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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Barbara Brownie

The purpose of this paper is to propose that, within the practice of motion branding, transforming type has been largely neglected by existing theorists and its importance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose that, within the practice of motion branding, transforming type has been largely neglected by existing theorists and its importance to wider marketing trends overlooked. It will be observed that previous texts on transitional letterforms have tended to focus on changes in global arrangement and in doing so have neglected to recognise the significance of changes that occur at a local level, within individual letterforms.

Design/methodology/approach

Taking an interdisciplinary approach, with examples including idents and bumpers from Channel 4, Sky, FOX, Five and MTV. New methods of understanding these artefacts will be introduced, with emphasis on how they affect the relationship between broadcaster’s identities and the medium of television. Modes of definition and understanding that have previously been applied to holographic poetry will be applied to the field of on-screen artefacts.

Findings

The paper will discuss how branding has adapted to incorporate the features of the medium of television, and propose new methods of classification for the associated processes of metamorphosis, construction, parallax and revelation.

Originality/value

Motion branding, in the form of television idents, is frequently described as containing “motion typography”, but this and related terminology is vague or misleading – and reduces all forms of kineticism to simple motion. On-screen branding often operates more complex temporal behaviours. Lack of sufficient vocabulary to describe such transformations has forced practitioners to describe their work in terms of previously existing work, thereby limiting the perceived scope of their ideas and the possibility of innovation. This paper resolves the lack of existing vocabulary by providing new definitions of four categories of fluid transformation that appear in contemporary television idents.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Iain Macdonald

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how designers attempt to engage audiences through different media in TV idents; and to explore how the human mark (such as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how designers attempt to engage audiences through different media in TV idents; and to explore how the human mark (such as drawing and model making) in a hybrid with digital media can not only revitalise traditions in design, but also the reception of illusion in this context.

Design/methodology/approach

The study focuses on the work of RedBee Media, a company that has a global market and reputation. The phenomenology of how BBC Three and BBC 2 Christmas were rebranded was examined through interviews with the designers and animators involved. Taking a media industry studies lens to examine an art/technology divide the author will expand the visual culture theory of Manovich’s (2007) metamedium.

Findings

The influence of technology on television graphic design is contested and continual. Designers might begin to question rather than rely on technology through the process of design. They can confront generic software solutions and apply more critical skills to explore fusions of heritage and digital processes in a metamedium.

Research limitations/implications

This research was focused on a UK broadcaster and a single UK creative agency with a global influence. Future research should examine leading creative practice in other international markets.

Practical implications

The significance of this research is in understanding the materiality and creativity in the artform of TV idents and how designers attempt to engage audiences through different media.

Originality/value

Academics in media and design history are acknowledging the cultural significance of television branding. Design practitioners need to understand why and how in the work of others.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Andreas Schneider

Details a cross‐cultural study to expose the extent to which public concern regulates sexual‐eroticism and withdraws it from public attention; identifies a propensity…

Abstract

Details a cross‐cultural study to expose the extent to which public concern regulates sexual‐eroticism and withdraws it from public attention; identifies a propensity towards the ideal of sexual constraint within US society, reflected by a high degree of regulation and criminalization of sexuality ‐ ranging from strict policies on sexual‐harassment to the restriction of explicit images, even for sex education purposes. Compares with the more liberal attitudes exhibited in Germany. Develops an empirical model to establish cultural differences in attitudes to sexual issues; confirms that Germans are less likely to stigmatize sexual eroticism than their American contemporaries. Concludes that Germans exhibit emotions that typify sexual emancipation, compared with the sexually constrained emotions of Americans; suggests a link between the repression of sexual emotions and violence in society.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 19 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Caroline J. Oates and Nicki Newman

This paper aims to identify the different types of food featured on children's television in the UK and how frequently they appear.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the different types of food featured on children's television in the UK and how frequently they appear.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis of children's television across four popular UK channels (CBBC, CBeebies, CiTV, Five) was carried out in Autumn 2008. All output including programmes, advertisements, sponsorship, trailers and idents was examined for verbal and visual instances of food and drink. Food and drink mentions were classified according to food categories.

Findings

The results showed a high incidence of food across the different kinds of output and across the four channels. In programmes, food mentions were skewed towards healthy (68.7 per cent v. 31.3 per cent) rather than unhealthy foods. The most frequent categories of food were fruit and vegetables, desserts, and grains.

Research limitations/implications

The findings presented here are based on four channels, and analysis of 84 hours of television content aimed at children. The study represents a qualitative picture based on a limited sample at a specific point in time.

Practical implications

The results demonstrate that Ofcom's latest UK guidelines on television advertising of HFSS foods are being adhered to during children's programmes, and question whether programming and other types of output offer a positive or negative view of food and whether they too require intervention.

