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1 – 10 of over 10000
Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Mohamed Atef Elhamy Kamel

It is noted that cities in the region of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) have a very poor Walkability Index. It is typically the forgotten mode of transport. Moreover…

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Abstract

Purpose

It is noted that cities in the region of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) have a very poor Walkability Index. It is typically the forgotten mode of transport. Moreover, walking has become impossible. This is not just due to the scorching weather conditions but also due to the excessive dependence of the residents on the private automobile. The purpose of this paper is to explore walkability urban problems and to propose smart urban solutions so as to encourage walking in GCC cities.

Design/methodology/approach

This present paper defines walkability and portrays its advantages and benefits. It adapts the criteria of walkability to meet GCC cities’ planning needs. Furthermore, it analyzes Masdar City in Abu Dhabi as an example of encouraging walkability using smart solutions. The pilot case study for this present paper, King Abdullah national park in Dammam, Saudi Arabia, will be the application pool of those criteria. However, a questionnaire has been formulated in order to solicit some facts about attaining pedestrian comfort in that park.

Findings

The paper provides various smart urban solutions so as to encourage walkability in GCC cities.

Originality/value

Through presenting an overview of walkability in GCC cities and suggesting smart urban solutions, an additional study would be required to encourage walkability in other environments using various intelligent urban features.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Katia Passerini and Dezhi Wu

This paper presents best practices of global and local initiatives for social and economic capital development. It introduces the notion of “megacommunities” representing

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents best practices of global and local initiatives for social and economic capital development. It introduces the notion of “megacommunities” representing broad multilateral stakeholder groups that work together for the resolutions of large‐scale health, environmental and social problems. The paper also takes a more local view by discussing a few regional and municipal examples of “intelligent communities” at the forefront of the knowledge economy. These mega and intelligent communities are often the first to adopt information and communication technologies (ICT), especially pervasive broadband technologies services, for achieving superior social, human and economic wellbeing. The objective of the paper is to identify common drivers and characteristics of these communities and how they utilize ICT to promote higher‐level growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a general review. The paper introduces the notions of wellbeing, human, social and economic capital. It presents examples of mega and intelligent communities that represent the best practices in the achievement of wellbeing.

Findings

The review finds that technological empowerment – in particular information and communication technologies (ICT) – is fundamental to integrate mega and intelligent communities for social, human and economic wellbeing. Through the best practice examples presented in this research, ICT is regarded as the key driver for supporting a sustainable economic development at the global, regional and local levels. Through ICT, it is viable (and essential) to establish a global knowledge base, shared and contributed to by a variety of experts and professionals throughout the world in different fields.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents examples based on case studies conducted by the authors and based on reviews of the best practice approaches. Based upon the observation of the key success factors and commonalities among the cases, ICT plays an essential role for the sustainable outcomes from the current mega and intelligent community initiatives. Further empirical testing is needed to demonstrate the success factor relationships introduced in this paper.

Practical implications

The paper raises awareness of relevant initiatives that could be adopted and replicated to facilitate sustainable development.

Originality/value

The value of the paper stems from the link between the macro and micro dimensions of different communities. Using the best practice cases as examples, this paper presents worthy lessons to policy makers, governments, global knowledge management, other practitioners and professionals. In particular, it opens up potential opportunities for more effective and efficient global collaborations through highlighting the role of information and communication technologies in the successful management of community practices.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Adriana Zait

The purpose of this paper was to identify the main necessary competences for smart cities’ development. From their inception until now, smart cities are striving to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to identify the main necessary competences for smart cities’ development. From their inception until now, smart cities are striving to clarify their identity and become better, and thus, smarter. The whole process is in many ways similar to the journey of a child in his quest of growing into a smart adult, with the help of parents and support from educators. But it is not easy to tell how we, as citizens, through civic, educational and governance structures, raise smart cities. What competences do we need? This was the main question for the present essay, generated from several theoretical and practical experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, literature analysis, synthesis and theoretical inferences, for the smart city problematiques, and induction and exploratory qualitative analysis, for soft, civilizational competences, were used.

