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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2014

Kirstin Steele

– The purpose of the article is to review possible new technologies which might enhance a Center for Digital Learning, Teaching and Scholarship at the library.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the article is to review possible new technologies which might enhance a Center for Digital Learning, Teaching and Scholarship at the library.

Design/methodology/approach

Opinion piece.

Findings

There are several cutting edge but increasingly affordable technologies which could attract students to the library and raise the library’s profile.

Research limitations/implications

It would be interesting to design a study of library use and determine if the addition of unusual technologies had any effects.

Practical implications

Given the affordability of some devices, there is little risk involved in proceeding with establishment and furnishing of a Center for Digital Learning, Teaching and Scholarship at the library.

Originality/value

A literature search for drones and libraries retrieved no scholarly articles, but did bring back one or two news pieces about circulating drones at the University of South Florida.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1964

TO say that the Twenty‐fourth S.B.A.C. Show was an unqualified success is perhaps to gild the lily. True there were disappointments— the delay which kept the TSR‐2 on the…

Abstract

TO say that the Twenty‐fourth S.B.A.C. Show was an unqualified success is perhaps to gild the lily. True there were disappointments— the delay which kept the TSR‐2 on the ground until well after the Show being one—but on the whole the British industry was well pleased with Farnborough week and if future sales could be related to the number of visitors then the order books would be full for many years to come. The total attendance at the Show was well over 400,000—this figure including just under 300,000 members of the public who paid to enter on the last three days of the Show. Those who argued in favour of allowing a two‐year interval between the 1962 Show and this one seem to be fully vindicated, for these attendance figures are an all‐time record. This augurs well for the future for it would appear that potential customers from overseas are still anxious to attend the Farnborough Show, while the public attendance figures indicate that Britain is still air‐minded to a very healthy degree. It is difficult to pick out any one feature or even one aircraft as being really outstanding at Farnborough, but certainly the range of rear‐engined civil jets (HS. 125, BAC One‐Eleven, Trident and VCIQ) served as a re‐minder that British aeronautical engineering prowess is without parallel, while the number of rotorcraft to be seen in the flying display empha‐sized the growing importance of the helicopter in both civil and military operations. As far as the value of Farnborough is concerned, it is certainly a most useful shop window for British aerospace products, and if few new orders are actually received at Farnborough, a very large number are announced— as our ’Orders and Contracts' column on page 332 bears witness. It is not possible to cover every exhibit displayed at the Farnborough Show but the following report describes a wide cross‐section beginning with the exhibits of the major airframe and engine companies.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1970

Accles & Pollock Ltd. of Oldbury, Worcestershire, a TI Steel Tube Division company, will be exhibiting a comprehensive range of precision steel tube and tubular products…

Abstract

Accles & Pollock Ltd. of Oldbury, Worcestershire, a TI Steel Tube Division company, will be exhibiting a comprehensive range of precision steel tube and tubular products, including plain, annularly convoluted and thin wall tube, at Farnborough.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 42 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1962

AS anticipated, the 1962 Society of British Aircraft Constructors' Flying Display and Exhibition at Farnborough was the biggest and most interesting for many years. In…

Abstract

AS anticipated, the 1962 Society of British Aircraft Constructors' Flying Display and Exhibition at Farnborough was the biggest and most interesting for many years. In all, seven new aircraft showed their paces at the Show for the first time; ranging from the spritely antics of the Beagle Wallis autogyro to the majestic pro‐gress of the giant VCIO. Of the other new air‐craft; the Beagle M.218, the de Havilland Trident (actually three of them flew over), the Bristol T. 188, the de Havilland DH 125 and the two Hawker P.1127's; it was the P.l127 vertical take‐off fighter which provided the highlight of the Show. The versatility of its performance was little short of astonishing and it is possible to foresee a revolution in aircraft design stemming from the wide‐spread adoption of vectored thrust and/or separate lifting engines.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 34 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1966

THE Farnborough 1966 Show was at first glance much the same mixture as before, but the second glance was the more revealing. The participation in the flying display of…

Abstract

THE Farnborough 1966 Show was at first glance much the same mixture as before, but the second glance was the more revealing. The participation in the flying display of European aircraft by no means swamped the air, even if the Italian verve took the acrobatic honours, but the theme of collaboration with other countries was to be found on practically every stand inside the exhibition tent. It was obvious that the smaller firms not directly involved in production agreements with other nations were very export conscious. The pacemaker of all this collaboration was of course the Concorde, only to be seen in model form, but rapidly taking shape at Toulouse and Filton, and many of the equipment manufacturers had Concorde hardware on display. Beagle announced the Pup, Britten‐Norman produced the production Islander, and Handley Page showed the Jetstream mock‐up. After many years of neglect, the industry is now taking an interest in the general aviation market. The P.1127 (R.A.F.) made its first appearance. The paradox of the P.1127 is that it is almost a part of Farnborough history, yet there is no other V/S.T.O.L. aircraft in the world that has but a fraction of the operating experience it has gained. Farnborough this year gave the impression of being more a serious trade show, and less a public spectacle. Sir Richard Smeeton, Director of the Society of British Aerospace Companies, reported that the exhibiting firms had received more serious business enquiries this year than ever before, and he forecast that 1968 would be a vintage year, which would see the appearance of the HS.801, the Concorde and Jaguar in the Farnborough skies. It is not possible to cover every exhibit shown at the Farnborough Show, but the following report describes a wide cross‐section beginning with the exhibits of the major airframe and engine companies.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 38 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1962

