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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Ian Wilson

This article begins with a reprint of interviews from the November/December 1995 issue of Planning Review (the previous identity of Strategy & Leadership.). In those…

Abstract

This article begins with a reprint of interviews from the November/December 1995 issue of Planning Review (the previous identity of Strategy & Leadership.). In those interviews, four leading futurists — Ian Wilson, Oliver Markley, Joseph Coates, and Clement Bezold — discussed the critical issues they believed were facing business leaders in the first decade of the twenty‐first century, the strategic implications of these issues, and how business leaders should respond. Their original remarks are followed by their current thoughts about what progress has been made in five years and how the critical issues may have changed in that time.

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Strategy & Leadership, vol. 27 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Ian Wilson

This paper forms part of a presentation on the same subject given by the author to the Basel II conference organised by the Securities Institute in London during March…

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1358

Abstract

This paper forms part of a presentation on the same subject given by the author to the Basel II conference organised by the Securities Institute in London during March 2004. It is a case study based on the author’s experience in Barclays Bank on the preparations required for successful implementation of the new Basel II Accord. First it considers changes to regulatory capital, and then goes on to examine the main challenges that lie ahead and, finally, the advantages and disadvantages of adopting one of the internal ratings‐based approaches. The views and opinions expressed in this paper are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of the Barclays Group.

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Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Ian Wilson

The insights gained from scenarios will be wasted unless companies effectively integrate them into the decision‐making process.

Abstract

The insights gained from scenarios will be wasted unless companies effectively integrate them into the decision‐making process.

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Planning Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2009

Ian Wilson

The new concept ‘iconic biography’ (IB) is explained. Its impact on managers who aspire to lead their organisations to outstanding performance is described using…

Abstract

The new concept ‘iconic biography’ (IB) is explained. Its impact on managers who aspire to lead their organisations to outstanding performance is described using contrasting examples from the public sector. The relationship between a leader's IB and their ability to influence organisational ethos and culture is also described with survey evidence as to the impact on staff attitudes and morale.

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International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Ian Wilson

The author outlines a “new rules” agenda for business that is being driven by changing market forces and growing public expectations. The new rules address seven primary…

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5495

Abstract

The author outlines a “new rules” agenda for business that is being driven by changing market forces and growing public expectations. The new rules address seven primary issues: corporate legitimacy and stakeholder relations, corporate governance, increased equity and diversity, environmental preservation, the new “employment contract,” redefined public‐private sector relations, and improved ethical performance. The new rules are evolving not only from the demands of public interest groups; they also represent arenas of action already being taken by leading corporations. Thus, social responsibility has moved far beyond peripheral “do‐goodism” and entered the central sphere of corporate strategy.

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Strategy & Leadership, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Ian H. Wilson

Times change and, with them, our approaches to strategy and its execution. In the 1970s, strategic planning was the corporate mantra in most companies. But as we moved…

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1220

Abstract

Times change and, with them, our approaches to strategy and its execution. In the 1970s, strategic planning was the corporate mantra in most companies. But as we moved into a new decade, strategic planning was tarred with the brush of “failure to implement.” In the 1980s, the corporate and consulting world was a‐buzz with strategic management—the new and improved version of setting direction and creating shareholder wealth. Now, in the 1990s, the focus is strategic leadership.

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Strategy & Leadership, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Ian Wilson

In the post‐Enron/WorldCom/Tyco environment of public distrust and tightening regulation, corporations must proactively work to regain public trust. In this skeptical…

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1434

Abstract

In the post‐Enron/WorldCom/Tyco environment of public distrust and tightening regulation, corporations must proactively work to regain public trust. In this skeptical environment, they must do more to reflect the fact that corporate legitimacy depends on public acceptance. The new wave of legislation and regulation can achieve only limited results. What is needed is a more radical rethinking, by corporations themselves, of their true role and purpose in society. Restating corporate purpose in terms of social needs rather than solely of maximizing profit is the surest way to be distinguished from the competition, to regain public trust, and to ultimately increase stakeholder (not merely shareowner) value. To ensure the success of this reformation the agenda for executive action must address five key points: (1) develop consensus on a revised statement of corporate purpose and values; (2) clarify the role of profit in the business equation; (3) articulate and communicate the distinctions between the old purpose, values and behaviors and the new; (4) set a strong personal example; and (5) revise the management measurement and reward system.