Findings

The main conclusion is that the literature still associates the smart city especially with its hard dimension, the highly developed and intelligent technologies, including information and communication technologies (ICTs), despite a growing number of studies dedicated to the soft, human and social capital component. The intangible, soft component – the human actor – plays an equally, if not even more important role, through mechanisms affecting all classical dimensions of smart cities (smart economy, people, governance, mobility, environment, living). Civilizational competences, soft skills or human-related characteristics of cities strongly influenced by culture (at national, regional, organizational and individual levels) are crucial for the development of smart and competitive cities. Civilizational competences are grouped into four categories: enterprise culture, discoursive culture, civic culture and daily culture. If we want to make our cities smart, we need to develop these competences – first define them, then identify their antecedents or influence factors and measure them.

Research limitations/implications

The study has several limits. First, the exploratory nature in itself, with many inductive and abductive suppositions that will need further testing. Second, the literature selection has a certain degree of subjectivity owing to the fact that besides the common, classical theory of smart cities, the authors were particularly interested in rather heterodox opinions about the subject, which lead them to the inclusion of singular or isolated points of view on narrower issues.

Practical implications

The findings of this exploratory conceptual essay could be used for further testing of hypotheses on the relationship between civilizational competences and smart cities’ development.

Social implications

Local and regional administrations could use the results to increase civil society’s involvement in the development of smart cities.

Originality/value

The study points out some new connections and relations for the smart city problematiques, and explicitly suggests relating the development of smart cities to the development of civilizational competences, as a complex category of factors going beyond the unique dimension of “people” or “human and social capital” from the smart cities literature. It is an exploratory outcome, generating new research hypotheses for the relationships between smart city development and culture-related factors grouped under the “cities” civilizational competences’ label.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 November 2020

Ning Li, Parthasarathy R. and Harshila H. Padwal

Smart mobility is a major guideline in the development of Smart Cities’ transport systems and management. The issue of transition into green, secure and sustainable…

Abstract

Purpose

Smart mobility is a major guideline in the development of Smart Cities’ transport systems and management. The issue of transition into green, secure and sustainable transport modes, such as using bicycles, should be implemented in this case, along with the subjectivism of management.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed technology reflects the Smart Bicycle vehicle model, which tracks cyclists and weather conditions and turns to electric motors in critical circumstances.

Findings

This reduces the physical load and battery consumption of cyclists which affects the Smart Cities’ ecology positively.

Originality/value

In Smart Vehicle Bicycle Communication Transport, the vehicle movement optimization technique is used for traffic scenarios to analyze traffic signaling systems that give better results in variable and dense traffic conditions.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 38 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 April 2022

Ayodeji Emmanuel Oke, Seyi Segun Stephen, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa, Deji Rufus Ogunsemi and Isaac Olaniyi Aje

The theories and models of smart city make up the systemic approach that governs its readiness. This contains the in depth analysis of the concepts of the smart city as it…

Abstract

The theories and models of smart city make up the systemic approach that governs its readiness. This contains the in depth analysis of the concepts of the smart city as it relates to the environment as wells as the energy present. Several theories are modelled into the smart city system to guide its implementation and consideration among the construction professionals in the constitution industry. Subsequently, frameworks are not neglected in terms of their relationship between the outcome of the theories and models propounded and conceptual integration in human, technology and institution. Inferences are made from these theories and models, and thus decision-making are dependent on the visibility envisaged.

Details

Smart Cities: A Panacea for Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-455-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Liang Chen, Prathik Anandhan and Balamurugan S.

In this paper, an intelligent information assisted communication transportation framework (II-CTF) has been introduced to reduce congestion, data reliability in…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, an intelligent information assisted communication transportation framework (II-CTF) has been introduced to reduce congestion, data reliability in transportation and the environmental effects.

