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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Hashem Mohammad Khries

This paper aims to help archaeologists, museums’ curators and technicians in understanding the principle of using the photogrammetry and 3D scanner for the museum…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to help archaeologists, museums’ curators and technicians in understanding the principle of using the photogrammetry and 3D scanner for the museum archaeological objects in a practical way by presenting specific examples for both methods. Another purpose is to evaluate the performance offered by the photogrammetry and the three-dimensional (3D) scanner device, with the aim of providing a suitable solution to the different shapes and sizes of the archaeological objects.

Design/methodology/approach

The author used the camera Canon EOS 1300 D for photographing and Einscan Pro 2X Plus as a 3D scanning device for several years on different kinds of objects made of various materials, including ceramic, stone, glass and metal.

Findings

This paper showed that both approaches create 3D models with high resolution in easy and different ways.

Practical implications

Handling objects and preparing them for photographing or scanning has involved a number of caveats and challenges regarding the risk of damage that the author had to bear in mind.

Originality/value

This paper is completely based on the author’s personal experiences of creating 3D image of various objects in the project of Documentation of Objects in the Jordanian Archaeological Museums.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9326

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2018

Kristy Henson, Paul Constantino, F. Robin O’Keefe and Greg Popovich

The topic of human skeletal analysis is a sensitive subject in North America. Laws and regulations surrounding research of human skeletal material make it difficult to use…

Abstract

Purpose

The topic of human skeletal analysis is a sensitive subject in North America. Laws and regulations surrounding research of human skeletal material make it difficult to use these remains to characterize various populations. Recent technology has the potential to solve this dilemma. Three-dimensional (3D) scanning creates virtual models of this material, and stores the information, allowing future studies on the material. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

To assess the potential of this methodology, the authors compared processing time, accuracy and costs of computer tomography (CT) scanner to the Artec Eva portable 3D surface scanner. Using both methodologies the authors scanned and 3D printed one adult individual. The authors hypothesize that the Artec Eva will create digital replicas of <5 percent error based on Buikstra and Ubelaker standard osteometric measurements. Error was tested by comparing the measurements of the skeletal material to the Artec data, CT data and 3D printed data.

Findings

Results show that larger bones recorded by the Artec Eva have <5 percent error of the original specimen while smaller more detailed images have >5 percent error. The CT images are closer to <5 percent accuracy, with few bones still >5 percent error. The Artec Eva scanner is inexpensive in comparison to a CT machine, but takes twice as long to process the Eva’s data. The Artec Eva is sufficient in replication of larger elements, but the CT machine is still a preferable means of skeletal replication, particularly for small elements.

Originality/value

This research paper is unique because it compares two common forms of digitization, which has not been done. The authors believe this paper would be of value to natural history curators and various researchers.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2018

Abdul Fatah Firdaus Abu Hanipah and Khairul Nizam Tahar

Laser scanning technique is used to measure and model objects using point cloud data generated laser pulses. Conventional techniques to construct 3D models are time…

Abstract

Purpose

Laser scanning technique is used to measure and model objects using point cloud data generated laser pulses. Conventional techniques to construct 3D models are time consuming, costly and need more manpower. The purpose of this paper is to assess the 3D model of the Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah Mosque’s main dome using a terrestrial laser scanner.

Design/methodology/approach

A laser scanner works through line of sight, which indicates that multiple scans need to be taken from a different view to ensure a complete data set. Targets must spread in all directions, and targets should be placed on fixed structures and flat surfaces for the normal scan and fine scan. After the scanning operation, point cloud data from the laser scanner were cleaned and registered before a 3D model could be developed.

Findings

As a result, the reconstruction of the 3D model was successfully developed. The samples are based on the triangle dimension, curve line, horizontal dimension and vertical dimension at the dome. The standard deviation and accuracy are calculated based on the comparison of the 21 samples taken between the high-resolution and low-resolution scanning data.

Originality/value

There are many ways to develop the 3D model and based on this study, the less complex ways also produce the best result. The authors implement the different types of dimensions for the 3D model assessment, which have not yet been considered in the past.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Liu Chi and Richard Kennon

Aims to check the validity of measurements of dynamic postures recorded by a body scanner.

