022

Danny Sandra, Jesse Segers and Robert Giacalone

To provide ways of how organizations can benefit from entrainment, the purpose of this paper is to create a better theoretically grounded understanding of entrainment in…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide ways of how organizations can benefit from entrainment, the purpose of this paper is to create a better theoretically grounded understanding of entrainment in organizations by reviewing the literature, describing managerial implications and identifying future research directions.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review of relevant literature based on peer-reviewed research papers published in highly ranked scientific journals.

Findings

It provides a clear understanding as to what constitutes entrainment in organizations and emphasizes its complexity. Further, six benefits of entrainment are highlighted, including the positive relationship between entrainment and organizational outcomes. The review may also provide entrepreneurs and practitioners a scientific basis for developing innovative tools to help managers’ foster entrainment in organizations.

Research limitations/implications

The review indicates that entrainment plays a much larger role in organizations than we think. Change leaders' actions may impact the emotions and actions of change recipients through entrainment. The selected keywords used in the search and the researcher's bias of including or excluding articles for this review are the major research limitations.

Originality/value

It is one of the first papers, to our knowledge, to provide a structured overview and understanding of the entrainment phenomenon in an organizational context, based on 41 peer-reviewed articles.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Ans De Vos and Jesse Segers

Career self‐directedness is a concept that has gained widespread attention in the literature on new careers and managerial thinking about contemporary career development. In a…

2137

Abstract

Purpose

Career self‐directedness is a concept that has gained widespread attention in the literature on new careers and managerial thinking about contemporary career development. In a related sense, the topic of employee retirement has become popular in both the academic and managerial literature. However, to date, career self‐directedness has not been studied in relationship with older workers' retirement intentions. The purpose of this study is to test a model of the relationship between career self‐directedness and retirement intentions, mediated by career self‐management behaviors and engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was completed by 271 employees older than 45 working in five organizations. The average age was 53, and 59 percent were female. Participants had been with their current employer for an average of 16 years, and 58 percent of them worked fulltime. The survey included measures of self‐directed career attitude, career self‐management behaviors, engagement and retirement intention.

Findings

Results indicate that engagement and career self‐management behaviors fully mediated the relationship between self‐directed career attitude and retirement intention.

Originality/value

This is the first study to address career self‐directedness in relationship with retirement intentions, thereby considering the mediating role of career self‐management behaviors and engagement. As a result, this study contributes to insights in the validity of career self‐directedness as a predictor of career development using a sample of employees different from the main body of studies using samples of employees in their early career stages. Moreover, it sheds further light on the retirement process by including an individual career attitude and intermediating variables viewed as important to understand contemporary organizational behavior.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Sofie Rogiest, Jesse Segers and Arjen van Witteloostuijn

Through the combination of change process, context and content the purpose of this paper is to provide a deeper understanding of failure or success of organizational change. This…

4748

Abstract

Purpose

Through the combination of change process, context and content the purpose of this paper is to provide a deeper understanding of failure or success of organizational change. This study considers the effect of organizational climate on affective commitment to change simultaneously with quality change communication and employee participation during the change process, while controlling for perceived change impact.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings are based on 134 survey responses gathered through surveys in two police forces that recently underwent a merger.

Findings

First, quality change communication is the only process variable that directly impacts affective commitment to change. Second, the results indicate that an involvement-oriented climate positively affects affective commitment to change, mediated through quality change communication.

Originality/value

First, the general understanding of the impact of climate on organizational change is very limited. Second, employee participation and quality change communication are generally studied together. The authors propose that both process variables each have their unique impact on attitudes toward change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Slawomir Jan Magala

441

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Arjen van Witteloostuijn

Current publication practices in the scholarly (International) Business and Management community are overwhelmingly anti-Popperian, which fundamentally frustrates the production…

2961

Abstract

Purpose

Current publication practices in the scholarly (International) Business and Management community are overwhelmingly anti-Popperian, which fundamentally frustrates the production of scientific progress. This is the result of at least five related biases: the verification, novelty, normal science, evidence, and market biases. As a result, no one is really interested in replicating anything. In this essay, the author extensively argues what he believes is wrong, why that is so, and what we might do about this. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an essay, combining a literature review with polemic argumentation.

Findings

Only a tiny fraction of published studies involve a replication effort. Moreover, journal authors, editors, reviewers and readers are not interested in seeing nulls and negatives in print. This replication crisis implies that Popper’s critical falsification principle is actually thrown into the scientific community’s dustbin. Behind the façade of all these so-called new discoveries, false positives abound, as do questionable research practices meant to produce all this allegedly cutting-edge and groundbreaking significant findings. If this dismal state of affairs does not change for the good, (International) Business and Management research is ending up in a deadlock.

