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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2020

Huong Le, Zhou Jiang and Katrina Radford

This study examines employees' metacognitive cultural intelligence as a moderator in the relationship between leader-member exchange (LMX) and employees' subjective well-being.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study examines employees' metacognitive cultural intelligence as a moderator in the relationship between leader-member exchange (LMX) and employees' subjective well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

We tested the conceptual model using regression analysis from a sample of 462 migrant workers in Australia.

Findings

The results demonstrated that employees' metacognitive cultural intelligence moderated the relationship between LMX and employees' subjective well-being in such a way that the effect was stronger among those employees with lower levels of metacognitive cultural intelligence.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design, with self-reporting at one point in time, could affect a causal relationship among variables, although each relationship was built on strong theoretical perspectives. However, prior research emphasizes that a single source is not considered to be an issue when interactions are examined.

Practical implications

One way to improve metacognitive cultural intelligence for global leadership effectiveness could be through the introduction of diversity and cross-cultural training, such as didactic programs provided either in-house or by external institutions.

Originality/value

Drawing on Conservation of Resources theory, this paper contributes to the literature by demonstrating that employees' metacognitive cultural intelligence is a boundary condition that alters the strengths of the LMX–subjective well-being relationship.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 May 2018

Huong Le, Zhou Jiang, Yuka Fujimoto and Ingrid Nielsen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating roles of procedural justice and distributive justice in the organizational inclusion-affective well-being relationship.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating roles of procedural justice and distributive justice in the organizational inclusion-affective well-being relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 253 Australian employees using an online survey. The study used confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling to analyze the data.

Findings

Organizational inclusion was positively related to both distributive justice and procedural justice. The relationship between organizational inclusion and affective well-being was mediated by both distributive justice and procedural justice.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design may have limited the empirical inferences; however, the proposed model was based on robust theoretical contentions, thus mitigating the limitation of the design. Data were collected from a single organization, thus limiting generalizability.

Practical implications

Implementation of inclusion training activities at organizational, group, and individual levels is important to enhance perceptions of organizational inclusion and subsequently improve employee affective well-being.

Originality/value

Based on the group engagement model and group-value model of justice, this paper adds to the literature by demonstrating two mediating mechanisms driving the organizational inclusion-affective well-being relationship.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2024

Binh Huu Nguyen and Huong Nguyen Quynh Le

This study aims to investigate the moderating role of sociodemographic factors, specifically age and education level, in the knowledge-attitude-behavior (KAB) model concerning…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the moderating role of sociodemographic factors, specifically age and education level, in the knowledge-attitude-behavior (KAB) model concerning information security awareness (ISA) amid growing technological threats.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a survey methodology, collecting data from 400 working individuals in Vietnam, to test the applicability of the KAB model and evaluate the moderating effects of age and education on the model’s established relationships. In addition, the theoretical model and hypotheses were evaluated using the partial least squares structural equation model (PLS-SEM) approach.

Findings

This research confirms the relationships posited in the KAB model. Notably, it shows that younger employees showcase a more positive attitude and behavior toward information security compared with their older counterparts. In addition, higher education levels strengthen the positive association between information security knowledge and attitude. The findings underscore the imperative for organizations to consider sociodemographic variables when formulating strategies to enhance ISA.

Originality/value

This study extends the KAB model by exploring the impact of sociodemographic factors, focusing on age and education in ISA. Overcoming the oversight in current literature, particularly in the context of technological threats, the research uses PLS-SEM and targets a specific demographic in Vietnam.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Huong Le and Jade McKay

The purpose of this paper is to examine the voice of Chinese and Vietnamese international students through studying the similarities and differences in their learning experiences…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the voice of Chinese and Vietnamese international students through studying the similarities and differences in their learning experiences and the reasons underlying their experience.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 57 Chinese and Vietnamese international students participated in focus groups and interviews regarding their experiences of higher education and their suggestions for improvement.

Findings

The findings show that Chinese and Vietnamese students had varying levels of challenges and different progress in the adaptation process and that Chinese students were more vocal and less satisfied with their experience of higher education than Vietnamese students. This is due to the mismatch in their expectation and the actual experience and the cultural influence.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is relatively small. This study only looked at Vietnamese and Chinese students in one university, which might have limitations in relation to subjectivity and bias.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful implications for educators, institutional leaders and support staff to improve facilities, teaching quality and service to students.

Originality/value

In the current era of internationalisation, commercialisation and mobility in institutions around the world, this study advances current research and provides timely insight into the experiential differences of the Chinese and Vietnamese student experience and their voice.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2020

Huong Le, Catrina Palmer Johnson and Yuka Fujimoto

This article examines a climate for inclusion through the lens of organizational justice. We argue that open interpersonal contacts, the fair treatment of gender-diverse…

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Abstract

Purpose

This article examines a climate for inclusion through the lens of organizational justice. We argue that open interpersonal contacts, the fair treatment of gender-diverse employees, and inclusive decision-making processes in the promotion of equitable employment practices are foundational for shaping the climate for inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected from multi sources: focus groups with female employees (N = 20) and interviews with male and female managers (N = 8).

Findings

In examining the similarities and differences between employees' and managers' perspectives, the findings revealed that, in all dimensions of a climate for inclusion, employees had more negative justice concerns than did managers, while managers and employees had similar views on some aspects of employment practices.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted within one university setting; therefore, the findings may not be applicable to other industries.

Practical implications

This study offers managerial implications that can be developed to promote the climate for inclusion in organizations.

Social implications

In order to create a fair and equitable workplace, all employees should be able to actively participate in decision-making processes and share suggestions for contextualized and fair employment practices.