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to check the validity of measurements of dynamic postures recorded by a body scanner.

Design/methodology/approach

Measurements between various anatomical landmarks have been taken both manually and using a 3D body scanner so that the validity of the measurements might be assessed when dynamic postures are adopted. Mechanical measurements of changes in the body surface dimensions have been compared with figures produced by a body scanner for both the standard natural position and for five dynamic postures, which must be accommodated when designing high‐performance garments.

Findings

Although the 3D body scanner collects data almost instantaneously and without physical contact with the target surface, the readings taken in respect of dynamic poses showed significant variations from manually‐taken measurements, with discrepancies as large as 6.8 cm over a 16 cm distance.

Research limitations/implications

The research has only been carried out on a very limited number of subjects. However, significant differences between manual and automatic body measurements are clearly demonstrated.

Practical implications

The research showed that as there are as yet no universally‐accepted conventions for 3D scanner measurements, the results appear to be optimised for the natural anatomical position. Body‐scanners are not well‐suited to taking measurements of dynamic postures expected in sporting activities.

Originality/value

Measurements of anthropometric landmarks for high‐performance activities have not previously been assessed, and these results usefully indicate the limitations of current 3D scanning technology.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2017

Miyeon Lee, Dong Il Yoo and Sungmin Kim

The purpose of this paper is to develop a relatively inexpensive and easily movable three-dimensional (3D) body scanner.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a relatively inexpensive and easily movable three-dimensional (3D) body scanner.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple depth perception cameras and a turntable were used to form the hardware and a client-server computer network was used to control the hardware.

Findings

A portable and inexpensive yet quite accurate body scanner system has been developed.

Research limitations/implications

The turntable mechanism and semi-automatic model alignment caused some error.

Practical implications

This scanner is expected to facilitate the acquisition of 3D human body or garment data easily for various research projects.

Social implications

Many researchers might have an easy access to 3D data of large object such as body or whole garment.

Originality/value

Inexpensive yet expandable scanning system has been developed using readily available components.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

Hein Daanen and Sung‐Ae Hong

New techniques are required to link 3D whole body scans to manufacturing techniques to allow for the mass‐customization of clothes. This study aims to compare two methods…

Abstract

Purpose

New techniques are required to link 3D whole body scans to manufacturing techniques to allow for the mass‐customization of clothes. This study aims to compare two methods of producing skirts based on 3D whole body scans.

Design/methodology/approach

Three females participated in the study. They were scanned with an accurate 3D whole body scanner. A set of relevant 1D measures was automatically derived from the 3D scan. The measures were incorporated in a skirt pattern and the skirt was made from jeans material. The second method was based on triangulation of the scanned waist‐to‐hip part. The points in the 3D scan were first converted to triangles and these triangles were thereafter merged with neighboring triangles of similar orientation until about 40 triangles remained. These triangles were sewn together to form a “patchwork”‐skirt. All females performed fit tests afterwards.

Findings

The fit of the 3D‐generated patchwork skirt was much better than the fit of the skirt generated by the 1D scan‐derived measures. In the latter case, two of the three skirts were too wide because the scan‐derived hip circumference exceeded the manually derived values. For the 3D generated skirt, it was necessary to enlarge the triangles with a factor of 1.025 to achieve optimal fit.

Originality/value

As far as is known, this is the first study that reports a direct conversion of a 3D scan to clothing without interference of clothing patterns. The study shows that it is possible to generate a fitting patchwork skirt based on 3D scans; the intermediate step of using 1D measures derived from 3D scans is shown to be error‐prone.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2009

Maurice Murphy, Eugene McGovern and Sara Pavia

The purpose of this research is to outline in detail the procedure of remote data capture using laser scanning and the subsequent processing required in order to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to outline in detail the procedure of remote data capture using laser scanning and the subsequent processing required in order to identify a new methodology for creating full engineering drawings (orthographic and 3D models) from laser scan and image survey data for historic structures.

Design/methodology/approach

Historic building information modelling (HBIM) is proposed as a new system of modelling historic structures; the HBIM process begins with remote collection of survey data using a terrestrial laser scanner combined with digital cameras. A range of software programs is then used to combine the image and scan data.

