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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2021

Siew-Wei Yeong, Zhien-Hung Kon, Siew-Chin Ong and Zaheer-Ud-Din Babar

This study looked at the impact of a community-based public health campaign on hypertension and diabetes mellitus awareness and prevention, as well as student experiential…

Abstract

Purpose

This study looked at the impact of a community-based public health campaign on hypertension and diabetes mellitus awareness and prevention, as well as student experiential learning in a campaign conducted by pharmacy students.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sampling cross-sectional pre–post survey was done to assess disease awareness and knowledge among those who attended the health campaign. The data analysis includes a total of 230 participants with complete data. After the campaign, the pharmacy students used self-assessment to reflect their learning experience.

Findings

Most participants were unaware of their blood pressure and blood glucose readings, but they reported improved awareness of diseases and prevention of hypertension and diabetes after the health campaign. Although most participants correctly identified the common signs and symptoms of hypertension, few could associate it with overweight. Most participants were unaware of the 5 g per day salt intake limit for controlling hypertension before the campaign. Most participants were less aware that diabetes is associated with impaired vision, peripheral neuropathy, renal and heart diseases. Students expressed increased confidence in leadership, teamwork and communication abilities after the campaign based on self-assessment.

Practical implications

A health campaign enhances the disease knowledge of the general public. It has been suggested that experiential learning be encouraged in the pharmacy curriculum.

Originality/value

This study adds to the knowledge on the roles of community-based health campaigns and the value of pharmacy students’ involvement in experiential learning.

Details

Health Education, vol. 121 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2021

Fulvio Fortezza, Alessandro Pagano and Roberta Bocconcelli

Even though the crowdfunding (CF) literature is rapidly reaching its maturity phase, the topic of serial CF (i.e. the participation in more than one CF campaign) is as…

Abstract

Purpose

Even though the crowdfunding (CF) literature is rapidly reaching its maturity phase, the topic of serial CF (i.e. the participation in more than one CF campaign) is as much promising as still largely under explored. This study thus aims to offer a thorough view of the dynamic and complex processes characterizing the participation of the start-ups to more than one campaign adopting a business network perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

In line with an explorative research aim, a multiple case study analysis is performed by taking into consideration four start-ups engaged in more than one CF campaigns with different combinations of equity and non-equity CF, adopting the actor–resource–activity (ARA) model as theoretical framework.

Findings

Multiple CF campaigns are embedded in the overall changing startup’s network and are affected by the concurrent and overlapping startup’s development processes. From this standpoint, the adoption of the ARA model suggests to reconsider the “serial” dimension of multiple CF campaigns. These processes can be more or less “linear” as they could be affected by the combination of CF schemes and by the degree of alignment of actors, activities and resources, whose “assembly” can be facilitated by learning processes and impaired by unexpected circumstances.

Originality/value

This paper explores in depth the startup’s serial CF journey, building on recent studies calling for stronger analyses of the directions and outcomes of innovative funding trajectories pursued and implemented by new business ventures. From this standpoint, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to consider a complete spectrum of combinations between CF schemes within serial CF, thus allowing for a better understanding of the role of such a factor within a dynamic and contextual view, that is, that offered by the business network perspective. This paper also contributes to the Industrial Marketing and Purchasing research on start-ups.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2021

Gimede Gigante and Giacomo Cozzio

This study analyses the success factors of crowdfunding campaigns in the real estate sector.

Abstract

Purpose

This study analyses the success factors of crowdfunding campaigns in the real estate sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The success factors of general crowdfunding campaigns were identified then adapted to real estate and tested through multiple statistical analyses (T-tests, correlation matrices, variance inflation factor (VIF) and linear regression).

Findings

The findings shows that crowdfunding use in the real estate sector is evolving and that crowdfunding is a potentially disruptive tool in this sector. They also demonstrate that project duration and expected return on investment (ROI) play key roles in campaign success.

Research limitations/implications

Results are based on the Italian context only. Extending the analysis to other markets represents a fruitful starting point for further analysis.

Practical implications

The outcomes of the paper might be useful both for perspective entrepreneurs, who are considering crowdfunding to finance their projects, and for platforms in order to shape systems and services towards enhancing campaign success.

Originality/value

Although there are existing studies on crowdfunding success factors and applications of crowdfunding as a tool, no previous study specifically investigates the use of crowdfunding in Italian real estate by analysing success factors.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2021

Martina Topić

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the social debate on women, health and smoking in the New York Times from 1870 until 1929. The paper aimed to establish whether…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the social debate on women, health and smoking in the New York Times from 1870 until 1929. The paper aimed to establish whether smoking for women was a form of oppression and whether it was publicly known that smoking is harmful in decades preceding the “Torches of Freedom” campaign run by Edward L. Bernays. This criticism for engineering women’s smoking, and thus harming women’s health up to today causes harm to the reputation of the public relations (PR) industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Articles were analysed per decade and a total of 294 articles from the New York Times was analysed. The coverage was analysed using two themes, smoking and health and women and smoking and discourse analysis have been carried out on articles in these themes to explore what was known of smoking and whether the social perception of women smoking was oppressive and could be seen as a woman’s issue that “Torches of Freedom” addressed.

