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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Mohamed Mousa and Vesa Puhakka

The purpose of this paper is to focus on physicians in the four public hospitals located in the October province (Egypt) in an attempt to explore the effect of responsible…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on physicians in the four public hospitals located in the October province (Egypt) in an attempt to explore the effect of responsible leadership on physicians’ affective, continuance and normative commitment with and without mediating the role of organizational inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 360 physicians were contacted and all of them received a set of questionnaires. After two follow-ups, a total of 240 responses were collected with a response rate of 66.67 percent. The authors used the χ2 test to determine the association between responsible leadership and organizational inclusion. Multiple regressions were employed to show how much variation in affective, continuance and normative commitment can be explained by responsible leadership and organizational inclusion.

Findings

The findings highlight a positive association between responsible leadership and organizational inclusion. Moreover, another positive association is also explored between organizational inclusion and affective, continuance and normative commitment. Furthermore, the statistical analysis proved that having an atmosphere of respect, equality and sameness in the workplace fosters the effect of responsible leaders on physicians’ affective, normative and continuance commitment.

Originality/value

This paper contributes by filling a gap in HR management, cultural diversity and organization literature, in which empirical studies on the relationship between responsible leadership, organizational inclusion and organizational commitment have been limited until now.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Ningyu Tang, Xingshan Zheng and Chiyin Chen

This paper aims to apply and integrate the existing literature of inclusion to develop a multi-level theory of organizational inclusion for the more and more diverse workforce.

1239

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to apply and integrate the existing literature of inclusion to develop a multi-level theory of organizational inclusion for the more and more diverse workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper first analyzes the issue of workforce diversity in China, and then reviews the concept of organizational inclusion. After that, this paper develops a multi-level model of organizational inclusion catering to Chinese diversity issue.

Findings

This paper outlines a series of propositions on how organizational, group, interpersonal and individual factors affect inclusion at both organizational and individual levels, and the consequences of inclusion in the workplace.

Originality/value

This paper is the first research to discuss the inclusion management in Chinese context. This paper proposes a multi-level theoretical model of organizational inclusion to guide empirical studies on the integration of the diversity in workplace in China.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 May 2018

Huong Le, Zhou Jiang, Yuka Fujimoto and Ingrid Nielsen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating roles of procedural justice and distributive justice in the organizational inclusion-affective well-being relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating roles of procedural justice and distributive justice in the organizational inclusion-affective well-being relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 253 Australian employees using an online survey. The study used confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling to analyze the data.

Findings

Organizational inclusion was positively related to both distributive justice and procedural justice. The relationship between organizational inclusion and affective well-being was mediated by both distributive justice and procedural justice.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design may have limited the empirical inferences; however, the proposed model was based on robust theoretical contentions, thus mitigating the limitation of the design. Data were collected from a single organization, thus limiting generalizability.

Practical implications

Implementation of inclusion training activities at organizational, group, and individual levels is important to enhance perceptions of organizational inclusion and subsequently improve employee affective well-being.

Originality/value

Based on the group engagement model and group-value model of justice, this paper adds to the literature by demonstrating two mediating mechanisms driving the organizational inclusion-affective well-being relationship.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Mohamed Mousa, Rami Ayoubi and Hiba Massoud

This paper addresses nurses working in public hospitals in order to find out how gender may affect their perception of both diversity management and organisational

Abstract

Purpose

This paper addresses nurses working in public hospitals in order to find out how gender may affect their perception of both diversity management and organisational inclusion. Moreover, and given the novelty of workplace fun and the lack of research in this field in the context of developing countries, the authors explore the relationship between diversity management and organisational inclusion and explore workplace fun as a predictor of organisational inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 360 questionnaires were collected from nurses in three public hospitals in Egypt. The authors applied a t-test to identify how gender may affect perceptions of diversity management. Moreover, the authors employed hierarchical regressions to test gender and diversity management as predictors of organisational inclusion and to test whether workplace fun can predict organisational inclusion, too.

Findings

The findings indicate that compared to their male colleagues, female nurses respond to diversity management practices more positively. Second, no significant statistical differences in the mean values for female and male nurses were observed regarding their perceptions of organisational inclusiveness. Third, diversity management is positively associated with organisational inclusion for the nurses. Finally, workplace fun mediates the relationship between diversity management perceptions and organisational inclusion.