Findings

Meshing of the point cloud followed by texturing from the image data creates a framework for the creation of a 3D model. Mapping of BIM objects onto the 3D surface model is the final stage in the reverse engineering process, creating full 2D and 3D models including detail behind the object's surface concerning its methods of construction and material makeup, this new process is described as HBIM.

Originality/value

The future research within this area will concentrate on three main stands. The initial strand is to attempt improve the application of geometric descriptive language to build complex parametric objects. The second stand is the development of a library of parametric based on historic data (from Vitruvius to 18th century architectural pattern books). Finally, while it is possible to plot parametric objects onto the laser scan data, there is need to identify intermediate software platforms to accelerate this stage within the HBIM framework.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Hyungki Kim, Moohyun Cha, Byung Chul Kim, Taeyun Kim and Duhwan Mun

The purpose of this study is the use of 3D printing technology to perform maintenance on damaged parts on site. To maintain damaged parts, the user needs experience in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is the use of 3D printing technology to perform maintenance on damaged parts on site. To maintain damaged parts, the user needs experience in the parts design and 3D printing technology. To help users who have little or no experience on 3D printing, a part library-based information retrieval and inspection framework was proposed to support the process of manufacturing replaceable parts using a 3D printer.

Design/methodology/approach

To establish the framework, 3D printing-based maintenance procedure was first defined, comprising retrieval, manufacturing and inspection steps, while identifying the technical components required to perform the procedure. Once the technical components are identified, part library-based information retrieval and inspection framework was defined based on the technical components and the relationships between the components. For validation of the concept of the framework, prototype system is developed according to the proposed framework.

Findings

The feasibility of the proposed framework is proved through maintenance experiments on gaskets and O-rings.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this study is the proposal of the framework, which aims to support the maintenance of damaged parts for the user who has little or no experience in part design or does not know how to operate a 3D printer.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Jun‐Bao Li, Meng Li and Huijun Gao

Computer‐aided fragmented cultural relics repair is an effective method instead of manual repair. The purpose of this paper is to provide a 3D digital patching system for…

Abstract

Purpose

Computer‐aided fragmented cultural relics repair is an effective method instead of manual repair. The purpose of this paper is to provide a 3D digital patching system for computer‐aided cultural relics repair through using the scanned 3D data of fragmented cultural relics. It includes processes and tools that can be effectively used for fragmented cultural relics repair.

Design/methodology/approach

An automatic 3D digital patching for fragmented culture relics repair is designed. The framework includes a surface segmentation based on region dilation, feature extraction based on height‐map, pair matching and multi‐block matching.

Findings

The paper finds that the proposed 3D data patching is an efficient method for fragmented cultural relics repair.

Practical implications

Early and effective planning and implementation of computer‐aided fragmented cultural relics repair can significantly improve the reliability and availability of fragmented cultural relics repair.

Originality/value

The paper presents a uniform framework of 3D digital patching for fragmented cultural relics repair.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

David Page, Andreas Koschan, Sophie Voisin, Ngozi Ali and Mongi Abidi

Investigate the use of two imaging‐based methods – coded pattern projection and laser‐based triangulation – to generate 3D models as input to a rapid prototyping pipeline.

Abstract

Purpose

Investigate the use of two imaging‐based methods – coded pattern projection and laser‐based triangulation – to generate 3D models as input to a rapid prototyping pipeline.

Design/methodology/approach

Discusses structured lighting technologies as suitable imaging‐based methods. Two approaches, coded‐pattern projection and laser‐based triangulation, are specifically identified and discussed in detail. Two commercial systems are used to generate experimental results. These systems include the Genex Technologies 3D FaceCam and the Integrated Vision Products Ranger System.

Findings

Presents 3D reconstructions of objects from each of the commercial systems.

Research limitations/implications

Provides background in imaging‐based methods for 3D data collection and model generation. A practical limitation is that imaging‐based systems do not currently meet accuracy requirements, but continued improvements in imaging systems will minimize this limitation.

Practical implications

Imaging‐based approaches to 3D model generation offer potential to increase scanning time and reduce scanning complexity.

Originality/value

Introduces imaging‐based concepts to the rapid prototyping pipeline.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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