Design/methodology/approach

The main concern of II-CTF is to mitigate public congestion using current transport services, which helps to improve data reliability under hazardous circumstances and to avoid accidents when the driver cannot respond reasonably. The program uses machine learning assistance to predict optimal routes based on movement patterns and categorization of vehicles, which helps to minimize congestion of traffic.

Findings

In II-CTF, scheduling traffic optimization helps to reduce the energy and many challenges faced by traffic managers in terms of optimization of the route, average waiting time and congestion of traffic, travel, and environmental impact due to heavy traffic collision.

Originality/value

The II-CTF definition is supposed to attempt to overcome some of the problems of the transportation environment that pose difficulties and make the carriage simpler, safer, more efficient and green for all.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 38 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 December 2017

Margarita Angelidou, Artemis Psaltoglou, Nicos Komninos, Christina Kakderi, Panagiotis Tsarchopoulos and Anastasia Panori

This paper investigates the potential contribution of smart city approaches and tools to sustainable urban development in the environment domain. Recent research has…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the potential contribution of smart city approaches and tools to sustainable urban development in the environment domain. Recent research has highlighted the need to explore the relation of smart and sustainable cities more systematically, focusing on practical applications that could enable a deeper understanding of the included domains, typologies and design concepts, and this paper aims to address this research gap. At the same time, it tries to identify whether these applications could contribute to the “zero vision” strategy, an extremely ambitious challenge within the field of smart cities.

Design/methodology/approach

This objective is pursued through an in-depth investigation of available open source and proprietary smart city applications related to environmental sustainability in urban environments. A total of 32 applications were detected through the Intelligent/Smart Cities Open Source (ICOS) community, a meta-repository for smart cities solutions. The applications are analyzed comparatively regarding (i) the environmental issue addressed, (ii) the associated mitigation strategies, (iii) the included innovation mechanism, (iv) the role of information and communication technologies and (v) the overall outcome.

Findings

The findings suggest that the smart and sustainable city landscape is extremely fragmented both on the policy and the technical levels. There is a host of unexplored opportunities toward smart sustainable development, many of which are still unknown. Similar findings are reached for all categories of environmental challenges in cities. Research limitations pertain to the analysis of a relatively small number of applications. The results can be used to inform policy making toward becoming more proactive and impactful both locally and globally. Given that smart city application market niches are also identified, they are also of special interest to developers, user communities and digital entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

The value added by this paper is two-fold. At the theoretical level, it offers a neat conceptual bridge between smart and sustainable cities debate. At the practical level, it identifies under-researched and under-exploited fields of smart city applications that could be opportunities to attain the “zero vision” objective.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2022

Chigozie Collins Okafor, Clinton Aigbavboa and Wellington Didibhuku Thwala

This study aims to promote the idea that social equity is a significant objective that needs to be achieved to attain a smart city and further reveal the current research…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to promote the idea that social equity is a significant objective that needs to be achieved to attain a smart city and further reveal the current research focus of smart city in relation to social equity. Also, it will propose determinants of social equity for smart city development.

Design/methodology/approach

The first part of this study was conducted by reviewing ten existing smart city models and assessing their elements, in a bid to find a relationship between the existing smart city models and social equity. These models were sorts from scholarly publications such as books, journals and other related articles sourced from google scholar and Scopus database. To give more credence to this study, a second aspect of this study was necessary; this was conducted using a bibliometric approach, and the data was gathered from the Scopus database. Keywords such as “smart-city” OR “Digital-city” OR “Intelligent-city” OR “Computer-city” OR “Technology-city” AND “Social-equity” were used for article extraction. VOSview was used to analyse the bibliographic data obtained.

Findings

This research revealed that studies that relate, link or discuss the idea that social equity is a significant objective that needs to be achieved to attain a smart city are low considering that only 48 articles were extracted, and most of the studies did not specifically focus on social equity in smart city development. Further findings revealed that the ten reviewed smart city models never linked or discussed the idea of social equity in smart city development. Additionally, this study revealed that emerging countries aiming to develop smart cities, particularly in Africa, are not paying much attention to the importance of creating social equity policies to attain smart cities.

