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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Cheng‐Chieh Hsiao, Hsiu Ju Rebecca Yen and Eldon Y. Li

With advances in information technology, multi‐channel shopping (MCS) has become a prevailing purchasing pattern today. Although MCS provides more benefits than single‐channel…

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Abstract

Purpose

With advances in information technology, multi‐channel shopping (MCS) has become a prevailing purchasing pattern today. Although MCS provides more benefits than single‐channel shopping, there is a need to investigate consumer values in the MCS context. This study aims to develop a consumer value hierarchy that represents how consumers think and pursue when performing MCS.

Design/methodology/approach

The research framework was developed from a perspective of means‐end theory. Two studies were designed to elicit and evaluate a consumer value hierarchy of MCS. First, a qualitative study was conducted to explore means‐end elements of MCS. Then, a hierarchical value map of MCS was constructed with 314 usable responses from an empirical survey in Taiwan. The impacts of past shopping experience on consumers' value perceptions were also examined.

Findings

In the hierarchical value map (HVM) of MCS, the results indicate 18 means‐end chains from ten MCS attributes resulting in nine consequences derived from those attributes, and then to four MCS values. The results also show that both expert and novice shoppers emphasize the utilitarian value of MCS; however, shopping novices pay more attention to the hedonic value of MCS than experts do.

Practical implications

This paper provides several managerial implications for multi‐channel retailers. Multi‐channel retailers need to know more about the attributes and functions of each channel that they offer in order to create a superior shopping experience for their customers. Also, retailers need to understand different MCS patterns for successful multi‐channel customer relationship management. Finally, the consumer value hierarchy of MCS is a useful tool for retailers to develop effective promotion strategies to increase customers' engagement in MCS.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to apply means‐end theory to investigate consumer value in the MCS context. It advances the consumer value literature in explaining a novel type of consumer channel‐mixing behavior. The paper concludes with implications for multi‐channel retailers, and future directions for MCS research are also discussed.

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Hsiu Ju Rebecca Yen and Kevin P. Gwinner

The application of technology‐based self‐service in service delivery has grown rapidly in recent years, but our current understanding of customer retention and satisfaction in…

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Abstract

The application of technology‐based self‐service in service delivery has grown rapidly in recent years, but our current understanding of customer retention and satisfaction in such contexts remains limited. This paper proposes a conceptual framework that utilizes the construct of relational benefits to explain the link between Internet‐based self‐service technology attributes and customer loyalty and satisfaction. The framework posits that confidence and special treatment benefits mediate the impact of Internet self‐service technology attributes on customer loyalty and satisfaction. The results of an empirical study using two contexts finds support for a fully mediated model. That is, confidence benefits mediate the impact of perceived control and performance on customer loyalty and satisfaction, while special treatment benefits mediate the relationship of efficiency and convenience with customer loyalty and satisfaction. The findings afford not only practical implications for marketers but also directions for future research on customer relational benefits and Internet‐based self‐service.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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