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Abstract

Details

Inquiring into Academic Timescapes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-911-4

Abstract

Details

Rhythmanalysis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-973-1

Abstract

Details

Inquiring into Academic Timescapes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-911-4

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2021

Louise Nash

This chapter is concerned with the relationship between gender performativity and rhythm, taking the City of London (often known by its metonym the Square Mile) as the…

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with the relationship between gender performativity and rhythm, taking the City of London (often known by its metonym the Square Mile) as the focus for the empirical research and extending a Lefebvrian understanding of urban space and time via the practice of rhythmanalysis. It is concerned with how the City of London is imagined, constructed and experienced in and through gender performativity which can be expressed rhythmically (Reid-Musson, 2018). The research is based on fieldwork including photographic and interview data, as well as an embodied, immersive methodology used to analyse rhythms, showing how this can help to both sense and make sense of organisational place, particularly in terms of how such places can compel feelings of belonging or non-belonging. The chapter looks beyond the spatial configuration of a single organisation to encompass the wider geographical location of multiple organisations, in this case the City.

The findings show that the relationship between the socio-cultural and material aspects of the City can be understood through the rhythms of place. Using a methodological approach based on Lefebvre's Rhythmanalysis (2004), the chapter foregrounds a subjective, embodied and experiential way of researching the places and spaces of organising, and shows how gendered inclusion and exclusion can be expressed spatially and rhythmically.

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2021

Gordon Walker

In rhythmanalysis, energy is positioned centre stage in defining what rhythm is and how it manifests: everywhere where there is interaction between a place, a time and an

Abstract

In rhythmanalysis, energy is positioned centre stage in defining what rhythm is and how it manifests: everywhere where there is interaction between a place, a time and an expenditure of energy there is rhythm (Lefebvre, 1992/2004, p. 15). However, there is no further explication and little engagement in subsequent scholarship. I discuss this absence and propose a thermodynamic, materialist understanding of the energy in rhythm, linking to Lefebvre's interest in physics-thinking, and to his and Régulier's commitment to a multi-disciplinary rhythmanalytic project. I consider the polyrhythmic interweaving of energy flows in everyday life and the relationship between the techno-energy of energy systems, and the ‘natural’ energetic exchanges of planetary movements, ecological processes and organism functioning, including human bodies. I outline how an energetically oriented, multi-disciplinary rhythmanalysis can be applied to the climate crisis, to its arrhythmic consequences as well as to its making and mitigation in the rhythms of society and economy. I then focus on the rhythm energies of urban life and the challenges of transitioning urban mobility away from the domination of hydrocarbon-powered automobility systems. The polyrhythmic structure of urban automobility is characterised, encompassing rhythms of fuel supply, fuelling, vehicle movement and pollution generation. The rhythm-energetic shifts involved in moving to shared public transport, electric rather than hydrocarbon powered vehicles and to the corporeal, calorie-fuelled rhythms of walking and cycling are laid out, considering what they change, what they retain and what they add to the polyrhythmia of urban mobility.

Details

Rhythmanalysis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-973-1

Keywords

Abstract

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Progress in Psychobiology and Physiological Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12-542118-8

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2021

Katherine Stansfeld

This chapter develops Lefebvre’s concept of rhythmanalysis to investigate the ways super-diversity comes to life in the everyday city through the intersection of the…

Abstract

This chapter develops Lefebvre’s concept of rhythmanalysis to investigate the ways super-diversity comes to life in the everyday city through the intersection of the spatial and temporal. The chapter explores the multicultural intimacies of streets in a London neighbourhood through a close ethnographic focus on rhythms and atmospheres using slow-motion video. The research contributes to an emerging field of visual ethnographic scholarship by presenting slow-motion video as a method to explore the ‘presence’ (Lefebvre, 2004) of super-diversity and conviviality on the street.

I argue that in slowing down the encounters of the street, slow-motion video shows the often overlooked sensible and affective elements of super-diverse urban space, the mundane interactions between bodies, materials and technologies that create a form of ‘convivial affect’. I argue that these everyday encounters are shaped by a situated politics of difference and yet are also mediated by wider rhythms and atmospheres, contributing to a sense of ‘social time’. I draw attention to both the human and non-human elements of the streets. These material and technological elements can uncover the wider discourses and circulatory regimes of atmospheres in urban super-diverse neighbourhoods, focussing on their relation to broader flows of capital, forms of postcolonial culture and translocality.

This research has implications for how we understand super-diversity and its manifestations in urban space. It encourages policymakers and academics to recognise the affective human and non-human encounters that are a crucial aspect of conviviality, the everyday ways we live together with difference.

Abstract

Details

The Lived Experience of Work and City Rhythms: A Rhythmanalysis of London's Square Mile
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-759-4

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Torbjørn H. Netland, Jason D. Schloetzer and Kasra Ferdows

Why some assembly factories implement a lean program faster than others is an enduring puzzle. We examine the effect of a fundamental characteristic of every assembly…

Abstract

Purpose

Why some assembly factories implement a lean program faster than others is an enduring puzzle. We examine the effect of a fundamental characteristic of every assembly factory—its rhythm of production.

Design/methodology/approach

We designed a multi-method study and collected data from a leading global equipment manufacturer that launched a lean program across its factory network. We use quantitative data gathered from internal company documents to test our hypothesis that production rhythm affects the pace of lean implementation. We then analyze qualitative data from interviews and factory visits to derive theoretical explanations for how production rhythm affects lean implementation.

Findings

Consistent with our hypothesis, we present evidence that factories with faster production rhythms implement lean faster than those with slower rhythms. This evidence is consistent with learning theories as well as the literature on organizational routines and forms of knowledge. We propose a theory of the relation between rhythm and learning in lean implementation.

Research limitations/implications

The hitherto unexplored relation between production rhythm and lean implementation raises intriguing questions for scholars and ushers new insights into how organizations learn to implement lean.

Practical implications

Organizations need to calibrate their expectations for lean implementation pace when their factories have widely different production rhythms and find ways to mitigate any adverse effects slower rhythms may have. Organizations can alleviate the unfavorable context of slower rhythms by inculcating practices in the factory that emulate the learning environment present in faster-paced factories.

Originality/value

We contribute novel quantitative and qualitative evidence that production rhythm affects lean implementation through learning-based mechanisms.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Gabrielle Durepos, Terrance Weatherbee and Albert J. Mills

This paper features a critique of the treatment of time in modern and postmodern historical organization studies. The authors reply to the critique by drawing on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper features a critique of the treatment of time in modern and postmodern historical organization studies. The authors reply to the critique by drawing on Lefebvre’s notion of rhythm to theorize time in an amodern condition. The purpose of this study is to call on historical organization studies scholars to theoretically engage with time.

Design/methodology/approach

After a pointed literature review of the treatment of time in modern and postmodern historical organization studies, an ANTi-History approach to time is developed through an exploration of how rhythm can inform key ANTi-History facets.

Findings

New insights on key ANTi-History facets are developed in relation to time. These include seeing the past as history through rhythmic actor-networks, a description of relationalism informed by situated rhythms, a suggestion that the performative aspect of history is rhythmic and an illustration of what one might see if they watched an amodern historian at work.

Originality/value

Lefebvre’s concept of rhythm has been largely neglected in historiography and historical organization studies. Rhythm offers a way to understand time in relation to situated actor practices as opposed to the universal clock or chronological time.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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