Originality/value

This paper contributes by filling a gap in human resources (HR) research in the health-care sector, in which empirical studies on the relationship between gender, workplace fun and organisational inclusion have been limited so far.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2020

Beth G. Chung, Michelle A. Dean and Karen Holcombe Ehrhart

This study examines whether inclusion values predict organizational outcomes through mediating effects of inclusive HR practices and investigates whether intellectual…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines whether inclusion values predict organizational outcomes through mediating effects of inclusive HR practices and investigates whether intellectual (human and social) capital serves as a contingency variable in moderating the relationship between practices and outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Organizational-level data were collected from 79 senior-level executives. Hypotheses were examined via regression analyses and the product-of-coefficients approach was used to test for indirect and conditional indirect effects.

Findings

This study found a positive relationship between inclusion values and inclusive HR practices and between inclusive HR practices and organization-level outcomes. Inclusive HR practices mediated the relationship between values and outcomes and intellectual capital moderated the relationship between practices and outcomes, such that inclusive HR practices played a greater role in augmenting outcomes for organizations with lower intellectual capital.

Practical implications

Alignment of inclusion values and inclusive HR practices is important for organizational effectiveness, and inclusive HR practices are likely to play a particularly important role when an organization is relatively weak in intellectual capital.

Originality/value

This paper broadens the inclusion literature by using a macro-level lens to understand how organizational inclusion values and practices may relate to organizational outcomes. It also shows the importance of intellectual capital as a contextual variable in the inclusion practice to outcome relationship.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Chiyin Chen and Ningyu Tang

Perceived inclusion refers to employees’ perception of their inclusion status in the workplace. This concept offers a new perspective to understand employees’ experiences…

3703

Abstract

Purpose

Perceived inclusion refers to employees’ perception of their inclusion status in the workplace. This concept offers a new perspective to understand employees’ experiences within today’s complex working environment. However, research on how perceived inclusion influences employee behavior is lacking. The purpose of this paper is to explore the mechanism of perceived inclusion through the lens of the social exchange perspective and role identity theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 257 employees and 60 supervisors in a manufacturing company. Multi-level structural equation modeling and the Monte Carlo method were applied to test the mediation effect.

Findings

The results indicated that employees’ perceived inclusion was positively associated with job role and innovator role performance through the mediation of organizational commitment. Perceived inclusion was also directly associated with team role performance.

Originality/value

This is the first study to empirically examine perceived inclusion in the workplace from the social exchange and role identity perspective. It revealed that perceived inclusion fosters employees’ commitment toward the organization, which in turn influences their work-role behaviors. Theoretical contributions and practical implications are discussed.

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2020

Huong Le, Catrina Palmer Johnson and Yuka Fujimoto

This article examines a climate for inclusion through the lens of organizational justice. We argue that open interpersonal contacts, the fair treatment of gender-diverse…

1531

Abstract

Purpose

This article examines a climate for inclusion through the lens of organizational justice. We argue that open interpersonal contacts, the fair treatment of gender-diverse employees, and inclusive decision-making processes in the promotion of equitable employment practices are foundational for shaping the climate for inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected from multi sources: focus groups with female employees (N = 20) and interviews with male and female managers (N = 8).

Findings

In examining the similarities and differences between employees' and managers' perspectives, the findings revealed that, in all dimensions of a climate for inclusion, employees had more negative justice concerns than did managers, while managers and employees had similar views on some aspects of employment practices.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted within one university setting; therefore, the findings may not be applicable to other industries.

Practical implications

This study offers managerial implications that can be developed to promote the climate for inclusion in organizations.

Social implications

In order to create a fair and equitable workplace, all employees should be able to actively participate in decision-making processes and share suggestions for contextualized and fair employment practices.

