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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2020

Huong Le, Zhou Jiang and Katrina Radford

This study examines employees' metacognitive cultural intelligence as a moderator in the relationship between leader-member exchange (LMX) and employees' subjective well-being.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines employees' metacognitive cultural intelligence as a moderator in the relationship between leader-member exchange (LMX) and employees' subjective well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

We tested the conceptual model using regression analysis from a sample of 462 migrant workers in Australia.

Findings

The results demonstrated that employees' metacognitive cultural intelligence moderated the relationship between LMX and employees' subjective well-being in such a way that the effect was stronger among those employees with lower levels of metacognitive cultural intelligence.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design, with self-reporting at one point in time, could affect a causal relationship among variables, although each relationship was built on strong theoretical perspectives. However, prior research emphasizes that a single source is not considered to be an issue when interactions are examined.

Practical implications

One way to improve metacognitive cultural intelligence for global leadership effectiveness could be through the introduction of diversity and cross-cultural training, such as didactic programs provided either in-house or by external institutions.

Originality/value

Drawing on Conservation of Resources theory, this paper contributes to the literature by demonstrating that employees' metacognitive cultural intelligence is a boundary condition that alters the strengths of the LMX–subjective well-being relationship.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 May 2018

Huong Le, Zhou Jiang, Yuka Fujimoto and Ingrid Nielsen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating roles of procedural justice and distributive justice in the organizational inclusion-affective well-being relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating roles of procedural justice and distributive justice in the organizational inclusion-affective well-being relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 253 Australian employees using an online survey. The study used confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling to analyze the data.

Findings

Organizational inclusion was positively related to both distributive justice and procedural justice. The relationship between organizational inclusion and affective well-being was mediated by both distributive justice and procedural justice.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design may have limited the empirical inferences; however, the proposed model was based on robust theoretical contentions, thus mitigating the limitation of the design. Data were collected from a single organization, thus limiting generalizability.

Practical implications

Implementation of inclusion training activities at organizational, group, and individual levels is important to enhance perceptions of organizational inclusion and subsequently improve employee affective well-being.

Originality/value

Based on the group engagement model and group-value model of justice, this paper adds to the literature by demonstrating two mediating mechanisms driving the organizational inclusion-affective well-being relationship.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Huong Le and Jade McKay

The purpose of this paper is to examine the voice of Chinese and Vietnamese international students through studying the similarities and differences in their learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the voice of Chinese and Vietnamese international students through studying the similarities and differences in their learning experiences and the reasons underlying their experience.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 57 Chinese and Vietnamese international students participated in focus groups and interviews regarding their experiences of higher education and their suggestions for improvement.

Findings

The findings show that Chinese and Vietnamese students had varying levels of challenges and different progress in the adaptation process and that Chinese students were more vocal and less satisfied with their experience of higher education than Vietnamese students. This is due to the mismatch in their expectation and the actual experience and the cultural influence.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is relatively small. This study only looked at Vietnamese and Chinese students in one university, which might have limitations in relation to subjectivity and bias.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful implications for educators, institutional leaders and support staff to improve facilities, teaching quality and service to students.

Originality/value

In the current era of internationalisation, commercialisation and mobility in institutions around the world, this study advances current research and provides timely insight into the experiential differences of the Chinese and Vietnamese student experience and their voice.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2020

Huong Le, Catrina Palmer Johnson and Yuka Fujimoto

This article examines a climate for inclusion through the lens of organizational justice. We argue that open interpersonal contacts, the fair treatment of gender-diverse…

1594

Abstract

Purpose

This article examines a climate for inclusion through the lens of organizational justice. We argue that open interpersonal contacts, the fair treatment of gender-diverse employees, and inclusive decision-making processes in the promotion of equitable employment practices are foundational for shaping the climate for inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected from multi sources: focus groups with female employees (N = 20) and interviews with male and female managers (N = 8).

Findings

In examining the similarities and differences between employees' and managers' perspectives, the findings revealed that, in all dimensions of a climate for inclusion, employees had more negative justice concerns than did managers, while managers and employees had similar views on some aspects of employment practices.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted within one university setting; therefore, the findings may not be applicable to other industries.

Practical implications

This study offers managerial implications that can be developed to promote the climate for inclusion in organizations.

