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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Walt Crawford

Words on paper: that's the end result of most personal computing, at least in library related fields. The author revisits a topic covered extensively in his earlier…

Abstract

Words on paper: that's the end result of most personal computing, at least in library related fields. The author revisits a topic covered extensively in his earlier articles, but takes on a very different aspect this time around: typographic options for word processing. Content may be the crucial objective of written communication, but good typography can't hurt and frequently helps, while bad typography can get in the way of communication. The author notes some major options for desktop typography, discusses some of the issues involved in making the choices, and reviews Swfte Glyphix, a lesser‐known system for generating any size typeface, as needed, while using Microsoft Word or WordPerfect. January‐March 1990 brought more of the same in PC magazines; the most interesting new development for library PC users might be the introduction of the Hewlett‐Packard LaserJet III, which has been used to “typeset” this issue of Library Hi Tech.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Olga Ampuero and Natalia Vila

This paper seeks to discuss the need to understand consumer perceptions in order to correctly design product packing and to achieve the desired position in the minds of consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to discuss the need to understand consumer perceptions in order to correctly design product packing and to achieve the desired position in the minds of consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was divided into two phases. The first, (based on designers' opinions), to determine the key graphic variables in the design of packaging. The second, (based on consumers' opinions), to associate each packaging with a positioning strategy. The seven product‐positioning strategies selected were represented from the consumers' standpoint using multidimensional scaling. Four maps were obtained related to: alternative packaging colours; alternative packaging typography; alternative packaging graphical forms; alternative packaging images

Findings

Each positioning strategy appears associated with particular packaging dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

Consumers have exhibited harmonious perceptions towards products‐packaging strategies, so one can conclude that a general feeling as to what a particular packaging exactly means exists. So the general opinion should guide packaging designers to appropriately meet consumers' expectations.

Originality/value

A range of simulated packaging was prepared for the 46 consumers that took part in the two‐phase experiment: One of the seven positioning strategies was explained. For example: “Product ‘A’ is positioned as reasonably priced. People say the price is OK”; Case to be solved: “From this selection, choose the packaging that seems most suitable for product ‘A’, taking its characteristics into account”. The simulated packaging alternatives were shown and the subject chose the options that seemed most suitable (colour, typography, forms and images). The sequence was repeated for the remaining six positioning typologies.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Reference Reviews, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Barbara Brownie

The purpose of this paper is to propose that, within the practice of motion branding, transforming type has been largely neglected by existing theorists and its importance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose that, within the practice of motion branding, transforming type has been largely neglected by existing theorists and its importance to wider marketing trends overlooked. It will be observed that previous texts on transitional letterforms have tended to focus on changes in global arrangement and in doing so have neglected to recognise the significance of changes that occur at a local level, within individual letterforms.

Design/methodology/approach

Taking an interdisciplinary approach, with examples including idents and bumpers from Channel 4, Sky, FOX, Five and MTV. New methods of understanding these artefacts will be introduced, with emphasis on how they affect the relationship between broadcaster’s identities and the medium of television. Modes of definition and understanding that have previously been applied to holographic poetry will be applied to the field of on-screen artefacts.

Findings

The paper will discuss how branding has adapted to incorporate the features of the medium of television, and propose new methods of classification for the associated processes of metamorphosis, construction, parallax and revelation.

Originality/value

Motion branding, in the form of television idents, is frequently described as containing “motion typography”, but this and related terminology is vague or misleading – and reduces all forms of kineticism to simple motion. On-screen branding often operates more complex temporal behaviours. Lack of sufficient vocabulary to describe such transformations has forced practitioners to describe their work in terms of previously existing work, thereby limiting the perceived scope of their ideas and the possibility of innovation. This paper resolves the lack of existing vocabulary by providing new definitions of four categories of fluid transformation that appear in contemporary television idents.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

David Reed

In an examination of the pages of Youth's Companion one of the leading US magazines lasting right through the nineteenth century, the evolution of typography, good quality…

Abstract

In an examination of the pages of Youth's Companion one of the leading US magazines lasting right through the nineteenth century, the evolution of typography, good quality copy and creative layouts are considered. Blocks did not appear until 1871, but even by 1858 there was an awareness of typography and the benefits of white space. The influence of social and historical events is noted. By the end of the century, the soap industry emerges as the most noticeable innovator in copy quality, This close analysis of one magazine may overturn some accepted ideas, and a wider survey of an underdeveloped field is called for by the author.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Walt Crawford

A curious and unexpected thing has happened to personal computing typography: it's gotten cheaper and much more interesting, thanks to TrueType, a new digital typography

Abstract

A curious and unexpected thing has happened to personal computing typography: it's gotten cheaper and much more interesting, thanks to TrueType, a new digital typography standard that nobody (including the author) took seriously when it was first proposed. The author evaluates eight TrueType type collections costing from 10 cents to $1.25 per typeface. This article discusses that evaluation, and also evaluates a $19 CD‐ROM with more than 400 typefaces. The results may surprise you. They certainly surprised the author, when a company perhaps best known for selling cheap software in Canadian convenience stores proved to have not only the cheapest (per typeface) but also the best all‐around inexpensive typeface collection. The author also provides notes on the literature for April‐June 1993, including the last issues of PC Sources.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Teresa Sarmento and Pedro Quelhas-Brito

This paper aims to identify and compare the graphical shapes and meanings attributed to place/city by the designer/creative/author of a city visual identity (VI) and by…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify and compare the graphical shapes and meanings attributed to place/city by the designer/creative/author of a city visual identity (VI) and by the client and designer’s peers.

