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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Lalitha Ramadass, Sushanth Arunachalam and Sagayasree Z.

The purpose of this paper is to inspect whether the people in a public place maintain social distancing. It also checks whether every individual is wearing face mask. If…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to inspect whether the people in a public place maintain social distancing. It also checks whether every individual is wearing face mask. If both are not done, the drone sends alarm signal to nearby police station and also give alarm to the public. In addition, it also carries masks and drop them to the needed people. Nearby, traffic police will also be identified and deliver water packet and mask to them if needed.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed system uses an automated drone which is used to perform the inspection process. First, the drone is being constructed by considering the parameters such as components selection, payload calculation and then assembling the drone components and connecting the drone with the mission planner software for calibrating the drone for its stability. The trained yolov3 algorithm with the custom data set is being embedded in the drone’s camera. The drone camera runs the yolov3 algorithm and detects the social distance is maintained or not and whether the people in public is wearing masks. This process is carried out by the drone automatically.

Findings

The proposed system delivers masks to people who are not wearing masks and tells importance of masks and social distancing. Thus, this proposed system would work in an efficient manner after the lockdown period ends and helps in easy social distance inspection in an automatic manner. The algorithm can be embedded in public cameras and then details can be fetched to the camera unit same as the drone unit which receives details from the drone location details and store it in database. Thus, the proposed system favours the society by saving time and helps in lowering the spread of corona virus.

Practical implications

It can be implemented practically after lockdown to inspect people in public gatherings, shopping malls, etc.

Social implications

Automated inspection reduces manpower to inspect the public and also can be used in any place.

Originality/value

This is the original project done with the help of under graduate students of third year B.E. CSE. The system was tested and validated for accuracy with real data.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Yet the use of drones for these purposes in the last two months has also exposed how much work remains to be done in getting more advanced drone services to the market.

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DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB253226

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Peter Fernandez

The word “drone” is the common term for an unmanned aerial vehicle – a robot that combines flight with sensors (usually cameras) to allow for unprecedented freedom in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The word “drone” is the common term for an unmanned aerial vehicle – a robot that combines flight with sensors (usually cameras) to allow for unprecedented freedom in observing and interacting with the world.

Design/methodology/approach

This column will explore the technology that makes modern drones possible, what makes drones useful and the role of libraries in making drones accessible to their patrons, now and in the future.

Findings

Many of these applications are equally appealing to hobbyists and professionals. For some small-scale gardeners, drones can be used to scare away pests, such as deer, or take aerial photographs that provide a new perspective of their garden.

Originality/value

For the agriculture industry, drones already account for $864.4 million in spending per year and are expected to grow to account for over $4 billion by 2022, as they are used not only to monitor and plan crops but also to plant seeds and provide accurate pesticide control (Wood, 2016).

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2021

Ehsan Rashidzadeh, Seyyed Mohammad Hadji Molana, Roya Soltani and Ashkan Hafezalkotob

Delivery management of perishable products such as blood in a supply chain is a considerable issue such that the last-mile delivery, which refers to deliver goods to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Delivery management of perishable products such as blood in a supply chain is a considerable issue such that the last-mile delivery, which refers to deliver goods to the end user as fast as possible takes into account as one of the most important, expensive and, polluting segments in the entire supply chain. Regardless of economic challenges, the last-mile delivery faces social and environmental barriers to continuing operations while complying with environmental and social standards, therefore incorporating sustainability into last-mile logistic strategy is no longer an option but rather a necessity. Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to consider a last-mile delivery in a blood supply chain in terms of using appropriate technologies such as drones to assess sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors discuss the impact of drone technology on last-mile delivery and its importance in achieving sustainability. They focus on the effect of using drones on CO2 emission, costs and social benefits by proposing a multi-objective mathematical model to assess sustainability in the last-mile delivery. A preemptive fuzzy goal programming approach to solve the model and measure the achievement degree of sustainability is conducted by using a numerical example to show the capability and usefulness of the suggested model, solution approach and, impact of drone technology in achieving all three aspects of sustainability.

Findings

The findings illustrate the achievement degree of sustainability in the delivery of blood based on locating distribution centers and allocating drones. Moreover, a comparison between drones and conventional vehicles is carried out to show the preference of using drones in reaching sustainability. A sensitivity analysis on aspects of sustainability and specifications of drone technology is conducted for validating the obtained results and distinguishing the most dominant aspect and parameters in enhancing the achievement degree of sustainability.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no research has considered the assessment of sustainability in the last-mile delivery of blood supply chain with a focus on drone technology.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Gilles Albeaino, Ricardo Eiris, Masoud Gheisari and Raja Raymond Issa

This study aims to explore DroneSim, a virtual reality (VR)-based flight training simulator, as an alternative for real-world drone-mediated building inspection training.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore DroneSim, a virtual reality (VR)-based flight training simulator, as an alternative for real-world drone-mediated building inspection training.