Originality/value

The results widen the debate about obesity and television advertising by considering the importance of editorial content and other marketing communications in terms of food portrayal on children's television.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Peter Meech

The promotion of television programmes and television channels is becoming increasingly important in the UK as it is elsewhere. This study focuses on those forms which…

Abstract

The promotion of television programmes and television channels is becoming increasingly important in the UK as it is elsewhere. This study focuses on those forms which appear on‐air between programmes on British television and which have come to be known collectively as “clutter”. The forms which this clutter takes and their marketing communications functions are discussed, with analyses provided of specific examples. A number of issues arising from the growing practice of on‐air promotions are identified and suggestions made for possible future research in the field.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Book part
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Aitziber Arregi Uzuriaga, Fred Freundlich and Monica Gago

To examine perceptions of organizational atmosphere and joint ownership in a firm in which capital ownership is broadly shared among members of its work force.A…

Abstract

To examine perceptions of organizational atmosphere and joint ownership in a firm in which capital ownership is broadly shared among members of its work force.

A questionnaire was administered with a sample of 123 people from a Mondragon cooperative firm, ULMA Architectural Solutions, and responses were analyzed using principal components’ analysis and regression techniques.

Two factors are found to play especially important roles in explaining perceptions: (1) work and management/supervisory practices, especially those relating to communication and participation in decisions in respondents’ immediate work area, and (2) job type (blue collar vs. white collar).

The study confirms earlier research on the broad centrality of participation and related practices to perceptions of work and the organization in employee ownership settings, while findings focus on the immediate work environment and relationships with immediate managers for blue-collar workers.

These are closely related to the research implications, underlining the importance to worker-owners, in manufacturing contexts, of communication and involvement in decisions in their immediate work environment.

Widespread concerns about inequality, poor working conditions, and competitiveness suggest the importance of investigating enterprises with broadly shared capital ownership, enterprises that tend to address these concerns.

The chapter reinforces the fundamental roles of information-sharing and participation in enterprises with shared ownership, while making key distinctions between shopfloor and office workers experiences and perceptions.

Details

Employee Ownership and Employee Involvement at Work: Case Studies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-520-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Gerard McCusker

This study attempts to fill the gap in organisational identity literature. It describes the use of sound in communicating brand identity and explains the roles of the…

Abstract

This study attempts to fill the gap in organisational identity literature. It describes the use of sound in communicating brand identity and explains the roles of the principal ‘players’ in the production of one organisation's audio identity. As a case study, this research focuses on Radio Scotland's need for an identifiable sound, and also details the process involved in the design and implementation of its identity. Information about the case was generated via unstructured, open‐ended interviews with key informants within Radio Scotland and external parties who participated in the project. A chronology is used to present the findings of the case with analysis of the data led by four key research issues concerning: —sound's ability to communicate identity, —the balance between science and intuition in designing audio identity, —responsibility for sound identity production, and —requisite qualifications or knowledge for shaping audio identity. Conclusions show the use of sound to be instrumental in communicating Radio Scotland's identity, with the author suggesting that more research should be undertaken into the role of audio designs given the growth explosion in audio visual communications technology.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Electronic identification systems are being increasingly used in flexible assembly. Brian Rooks reviews a report from Bosch and the German IDENT exhibition.

Abstract

Electronic identification systems are being increasingly used in flexible assembly. Brian Rooks reviews a report from Bosch and the German IDENT exhibition.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

Jafar Jafari

Fieldwork is one of the hallmarks of anthropology. Almost all students of anthropology have geographical and cultural specializations, ranging from a small group to a…

Abstract

Fieldwork is one of the hallmarks of anthropology. Almost all students of anthropology have geographical and cultural specializations, ranging from a small group to a nation. Their interest areas are often identified or marked by real or putative boundaries; and it is within these boundaries that anthropologists have “founded” their own villages and tribes — “my village”, “my tribe.”

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2001

Peter Meech

In recent years UK television broadcasting organisations have increasingly come to realise the importance of building relationships with their various stakeholders. In…

Abstract

In recent years UK television broadcasting organisations have increasingly come to realise the importance of building relationships with their various stakeholders. In particular, substantial resources have been invested in a variety of activities to brand these stations, both on‐ and off‐air. As part of a continuing programme of research into the on‐air aspects of television’s self‐promotion, this paper considers what is probably the most salient of these activities: on‐air corporate trails or promos. These are to be distinguished from other, related forms which are seen on television sets, notably station idents and trails for individual programmes or series. By contrast corporate trails, like corporate advertising, attempt to foster a broader positive image of the organisation concerned among viewers, advertisers, shareholders (where appropriate), legislators, independent producers, the rest of the media, in‐house staff and other groups. The case of the BBC is especially interesting on two counts: now more than ever it has to struggle to justify itself as a public service broadcaster funded by a licence fee, and it has been responsible for producing some of the most creatively adventurous campaigns.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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