Originality/value

Drawing the group-value model, this study advocates the importance of justice-based organizational practices in building an inclusive organization.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2022

Huong Le, Joohan Lee, Ingrid Nielsen and Thi Lan Anh Nguyen

This paper examines the factors that influence the work attitudes of employees and the conditional effects of family support on the job demand–turnover intention relationship.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the factors that influence the work attitudes of employees and the conditional effects of family support on the job demand–turnover intention relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a sample of 231 employees working in the manufacturing industry in Vietnam to test the conceptual model.

Findings

Drawing upon the job demands-resources (JD-R) model and job embeddedness theory, the authors found that employees' psychological capital and family support influenced turnover intentions through enhancing their job satisfaction. The authors also found that the influence of job demands on turnover intentions was altered when employees had higher levels of family support.

Originality/value

This study provides important insights for human resource managers regarding what may influence employees' job satisfaction and turnover intentions. The findings advance turnover literature by highlighting the important roles of both internal resources (psychological capital) and external resources (family support) in influencing employee turnover intentions in Vietnam.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 52 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Le Huong, Fung Kuen Koo, Rodney Arambewela and Ambika Zutshi

The purpose of this paper is to examine Vietnamese international students’ experiences with the campus learning environment by analysing differences in staff and student…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine Vietnamese international students’ experiences with the campus learning environment by analysing differences in staff and student perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Two focus groups (n=12) and ten in-depth interviews were conducted with Vietnamese students and four in-depth interviews with the university staff (totalling 26).

Findings

The findings show a greater divergence of views between students and staff on teaching and learning than English language proficiency and student support services. These key differences were influenced by students’ prior expectations of their learning environment in Vietnam.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to one group of international students and to one Australian university.

Practical implications

The lecturers/administrators must have a good understanding of international students’ learning backgrounds and expectations to enhance their positive experience; appropriate teaching skills and practices are essential for teachers to meet the current needs of students. More effective training for international students to understand the multicultural nature of Australia is also essential.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by identifying the experience of Vietnamese international students in a western university, which is, a relatively under-researched nationality compared to other Asian nationalities such as Chinese and Indian.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Le Huong, Connie Zheng and Yuka Fujimoto

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between employee perceived well-being and the four dimensions of organisational justice, namely, procedural, distributive…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between employee perceived well-being and the four dimensions of organisational justice, namely, procedural, distributive, interpersonal and informational justice, and how dimensions of organisational justice affect employee well-being in the Australian tourism industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample is selected from employees who work in the tourism industry in Australia, and the survey was conducted online (n=121). Factor analysis is used to identify key items related to perceived organisational justice, followed by multiple regression analysis to assess the magnitude and strength of impacts of different dimensions of organisational justice on employee well-being.

Findings

The results support the established view that organisational justice is associated with employee well-being. Specifically, informational justice has the strongest influence on tourism employee well-being, followed by procedural justice, interpersonal justice and distributive justice.

Research limitations/implications

The authors acknowledge key limitations in the study such as a relatively small sample size and gender imbalance in the sample.

Practical implications

The authors provide strategies for managers to increase levels of organisational justice in the tourism sector such as workgroup interactions, a consultation process, team culture and social support.

Originality/value

This study builds on limited literature in the area of inclusion and organisational justice in tourism organisations. The study provides a new path to effective organisational management within the context of a diverse workforce, adding to the current debate on which dimensions of organisational justice contribute to improving employee well-being.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 February 2023

Danh Vinh Le, Huong Thi Thu Le, Thanh Tien Pham and Lai Van Vo

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of innovation on the performance of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Vietnam.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of innovation on the performance of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses data from the surveys on SMEs in Vietnam conducted by the Development Economics Research Group at the University of Copenhagen, the United Nations University’s World Institute for Development Economics Research, Central Institute for Economic Management and Institute of Labor Science and Social Affairs, and applies least squared regressions and 2SLS regressions to examine the effect of innovation on the performance of SMEs.

Findings

The authors find that SMEs with innovation tend to perform better than SMEs without innovation. The authors further show that the positive effect of innovation on firm performance mainly comes from the effect of improvement of existing products, an important type of innovation in SMEs. This result is persistent when the authors use propensity matching score and 2SLS regression with instrumental variable approaches. Overall, the results show the important role of innovation in enhancing the firm performance of SMEs, which sheds light on the literature on the controversial relation between innovation and SMEs performance in the world.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation of the paper is the lack of data. Although the database used in the paper is widely used to analyze SMEs in Vietnam, it covers about 2,500 firms in only nine provinces/cities in Vietnam.

Practical implications

Policymakers should enact relevant policies to support SMEs with innovation activities, thereby increasing firm performance and their competitiveness. For instance, encouragement policies or financial incentives (tax reduction or subsidies) for innovative firms should be implemented and/or fostered.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper to examine the effect of different types of innovation on the performance of SMEs in Vietnam.

Details

Applied Economic Analysis, vol. 31 no. 92
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2632-7627

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2024

Huong Le, Joohan Lee, Neena Gopalan and Beatrice Van der Heijden

Drawing on the conservation of resources theory, this study examines how proactive skill development (PSD) influences job performance and mediating and moderating mechanisms…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the conservation of resources theory, this study examines how proactive skill development (PSD) influences job performance and mediating and moderating mechanisms underlying the above relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a sample of 261 full-time workers in three waves, spaced by a six-week interval (Time 1, N = 360; Time 2, N = 320; Time 3, N = 261).

Findings

The results confirmed that career stress mediated the relationship between PSD and job performance. Additionally, high career decidedness strengthened this negative relationship between stress and performance. Furthermore, career decidedness significantly moderated the indirect PSD–performance relationship via career stress, accentuating the indirect effect when decidedness is higher.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on the important role of proactive skills development in influencing job performance and what factors can affect this relationship. It offers practical implications by highlighting how targeted training can boost employees' proactivity and performance.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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