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Strategy & Leadership, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Gigih Udi Atmo, Colin Duffield, Lihai Zhang and David Ian Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the outcomes of Indonesian power projects as representative projects of Asian emerging economies that were procured via…

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1324

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the outcomes of Indonesian power projects as representative projects of Asian emerging economies that were procured via public-private partnerships (PPPs) and traditional public sector procurement. Power generation infrastructure delivery in emerging economies frequently seeks private participation via PPPs as one of the key mechanisms to attract private finance. Undertaking a comparative benchmark study of the outcomes of Indonesian power projects provides an opportunity to explore the historic evidence as to whether PPPs deliver better outcomes than traditional public procurement in emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on a study of the performance of 56 Indonesian power projects procured via either PPPs or traditional procurement. First, it focusses on project time and cost outcomes of power plant facility during construction and commissioning and then extends this comparison to consider the operating availability of power plants during their first two years of operation.

Findings

The results indicate that PPP projects had superior time and operating availability to those procured traditionally whereas no significant differences were identified in the cost performance between PPPs and traditionally procured projects. These findings highlight the importance of adopting policies that are supported by broader sources of international financiers and high quality power plant developers.

Research limitations/implications

The quality performance analyses of projects (based on equivalent available factor indices) were limited to the power plants in the Java-Bali region where the majority of projects are large scale power plants.

Practical implications

This study provides an empirical basis for governments of emerging economies to select the most beneficial procurement strategy for power plant projects. It highlights the importance of selecting experienced providers and to adopt policies that attract high quality international project financiers and power plant developers. This includes the need to ensure the commercial viability of projects and to seriously consider the use of cleaner power technologies.

Originality/value

This study is the first to compare the outcomes of power projects in Asian emerging economies delivered via PPPs against those delivered by traditional public procurement that includes consideration of the quality of the delivered product.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

RICHARD E. BARRY

It is the rage in the literature today for archivists and records managers to address the issue of recordkeeping in The New Millennium. It is an idea that must be worthy…

Abstract

It is the rage in the literature today for archivists and records managers to address the issue of recordkeeping in The New Millennium. It is an idea that must be worthy of its own acronym, TNM. It has a nice, seductive ring to it that gives one the sense of joining the ranks of the pundits and visionaries. This author has succumbed like all of the others. And I know I'll do it again — soon. I can't wait. At my age, when one begins to get the idea that it might be the last chance one will have to talk about a TNM, it is downright irresistible. One has to bleed it for all it is worth.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Bill Ralston

Corporations need a structure for thinking through the development of a new energy/environment strategy and the business implications of different strategy alternatives

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2027

Abstract

Purpose

Corporations need a structure for thinking through the development of a new energy/environment strategy and the business implications of different strategy alternatives. This paper aims to investigate how to develop a customized corporate energy strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This four‐step process focuses on the major energy/environment issues requiring corporate decisions; it generates two alternate scenarios of the future that span the possibilities and identifies basic policy choices for corporations and also the tradeoffs to be made.

Findings

The paper finds that this process to develop a new energy strategy addresses the prospects that the way an organization manages its energy and environmental threats and opportunities over the next 15 years could invigorate or cripple it. The four major drivers of uncertainty for the future: the dynamics of energy supply and demand, global warming effects, society's environmental‐mitigation and remediation priorities, and world economic development outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

Bill Ralston is the co‐author of the best‐practice guide The Scenario Planning Handbook (with Ian Wilson).

Practical implications

The four‐step process outlined here provides corporate executives the practical means to interpret the global forces buffeting them, to identify new pathways for creating value in the future and to get started.

Originality/value

This process to develop a new energy strategy evaluates the prospects that the way an organization manages its energy and environmental threats and opportunities over the next 15 years could invigorate or cripple it.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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