Research limitations/implications

A radical cultural change in the scientific community, including (International) Business and Management, is badly needed. It should be in the community’s DNA to engage in the quest for the “truth” – nothing more, nothing less. Such a change must involve all stakeholders: scholars, editors, reviewers, and students, but also funding agencies, research institutes, university presidents, faculty deans, department chairs, journalists, policymakers, and publishers. In the words of Ioannidis (2012, p. 647): “Safeguarding scientific principles is not something to be done once and for all. It is a challenge that needs to be met successfully on a daily basis both by single scientists and the whole scientific establishment.”

Practical implications

Publication practices have to change radically. For instance, editorial policies should dispose of their current overly dominant pro-novelty and pro-positives biases, and explicitly encourage the publication of replication studies, including failed and unsuccessful ones that report null and negative findings.

Originality/value

This is an explicit plea to change the way the scientific research community operates, offering a series of concrete recommendations what to do before it is too late.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Sugumar Mariappanadar

The purpose of this paper is to develop a health harm of work scale from the sustainable HRM perspective.

1510

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a health harm of work scale from the sustainable HRM perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-dimensional model was proposed for the health harm of work scale and validated (Total n=527) using a five-part study (item generation, item reduction, convergent, construct and discriminant validity).

Findings

Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported that the three dimensions (restrictions for positive health, the risk factors for psychological health and the side effect harm of work) simultaneously tap into different aspects of the health harm of work construct. The results from the construct validity revealed that health harm of work as a phenomenon has manifested itself in different facets of health harm of work intensification. Finally, the discriminant validity study revealed that the overlap between the dimensions of the health harm of work scale and the dimensions of recovery experience from the work questionnaire is low and it provides support for the discriminant validity of dimensions between these two scales.

Practical implications

The proposed measure can be used as potential leading indicators for negative occupational health to prevent or delay the onset of work-related illness manifestation or health consequences (sick leave, absenteeism, presenteeism, etc.).

Originality/value

This is the first study to validate a measure of health harm of work and to provide tangible evidence of health harm of work which will subsequently trigger organizations to introduce a planned intervention to improve occupational well-being to promote sustainable HRM.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Hannah Zeilig

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to debates about the category “dementia”. Dementia is discussed, as it is a social, political and cultural issue, rather than a solely…

2076

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to debates about the category “dementia”. Dementia is discussed, as it is a social, political and cultural issue, rather than a solely medical phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology synthesises perspectives from humanities with the social sciences. Thus a number of cultural texts are analysed critically and set alongside data from two original research projects exploring the use of the arts for people living with a dementia. Central to the research is a close and critical examination of news reports, films, plays and documentaries that represent “dementia”. The extent to which metaphorical language frames ways of talking about dementia formed a key part of this analysis.

Findings

Until recently, “dementia” has been primarily defined in biomedical terms. This paper demonstrates that understandings of dementia should be extended to encompass social and cultural contexts.

Research limitations/implications

The research concentrates on the UK context, but there are lessons that can be extrapolated from to other contexts.

Social implications

This paper explores why it is important to understand “dementia” in terms of cultural context, the reasons we should challenge the language often used to describe people living with a dementia, the ways in which prevailing representations of people living with a dementia can affect perceptions and contribute to stigma.

Originality/value

This paper presents an alternative perspective, that is not biomedical and draws on original research from both the humanities and social sciences investigating the stories that we tell about this complex condition.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Funmilola Olubunmi Omotayo and Michael Chinweike Chigbundu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the adoption and use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) by school administrators in the management of schools, as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the adoption and use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) by school administrators in the management of schools, as well as factors that influence use of ICTs by the administrators.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey research design was adopted. A two-stage sampling procedure (random and purposive) was used to select the respondents, while quantitative and qualitative methods were used for data collection.

Findings

Findings reveal that the school administrators use various ICTs to carry out administrative and management duties. Task characteristics, task-technology fit, attitude and perceived ease of use have significant relationships with use of ICTs by the administrators.

Research limitations/implications

The findings and conclusion from this paper cannot be generalised to all schools in Nigeria because the population was limited to only private secondary schools.

Practical implications

The study contributes to an existing knowledge on adoption and use of ICTs in schools, and provides information to policymakers on factors that should be given consideration when there is a need to implement ICTs in schools.

Social implications

This paper could assist school administrators that are yet to adopt and implement ICTs in their schools of the need to do so in order to enjoy the benefits associated with ICTs use in the workplace.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first pieces of empirical research that has adopted the integrated technology acceptance and task-technology fit models to investigate use of ICTs by administrators of schools in Nigeria.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 19 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

1 – 9 of 9