Social implications

In order to create a fair and equitable workplace, all employees should be able to actively participate in decision-making processes and share suggestions for contextualized and fair employment practices.

Originality/value

Drawing the group-value model, this study advocates the importance of justice-based organizational practices in building an inclusive organization.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Le Huong, Fung Kuen Koo, Rodney Arambewela and Ambika Zutshi

The purpose of this paper is to examine Vietnamese international students’ experiences with the campus learning environment by analysing differences in staff and student…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine Vietnamese international students’ experiences with the campus learning environment by analysing differences in staff and student perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Two focus groups (n=12) and ten in-depth interviews were conducted with Vietnamese students and four in-depth interviews with the university staff (totalling 26).

Findings

The findings show a greater divergence of views between students and staff on teaching and learning than English language proficiency and student support services. These key differences were influenced by students’ prior expectations of their learning environment in Vietnam.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to one group of international students and to one Australian university.

Practical implications

The lecturers/administrators must have a good understanding of international students’ learning backgrounds and expectations to enhance their positive experience; appropriate teaching skills and practices are essential for teachers to meet the current needs of students. More effective training for international students to understand the multicultural nature of Australia is also essential.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by identifying the experience of Vietnamese international students in a western university, which is, a relatively under-researched nationality compared to other Asian nationalities such as Chinese and Indian.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Le Huong, Connie Zheng and Yuka Fujimoto

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between employee perceived well-being and the four dimensions of organisational justice, namely, procedural…

4422

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between employee perceived well-being and the four dimensions of organisational justice, namely, procedural, distributive, interpersonal and informational justice, and how dimensions of organisational justice affect employee well-being in the Australian tourism industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample is selected from employees who work in the tourism industry in Australia, and the survey was conducted online (n=121). Factor analysis is used to identify key items related to perceived organisational justice, followed by multiple regression analysis to assess the magnitude and strength of impacts of different dimensions of organisational justice on employee well-being.

Findings

The results support the established view that organisational justice is associated with employee well-being. Specifically, informational justice has the strongest influence on tourism employee well-being, followed by procedural justice, interpersonal justice and distributive justice.

Research limitations/implications

The authors acknowledge key limitations in the study such as a relatively small sample size and gender imbalance in the sample.

Practical implications

The authors provide strategies for managers to increase levels of organisational justice in the tourism sector such as workgroup interactions, a consultation process, team culture and social support.

Originality/value

This study builds on limited literature in the area of inclusion and organisational justice in tourism organisations. The study provides a new path to effective organisational management within the context of a diverse workforce, adding to the current debate on which dimensions of organisational justice contribute to improving employee well-being.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Huong Le and Andros Gregoriou

This paper aims to empirically examine the relationship between stock liquidity and asset pricing, using a new price impact ratio adjusted for free float as the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to empirically examine the relationship between stock liquidity and asset pricing, using a new price impact ratio adjusted for free float as the approximation of liquidity. The free-float-adjusted ratio is free from size bias and encapsulates the impact of trading frequency. It is more comprehensive than alternative price impact ratios because it incorporates the shares available to the public for trading.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors are using univariate and multivariate econometric methods to test the significance of a newly created price impact ratio. The authors are using secondary data and asset pricing models in their analysis. The authors use a data sample of all US listed companies over the period of 1997–2017.

Findings

The authors provide evidence that the free-float-adjusted price impact ratio is superior to all price impact ratios used in the previous academic literature. The authors also discover that their findings are robust to the financial crises between 2007 and 2009.

Originality/value

This is the first comprehensive study on a newly established price impact ratio. The authors show the significance of this ratio and explain why it is superior to all previous price impact ratios, established in prior research.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2020

Muhammad Asif Khan, Asima Siddique, Zahid Sarwar, Le Thi Minh Huong and Qaiser Nadeem

The purpose of this study is to investigate the interaction effect of commercial loans in between trade Credit, retain earning, and entrepreneurial small and medium…

1506

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the interaction effect of commercial loans in between trade Credit, retain earning, and entrepreneurial small and medium enterprises (SMEs) performance.

Design/methodology/approach

In this research, the cross-sectional research design was used, and data were collected from 362 SMEs located in Pakistan by using a questionnaire. Correlation and regression analysis was adopted to establish the interaction effect of commercial loans in between trade credits, retain earning and entrepreneurial SMEs performance.