Findings

Findings show that it was not known that cigarettes were harmful to health and that smoking can be seen as constituting part of women’s oppression in the US before the “Torches of Freedom” campaign. The oppression of women who smoked intensified during the 1920s and Bernays’ Torches of Freedom campaign directly addressed an existing social issue rather than engineering a campaign and manipulating women to start smoking.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the revolutionary potential in Bernays’ campaign. This could inspire researchers and consumers to keep on critically reflecting on PR campaigns while still appreciating any progressive agenda they might contribute to. Simultaneously, PR practitioners may take away from the article that a message of social relevance may just be more memorable than the advertised brand itself.

Originality/value

This paper engages with the coverage of the New York Times, a newspaper that is often mentioned in the context of the “Torches of Freedom” campaign success and explores in detail what the debate on smoking, health and women were in nearly 60 years preceding the much-criticised campaign.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 13 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Ben J. Smith, Adrian E. Bauman, Jeanie McKenzie and Margaret Thomas

To examine whether awareness of the source of sun protection campaigns in New South Wales, Australia was associated with message recall and sun protection knowledge and behaviours.

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Abstract

Purpose

To examine whether awareness of the source of sun protection campaigns in New South Wales, Australia was associated with message recall and sun protection knowledge and behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

Telephone surveys of random samples (n=800) of parents and other carers of children under 12 years of age were conducted before and after the first two campaigns and after the third campaign.

Findings

Recognition of the NSW Cancer Council (NSWCC) as the message source increased after each campaign. Cross‐sectional analyses revealed that after the first and third campaigns those who could identify the NSWCC were 1.4‐1.7 times more likely than those who could not to demonstrate knowledge about child sun protection practices (p<0.05). After the first campaign those with accurate message source awareness were 1.4 times more likely to report using sunscreen or clothing to protect their children, while after campaign three this awareness was associated with a greater likelihood (OR 1.6, p<0.05) of using hats, sunscreen and protective clothing.

Research limitations/implications

While causality cannot be determined using a cross‐sectional design, the use of serial population surveys to analyse the relationship between message source awareness and sun protection knowledge and behaviours strengthens the basis for examining the role of this factor.

Practical implications

Presenting a readily identifiable and credible message source is likely to enhance the impact of health campaigns and this factor should be given attention in the pre‐testing of communications.

Originality/value

The importance of a credible communication source has been postulated by various theorists, but this one of few studies to examine the role played this factor in a population‐wide, health promotion campaign.

Details

Health Education, vol. 105 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Elisa Juholin

This study examined reasons why Elisabeth Rehn – labelled by the media as the queen of the polls – lost her lead position a month before the presidential election. Rehn’s…

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1083

Abstract

This study examined reasons why Elisabeth Rehn – labelled by the media as the queen of the polls – lost her lead position a month before the presidential election. Rehn’s campaign had two approaches – traditional and marketing oriented. On one hand it represented a voter‐driven campaign with various non‐political and political professionals at its disposal but on the other hand the candidate was closer to the traditional party‐driven or ideology‐driven concept holding to traditional political themes. The main internal weaknesses of Rehn’s campaign were four factors: the weakness of the (civic) organisation, the lack of resources, the candidate’s credibility problems and the wrong themes. The relevant external factors were: the line‐up of the candidates with two strong right‐wing female candidates and overwhelming resources of the competitive organisations. The study provides evidence that most of the theoretical factors based on previous research to be relevant also in this campaign and emphasises the meaning of the candidate’s credibility. The indicators of the credibility were her competence and appearance (external credibility), and personality and commitment (internal credibility) even though in the very beginning the candidate was evaluated by the campaign workers as the most competent and experienced candidate. The polls and the media were considered to be factors that strengthened the result more than created it.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2012

Greg Kerr, Kate Dombkins and Sarah Jelley

A number of places have used the “I love” or “we love” tagline or slogan to promote their place, with the “I love New York” (using the heart symbol) possibly being the…

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494

Abstract

Purpose

A number of places have used the “I love” or “we love” tagline or slogan to promote their place, with the “I love New York” (using the heart symbol) possibly being the most familiar. Other places have used similar campaigns which can often be observed by the sale of merchandise from souvenir shops. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the “We love the Gong” campaign relative to the city of Wollongong, Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

After providing a background to the city of Wollongong and a brief explanation as to the meaning and use of slogans, an investigation of the campaign was undertaken by interviewing the person responsible for the campaign. Where appropriate, the explanations provided are supported by reference to local media reports and relevant literature.