A.F. Newell and D. Howe

MUCH has been written about possible developments in the next decade, but any forecasting must of necessity be conjectural. As far as the next generation of military…

Abstract

MUCH has been written about possible developments in the next decade, but any forecasting must of necessity be conjectural. As far as the next generation of military aircraft is concerned the situation is very obscure, except for the fact that it is known that fewer types will be required. Developments in the civil field are rather easier to foresee, these being based on the anticipated travelling habits of the world's population.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1968

NOT perhaps the most vintage of Farnboroughs from the point of view of new aircraft and new technology, but undoubtedly one of the most successful in relation to the…

Abstract

NOT perhaps the most vintage of Farnboroughs from the point of view of new aircraft and new technology, but undoubtedly one of the most successful in relation to the business done. Some fifteen major orders worth over £32½ million were announced, bringing the total order book for the industry this year to more than £782 million already. This exceeds by a handsome margin the new business won by the industry in any nine‐month period in the past, and it is expected that by the end of the year orders worth well over £800 million will have been received. Highlights of the new British hardware on show were the Hawker Siddeley Nimrod and production Harriers on the military side; the B.A.C. One‐Eleven 500, the Handley Page Jetstream, the Garrett‐engined Short Skyvan, and the Beagle Pups showed the resurgence of the industry's civil interests. The number of foreign aircraft that appeared, sponsored in the main by Rolls‐Royce, bore witness to the strength of Britain's aero engine and aircraft equipment industry, and further evidence of this was found in the exhibition proper with many examples of major items of equipment having been adopted for overseas markets. The overall impression at Farnborough was a new‐found confidence in the future of the industry exemplified by a more aggressive and effective export sales policy that has already proved our ability to deliver the goods. It is not possible to cover all the exhibits shown at Farnborough, but the report following describes many of the interesting items.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 40 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1988

THORN EMI will be showing its new easy to use, extended warranty multi‐channel laboratory data recorder, the Multiband Data Recorder series (MDR), to be unveiled to users…

Abstract

THORN EMI will be showing its new easy to use, extended warranty multi‐channel laboratory data recorder, the Multiband Data Recorder series (MDR), to be unveiled to users for the first time at Farnborough (Stand 3A7).

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 60 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Leo Appleton, Valerie Stevenson and Debbi Boden

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the reasons and drivers for academic libraries affecting university strategy with regards to shaping and developing learning spaces…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the reasons and drivers for academic libraries affecting university strategy with regards to shaping and developing learning spaces in response to changing pedagogic behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of available literature within the context of academic libraries and their position to influence and lead institutional strategic change. This theory and practice is addressed and evidenced by four case studies of university libraries in the UK.

Findings

Many UK academic libraries find themselves able to lead on and influence their institution's strategic direction with regards to teaching, learning and research. This is particularly the case in the design and development of learning spaces within the university. Academic libraries are in a unique position within a university with a view to observing student behaviours, being responsive to ever changing demands from academics and students, spotting trends and benchmarking against comparative institutions. These practices make it possible for academic libraries to advise, guide and lead on teaching and learning strategy and lead on learning spaces developments within their institutions.

Practical implications

Academic libraries can use existing quality assurance, responsiveness and benchmarking frameworks to influence university strategy and decision making.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on the concept of academic libraries influencing change, rather than responding to change, within their university. The case studies provide examples of where this has been the case, and suggest ways and frameworks which can be adopted by other academic libraries.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1976

T.E. Ford

Making their first Farnborough appearance were two Grumman types among the many international newcomers. The E‐2C Hawkeye was in the static park equipped with five tons of…

Abstract

Making their first Farnborough appearance were two Grumman types among the many international newcomers. The E‐2C Hawkeye was in the static park equipped with five tons of electronic equipment that is capable of simultaneously detecting hundreds of targets over land or sea and guiding interceptors on to these targets. The Grumman F‐14A Tomcat two seat swing‐wing carrier‐based air superiority fighter gave daily flight demonstrations which hinted at its versatility. It is equipped with the AW‐9 weapons control system which is claimed to have exceptional detection ranges, standoff firing capabilities and attack modes. The Tomcat and Hawkeye are complementary and this capability was emphasised by the manufacturers, since both are in service with the US Navy and operate as a team with a high security voice and data communications system.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 48 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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