Design/methodology/approach

To identify and compare the graphical shapes and meanings attributed to place/city by the designer/creative/author of a city VI and by the client and designer’s peers.

Findings

This paper analysed the way the visual culture of different stakeholders influenced the process and the construction of the iconographic meanings. Secondly, this paper assessed how the design tools impacted the creative process in that specific context.

Practical implications

A demanding involvement of more participants in the design process can be worthy for a VI outcome. Visual identity of a city is both designer’s creative as a political process. The several aesthetical options decisions implied adaptation, trade-offs and negotiations.

Originality/value

This research explains how the design tools and forms were used in the creative process of designers when conceiving the VI of a place. This research also reveals how a design work can have an effective impact on the sensory qualities emanating from city brands which are recognized by tourists and citizens. The consideration of the designer’s tools makes a relevant contribution to understand some underlying procedural issues.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Stuart Weibel

The CORE project is an electronic library prototype that providesnetworked access to the full text and graphics content of AmericanChemical Society journals and associated

Abstract

The CORE project is an electronic library prototype that provides networked access to the full text and graphics content of American Chemical Society journals and associated Chemical Abstracts Service indexing since 1980 (some 250 journal years of data). The database is coded in Standard Generalized Markup Language (translated from original typography codes) which captures the structural richness of the original document and provides flexibility for indexing, searching, and display. The prototype provides a full‐scale laboratory environment in which to explore issues of database structure, user interface capabilities, and information retrieval questions on a large, real‐world scholarly electronic journal database. The complete database, representing more than 600,000 pages of full text and graphics, will be the largest electronic corpus of its kind. Scheduled for availability at Cornell in late 1993, this database will be available for use by the Cornell Chemistry Department faculty and students on a local area network (although the architecture of the CORE system is extensible to wide area networks as well)

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Hosam Al-Samarraie, Atef Eldenfria, Fahed Zaqout and Melissa Lee Price

The impact of different screen-based typography styles on individuals’ cognitive processing of information has not been given much consideration in the literature, though…

Abstract

Purpose

The impact of different screen-based typography styles on individuals’ cognitive processing of information has not been given much consideration in the literature, though such differences would imply different learning outcomes. This study aims to enrich the current understanding of the impact of reading in single- and multiple-column types on students’ cognitive processing.

Design/methodology/approach

An electroencephalogram (EEG) was used to record and analyze the brain signals of 27 students while reading from single- and multiple- column layouts.

Findings

The results showed a significant difference in students’ cognitive load when reading text from different types of columns. All students exerted less processing efforts when text was presented in two-column format, thus experiencing less cognitive load.

Originality/value

Using EEG, this study examined the neural consequences of reading in single- and multiple-column types on cognitive load during reading. The findings can be used to enrich the current instructional design practices on how different typographical formats facilitate learners’ cognitive performance.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Kevin Curran and Michelle Casey

Electronic mail (e‐mail) and messaging systems are a powerful means of communication which are fast become a primary means of communication. This paper aims to describe…

Abstract

Purpose

Electronic mail (e‐mail) and messaging systems are a powerful means of communication which are fast become a primary means of communication. This paper aims to describe the need for expression in e‐mail.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes the need for expression in e‐mail and the development of a personalised e‐mail system. A survey is carried out to comprehend the derived meanings from visuals; as a result the prototype is formed.

Findings

This paper presents a prototype which utilises the idea of reading pictures as sentences and the semiotic and linguistic meaning derived from those sentences. The system aims to interpret the sender's thoughts and convey their emotion and personality through a combination of graphical components, image, and expressive typography. In contrast with the new developing successful language that is rapidly spreading in the use of mobile devices, this personalized e‐mail introduces a visual language that people will acquire in using their e‐mails. Initial findings are presented from exercises of visual literacy, where the viewer has to play a series of matching games with words and images in order to derive each user's meanings and interpretations.

Research limitations/implications

This interactive piece is attempting to transform the static nature of e‐mail into a more dynamic form that can offer new ways to interpret verbal information visually. The device will instill the user's message with more authentic personalities and expressions.

Practical implications

Cognitive semiotics is something designers explore over time with intuition and experience. Introducing and equipping young designers in college, with regard to semiotics would speed up this essential and unavoidable mental process.

Originality/value

This research will accelerate the coming of emotion to computer systems. Graphic design should be viewed from a structuralism perspective as a language system, to extend the understanding of language from a spoken and written system of signs to a manner of visual signals. Designers play a part in reinventing and redefining signs and symbols.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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