Findings

It was found that the Wollongong campaign was more than a merchandising exercise. The campaign was a reaction to place identity and place image problems and was underpinned by research and a consequent marketing plan. The campaign was adequately resourced, professionally implemented, and research to monitor its effectiveness was undertaken.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the application of management and marketing principles to places by providing details of the campaign and lessons learnt from a review of its implementation.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2021

James Richards and Vaughan Ellis

A retrospective action-research case study of one branch of the University and College Union (UCU) is used to show how threshold requirements of the Act can be…

Abstract

Purpose

A retrospective action-research case study of one branch of the University and College Union (UCU) is used to show how threshold requirements of the Act can be systematically beaten.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper responds to calls for “best practice” on how trade unions may react to member voting threshold requirements of the Trade Union Act 2016 (the Act). A broader aim is to make a theoretical contribution related to trade union organising and tactics in “get the vote out” (GTVO) industrial action organising campaigns.

Findings

Findings are presented as a lead organiser's first-hand account of a successful GTVO campaign contextualised in relation to theories of organising. The findings offer “best practice” for union organisers required to beat the Act's voting thresholds and also contribute to theories surrounding trade union organising tactics.

Research limitations/implications

Further development and adaptation of the proposed model may be required when applied to larger bargaining units and different organising contexts.

Practical implications

The findings can inform the organising practices/tactics of trade unions in relation to statutory ballots. The findings also allow Human Resource (HR) practitioners to reflect on their approach to dealing with unions capable of mounting successful GTVO campaigns.

Social implications

The findings have the potential to collectively empower workers, via their trade unions, to defend and further their interests in a post-financial crisis context and in the shadow of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Originality/value

This is the first known empirical account of organising to exceed voting thresholds of the Act, providing practical steps for union organisers in planning for statutory ballots. Further value lies in the paper's use of a novel first-hand account of a GTVO campaign, offering a new and first, theoretical model of organising tactics to beat the Act.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Valentina Ndou, Paola Scorrano, Gioconda Mele and Pasquale Stefanizzi

The wide development of digital platforms permitted the birth of new financing modalities, namely, crowdfunding, where the crowd of individuals and investors can supply…

Abstract

Purpose

The wide development of digital platforms permitted the birth of new financing modalities, namely, crowdfunding, where the crowd of individuals and investors can supply the necessary financial resources for venture creation and growth. While the extant literature has focused on analyzing the dynamics and features of crowdfunding campaigns, few studies have focused on understanding how crowd investors decide which ventures to invest in and which factors influence their decision-making process. Due to this gap, the purpose of this paper is to analyze the factors influencing the choice to invest in an equity crowdfunding campaign, by defining a set of indicators useful to evaluate the risk of the campaign.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical research study of Italian equity crowdfunding campaigns has been conducted to identify quantitative indicators useful for evaluating the risk in a crowdfunding campaign.

Findings

Findings demonstrate that the risk indicators proposed to represent important gauges that investors can usefully consider ex ante to assess the degree of riskiness of the investment in the equity crowdfunding campaign.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the study regarding the size of the sample that is small due to the necessity to extract enough information in pre and post-equity campaigns. Also, the lack of historical data is another limitation.

Originality/value

The originality of the studies relies on the proposal of quantitative indicators for the evaluation of the risk in equity crowdfunding campaigns for “crowd” investors to reduce information asymmetries.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Monica Rossolini, Alessia Pedrazzoli and Alessandro Ronconi

Recognising the growing importance of environmental and sustainable activities and the role of communication strategies in soliciting their financing, this work…

Abstract

Purpose

Recognising the growing importance of environmental and sustainable activities and the role of communication strategies in soliciting their financing, this work investigates the influence of message framing, green emphasis and quantitative information on the probability of green crowdfunding campaigns' success.

Design/methodology/approach

This analysis is based on crowdfunding campaigns published between 2015 and 2020 on the Indiegogo platform in the category “Community projects – Environment”. The study develops an in-depth qualitative content analysis of the projects before performing an empirical examination to determine funding causes.

Findings

Communication strategies (message framing, green emphasis and quantitative goals) affect funding success. However, project category moderates the impact of message framing and green emphasis on campaign success. While positive framing increases agri-food campaign success, negative framing is more effective for clean energy and climate preservation projects. Moreover, indication of a quantitative goal and a marked green emphasis in a project's presentation increase campaign success, but a too marked green emphasis is only effective for agri-food projects.

Practical implications

Green entrepreneurs and campaign managers must work carefully on their projects' communication, accounting for the type of product proposed, emphasising green components in its description and utilising quantitative information to present future goals. These strategies maximise backers' responses and enable entrepreneurs to obtain funding. The authors’ findings may be extended to other contexts, including the banking sector, to craft effective communication strategies for green financial products.

Originality/value

By applying framing theory in a new context (i.e. the online financing of green entrepreneurs), this study identifies new campaign success determinants and provides evidence for the moderating role of project category. Furthermore, the study highlights the need to develop different communication strategies for social and environmental-oriented projects.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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