Practical implications

This study revealed a knowledge gap in the study of smart cities in developing countries. Governments of various developing countries can implement the ideas from this study by creating and applying social equity policies to drive sustainable development, which will positively influence smart city attainment.

Originality/value

The contribution of this study is that it promotes the idea that social equity is a significant objective that needs to be achieved to attain smart cities. This study’s further originality and value lie in adopting a bibliometric approach of analysis that has not been used in this form in previous studies.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2021

Mahfooz Alam and Mohd Ibrahim Siddiqui

With the advancement in technology, the day-to-day life of people has gone through an immense transformation. The use of smart devices for day-to-day life is greater than…

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Abstract

Purpose

With the advancement in technology, the day-to-day life of people has gone through an immense transformation. The use of smart devices for day-to-day life is greater than before, and people are moving towards smart work rather than doing hard work. In this paper, a novel framework is proposed named Online Service Provider in Metro City (OSPMC) for IoT. The purpose of this study is to provide a theoretical framework for the E-Government in order to sustain or minimize the unemployment rate.

Design/methodology/approach

The utilization of the Web in the upcoming years would create further opportunities for smart work. Internet of Things (IoT) plays an essential part in a system of multiple networks that aims to connect all things in the world that are capable of being connected through the internet. OSPMC framework can be developed on ASP.NET through (visual C#) 3.0 and Microsoft SQL Server with frontend and backend languages, respectively, under a web-based environment built on .Net platform. This lucrative facility is available mainly for the people living in the smart city.

Findings

Rural people are coming to smart cities in search of jobs, better education and a healthy lifestyle. India is also coping up with the modern world. The Government of India has taken an initiative for the making of 100 smart cities where the residents are relied upon to use Information and Communication Technology with the assistance of web.

Social implications

OSPMC promises to eliminate multiple evils like social injustice, crime, unemployment, tax fraud and would promote women empowerment. Also, provide opportunities to start-ups in order to grow and enhance their skill work.

Originality/value

The objective of OSPMC can be found useful for opening new job opportunities for urban/rural people while also encouraging people to learn skill work. For smart cities’ success in developing nations, it is important to recognize the elements influencing it. The motivation behind OSPMC is to identify those variables influencing the successful usage of allowing IoT in the smart cities by E-Government of India and to use IoT to help urban smart cities.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Danielle Warnecke, Rikka Wittstock and Frank Teuteberg

Benchmarks provide a strategic tool for assessing the sustainability impacts of urban development. Addressing the need for practitioners to evaluate their initiatives…

Abstract

Purpose

Benchmarks provide a strategic tool for assessing the sustainability impacts of urban development. Addressing the need for practitioners to evaluate their initiatives, track progress and determine their competitive position, this paper aims to introduce the conception and implementation of a smart city maturity assessment and benchmarking tool.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a design science approach, application objectives are defined based on a review of literature and related benchmarking tools. Focusing on a subset of functions for the prototype version, these objectives are operationalized by development of a smart mobility maturity model, indicator set and survey. A two-step evaluation by means of a test run using data of five cities and expert interviews confirms the tool’s functionality.

Findings

Compliance with the defined objectives is achieved by implementation of a Web-based self-assessment tool using objective indicators. Future development iterations are to integrate additional smart city action fields.

Practical implications

Delivering a city’s maturity level, the tool enables stakeholders to measure the impact of their initiatives. Benchmarking functions for tracking progress and comparison with other projects are provided in the form of graphical analyses. Ac-tionable guidance is supplied for improving the city’s standing.

Social implications

Strategies supporting a sustainable lifestyle are crucial for smart city development, as the shaping of attractive living spaces and a reliable information and communication technology and physical infrastructure form major selling points for attracting skilled workers, businesses, tourists and citizens.

Originality/value

Enabling practitioners to self-evaluate their initiatives, providing the option to track progress and supplying guidance for improving a city’ standing, the proposed solution represents a novel form of knowledge transfer.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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