Findings

The results demonstrated that commercial loans, trade credit and retain earning have a positive relationship with entrepreneurial SMEs performance. The findings also confirmed the interaction effect of commercial loans in between retain earnings, trade credit and entrepreneurial SMEs performance.

Originality/value

The study examined the association and interaction effect of commercial loans in between retain earnings, trade credit and SMEs performance in the emerging state (Pakistan). So, this is the first time to study the relationship between these variables, which highly contributes to entrepreneurial SMEs literature.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2071-1395

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2022

Yakub Kayode Saheed, Usman Ahmad Baba and Mustafa Ayobami Raji

Purpose: This chapter aims to examine machine learning (ML) models for predicting credit card fraud (CCF).Need for the study: With the advance of technology, the world is…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter aims to examine machine learning (ML) models for predicting credit card fraud (CCF).

Need for the study: With the advance of technology, the world is increasingly relying on credit cards rather than cash in daily life. This creates a slew of new opportunities for fraudulent individuals to abuse these cards. As of December 2020, global card losses reached $28.65billion, up 2.9% from $27.85 billion in 2018, according to the Nilson 2019 research. To safeguard the safety of credit card users, the credit card issuer should include a service that protects customers from potential risks. CCF has become a severe threat as internet buying has grown. To this goal, various studies in the field of automatic and real-time fraud detection are required. Due to their advantageous properties, the most recent ones employ a variety of ML algorithms and techniques to construct a well-fitting model to detect fraudulent transactions. When it comes to recognising credit card risk is huge and high-dimensional data, feature selection (FS) is critical for improving classification accuracy and fraud detection.

Methodology/design/approach: The objectives of this chapter are to construct a new model for credit card fraud detection (CCFD) based on principal component analysis (PCA) for FS and using supervised ML techniques such as K-nearest neighbour (KNN), ridge classifier, gradient boosting, quadratic discriminant analysis, AdaBoost, and random forest for classification of fraudulent and legitimate transactions. When compared to earlier experiments, the suggested approach demonstrates a high capacity for detecting fraudulent transactions. To be more precise, our model’s resilience is constructed by integrating the power of PCA for determining the most useful predictive features. The experimental analysis was performed on German credit card and Taiwan credit card data sets.

Findings: The experimental findings revealed that the KNN achieved an accuracy of 96.29%, recall of 100%, and precision of 96.29%, which is the best performing model on the German data set. While the ridge classifier was the best performing model on Taiwan Credit data with an accuracy of 81.75%, recall of 34.89, and precision of 66.61%.

Practical implications: The poor performance of the models on the Taiwan data revealed that it is an imbalanced credit card data set. The comparison of our proposed models with state-of-the-art credit card ML models showed that our results were competitive.

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Huong Le, Bridget Jones, Tandi Williams and Sara Dolnicar

The purpose of this paper is to provide novel insights into arts consumption behaviour and patterns of communication displayed by arts consumers using Peterson’s…

1433

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide novel insights into arts consumption behaviour and patterns of communication displayed by arts consumers using Peterson’s theoretical framework, and to identify differences in the use of communication channels across arts segments.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an a priori market segmentation study, with two variables serving as segmentation criteria, namely, the frequency of and the variety of arts events attended. The authors tested for differences in communication patterns.

Findings

Four segments were created: low-frequency univores, low-frequency multivores, high-frequency multivores and high-frequency omnivores. They differ in their communication patterns and online behaviours, including their online activities before and after attending arts events. Printed materials and e-mail newsletters were the most effective communication channel for raising awareness of all arts consumers.

Research limitations/implications

Understanding these communication patterns can help arts marketers to increase the attendance of low-frequency segments and broaden the variety of arts events attended by the univore and multivore segments. The generalisability of the findings is limited as the survey was conducted among online Australian arts consumers only.

Originality/value

The paper adds the dimension of arts consumption frequency to the taxonomy of omnivores and univores proposed by Peterson, which is based on the variety of consumed arts only. The paper contributes to communication and arts marketing literature by identifying key differences in communication patterns across segments of arts consumers and the most promising communication channels to engage them.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

1 – 10 of 91