Originality/value

Drawing the group-value model, this study advocates the importance of justice-based organizational practices in building an inclusive organization.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Beth K. Humberd, Judith A. Clair and Stephanie J. Creary

The purpose of this paper is to build insight into how the local community impacts an organization’s ability to develop an inclusive culture. The paper introduces the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build insight into how the local community impacts an organization’s ability to develop an inclusive culture. The paper introduces the concept of inclusion disconnects as incongruent experiences of inclusion between an organization and its community. Then, using the case of teaching hospitals, the paper empirically demonstrates how individuals and organizations experience and deal with inclusion disconnects across the boundaries of organization and community.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-method qualitative study was conducted in hospitals located in the same city. Focus groups were conducted with 11 medical trainees from underrepresented backgrounds and semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten leaders involved with diversity efforts at two hospitals. Data analysis followed an iterative approach built from Miles and Huberman (1994).

Findings

The findings demonstrate how boundary conflicts arise from disconnected experiences of organizational and community inclusiveness. Such disconnects create challenges for leaders in retaining and supporting minority individuals, and for trainees in feeling like they could build a life within, and outside of, their organizations. Based on findings from the data, the paper offers insights into how organizations can build their capacity to address these challenges by engaging in boundary work across organizational and community domains.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should build upon this work by further examining how inclusion disconnects between communities and organizations impact individuals and organizations.

Practical implications

The paper includes in-depth insight into how organizations can build their capacity to address such a deep-rooted challenge that comes from a less inclusive community.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to an understanding of how forces from the community outside an organization can shape internal efforts toward fostering inclusion and individuals’ experiences of inclusion.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Kenna Cottrill, Patricia Denise Lopez and Calvin C. Hoffman

The purpose of this paper is to examine perceptions of inclusion and related factors, to understand how organizations can encourage and facilitate the full participation…

7978

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine perceptions of inclusion and related factors, to understand how organizations can encourage and facilitate the full participation of employees. The research explored authentic leadership (AL) as an antecedent of inclusion, and two outcomes, organization-based self-esteem (OBSE) and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB).

Design/methodology/approach

Using an online survey, data were collected from 107 primary and 219 peer participants in various industries throughout the USA. Primary participants provided perceptual ratings on inclusion, AL, OBSE and OCB. Co-workers assessed primary participants’ OCB.

Findings

AL was positively related to inclusion (β=0.58, p<0.01) as well as self-rated OCB (β=0.36, p<0.01). Inclusion was positively associated with OBSE (β=0.48, p<0.01) and self-rated OCB (β=0.63, p<0.01). Inclusion mediated the relationship between AL and self-rated OCB. OBSE mediated the relationship between inclusion and self-rated OCB. All analyses controlled for the effects of race and gender.

Practical implications

Results suggest organizations can promote inclusive environments through AL, and that inclusive environments promote employees’ work-related self-esteem and their willingness to go above and beyond in their jobs.

Originality/value

This paper examines previously unstudied relationships, thus contributing to organizational theory and practice.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

George Gotsis and Katerina Grimani

Inclusion is of critical importance to creating healthier workplaces, if the ongoing dynamic of workforce diversity is taken for granted. The purpose of this paper is to…

3554

Abstract

Purpose

Inclusion is of critical importance to creating healthier workplaces, if the ongoing dynamic of workforce diversity is taken for granted. The purpose of this paper is to designate the role of spiritual leadership in fostering more humane and inclusive workplaces.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review the extant literature on two distinct research streams, inclusion and inclusive leadership, and spiritual leadership, elaborate a mediation model, identify antecedents and outcomes, and articulate a set of propositions reflecting key findings.

Findings

The authors advance a conceptual model according to which inclusive practices founded on spiritual values will mediate the positive relationship between spiritual leadership and a climate for inclusion. They argue that calling and membership as components of spiritual wellbeing will reinforce employees’ experience of both uniqueness and belongingness, thus affecting their perceptions of inclusion and inducing multi-level beneficial outcomes.

Practical implications

Spiritual leadership assumes a preeminent role in embracing and valuing diversity: it embodies a potential for positioning inclusive ideals more strategically, in view of enabling employees unfold their genuine selves and experience integration in work settings.

Social implications

Spiritual leadership helps inclusive goals to be situated in their societal context; inclusion is thus viewed as both an organizational and societal good, embedded in social contexts, and pertinent to corporate vision, mission and philosophy.

Originality/value

The paper examines spiritual leadership as a predictor of climates for inclusion. Drawing on spiritual values, spiritual leaders display a strong potential for inclusion, facilitating diverse employees to experience feelings of both belongingness and uniqueness in work settings that assume high societal relevance.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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