Design/methodology/approach

Construction, engineering and management students were asked to pilot drones in the VR-based DroneSim space and perform common flight operations and inspection tasks within the spatiotemporal context of a building construction project. Another student group was also recruited and asked to perform a similar building inspection task in real world. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)–Task Load Index (TLX) survey was used to assess students’ inflight workload demand under both Real and DroneSim conditions. Post-assessment questionnaires were also used to analyze students’ feedback regarding the usability and presence of DroneSim for drone building inspection training.

Findings

None of the NASA–TLX task load levels under Real and DroneSim conditions were highly rated by students, and both groups experienced comparable drone-building inspection training. Students perceived DroneSim positively and found the VR experience stimulating.

Originality/value

This study’s contribution is twofold: to better understand the development stages involved in the design of a VR-based drone flight training simulator, specifically for building inspection tasks; and to improve construction students’ drone operational and flight training skills by offering them the opportunity to enhance their drone navigation skills in a risk-free, repeatable yet realistic environment. Such contributions ultimately pave the way for better integration of drone-mediated building inspection training in construction education while meeting industry needs.

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2020

Andy Miah

This chapter considers the regulatory concerns around drone use, what might be the greatest risks associated with their widespread use in civilian airspace. It also…

Abstract

This chapter considers the regulatory concerns around drone use, what might be the greatest risks associated with their widespread use in civilian airspace. It also examines the development of regulations as evidence of an emerging moral consciousness. It focusses on regulations developed in the UK and the USA, while drawing attention to the global laws that are beginning to emerge through the United Nations. As well, it examines some of the key controversies associated with civilian drone flight, which range from questions about minimum age, pilot qualifications, matters of personal privacy and the challenge with developing a drone highway in the sky. This chapter provides crucial insights into the state of the art of drone rules providing guidance on what is possible to do legally and what has yet to be fully resolved in terms of public regulation.

Details

Drones: The Brilliant, the Bad and the Beautiful
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-985-9

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Abstract

Details

Drones and the Law
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-249-9

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

Patrick Holzmann, Christian Wankmüller, Dietfried Globocnik and Erich J. Schwarz

Mountaineering and related activities are increasingly becoming popular and are accompanied by an increase in medical incidents. Emergency operations in mountainous…

Abstract

Purpose

Mountaineering and related activities are increasingly becoming popular and are accompanied by an increase in medical incidents. Emergency operations in mountainous terrain are time-critical and often pose major logistical challenges for rescuers. Drones are expected to improve the operational performance of mountain rescuers. However, they are not yet widely used in mountain rescue missions. This paper examines the determinants that drive the behavioral intention of mountain rescuers to adopt drones in rescue missions.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a behavioral study that builds upon an extended model of the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) and investigates the relationship between individual attitudes, perceptions, and intentions for drone adoption. Original survey data of 146 mountain rescuers were analyzed using moderated ordinary least squares (OLS) regression analysis.

Findings

Results indicate that the behavioral intention to use drones in mountain rescue missions is driven by the expected performance gains and facilitating conditions. Favorable supporting conditions and experience with drones further moderate the relationship between performance expectancy and behavioral intention. The effects for effort expectancy, social influence, and demonstrations were not significant.

Practical implications

Rescue organizations and stakeholders are recommended to consider the identified determinants in the implementation of drones in emergency logistics. Drone manufacturers targeting mountain rescue organizations are advised to focus on operational performance, provide sufficient support and training, and promote the gathering of practical experience.

Originality/value

A tailored-model that provides first empirical results on the relevance of personal and environmental factors for the acceptance of drones in emergency logistics is presented.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2020

Andy Miah

This chapter explores how drones are used for morally controversial applications, while also interrogating the distinctiveness of these functions. It focusses on the uses…

Abstract

This chapter explores how drones are used for morally controversial applications, while also interrogating the distinctiveness of these functions. It focusses on the uses of drones for purposes of human destruction, analysing documentary and film as insights into the impacts of such applications. In so doing, the chapter considers how drones change the nature of military conflict, creating even greater removal of the human subject from the location in which violence occurs. It also inquires into what it means when preparation for war is best achieved through experimental and playful enterprises, such as drone racing and gaming culture. Finally, the chapter documents some of the more harmful uses of drones in civilian crime and disorder contexts.

Details

Drones: The Brilliant, the Bad and the Beautiful
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-985-9

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Vivek Seharwat

Abstract

Details

Drones and the Law
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-249-9

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