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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Carlos Wing‐Hung Lo and Albert Chun‐Yin Cheuk

This paper is an in‐depth analysis of community policing in Hong Kong. It includes an outline of the evolution of community policing in Hong Kong, identifies the…

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3105

Abstract

This paper is an in‐depth analysis of community policing in Hong Kong. It includes an outline of the evolution of community policing in Hong Kong, identifies the structural arrangements for the practice of community policing, examines major community‐based programs that have been launched, evaluates the performance of this strategy, and considers constraints on these policy initiatives. It shows that this community effort has already gone beyond the confines of promoting community relations in Hong Kong. The results have been encouraging. They include a significant improvement in the quality of police‐public interactions, the engagement of the public and their increased support in crime control and prevention, and the beginning of the conversion of traditional police enforcement to that of police services. However, the Force's use of community policing schemes predominantly for the pragmatic purpose of crime control has accounted for the lack of breakthroughs in forging a strategic partnership with the public to promote a secure and harmonious environment.

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Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Hoi-yan Cheung and Eddie Yu

The purpose of this paper is to review the strategic planning process of the Hong Kong Police Force (the Force) and its outcomes for the planning cycle of 2019-2021.

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1150

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the strategic planning process of the Hong Kong Police Force (the Force) and its outcomes for the planning cycle of 2019-2021.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an insider's perspective drawn from documentation, internal reports and field observation, this study is an analysis of the five-step strategic planning process of the Force as a case study over the two-year period by using the 3-H (Heart-Head-Hand) framework and futures studies.

Findings

This study demonstrates the Force's strategic management in practice. The 3-H framework and the Six Pillars Foresight Process are found to be useful tools in strategic planning. When the Heart, Head and Hand elements are developed and integrated as a mindset during the process, they help theorise the practice and experience of police officers towards a holistic and effective strategic management. Coupled with the foresight process, the Force will be more agile and outward focused in the Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous (VUCA) world.

Originality/value

This is the first study to apply the 3-H framework and futures thinking in analysing the process in a police organisation in Hong Kong. While strategic planning is an important process to set directions for an organisation to move forward, this study describes the process in terms of relevant practice and theoretical concepts. It is hoped that such experience can serve as reference for practitioners in other government departments and police organisations.

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Public Administration and Policy, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1727-2645

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Michael Chiu Kai‐ting

The purpose of this paper is to outline the development and implementation of the “values‐driven competency‐based performance management system” (VDCBPMS) and report the…

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1863

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the development and implementation of the “values‐driven competency‐based performance management system” (VDCBPMS) and report the findings of a study that aims to examine the effect of the new PMS on officers of the Hong Kong Police Force.

Design/methodology/approach

The research focuses on the officers’ perceptions and attitudes resulting from the intervention and hypothesizes that the new system will increase their organisational commitment and job satisfaction, job‐effort and value alignment with the Force, as well as overall performance of the Force through enhanced performance of individual officers. The study employs a staff survey and interviews with a cross section of officers in different ranks to examine the impact on them of VDCBPMS.

Findings

The research findings reveal evidence to support all the hypotheses and their implications for management are outlined.

Research limitations/implications

The research is not a done in a “before‐and‐after” fashion due to inherent limitations and the findings cannot be isolated from other clandestine management initiatives for examination due to practical limitations.

Practical implications

The research findings provide food for thought for the management to consider how best to improve the performance of officers in the Force.

Social implications

The research findings suggest ways to improve policing in Hong Kong, which ultimately will benefit the society of Hong Kong at large.

Originality/value

This research fills a void in the literature of competency‐based PMS by introducing the “values” dimension to the notion, and contributes to the study of public policy implementation by illustrating how a novice system is developed and introduced in a policing context.

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Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Dennis Lai Hang Hui and Ryan Chi Yan Au

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the interplay between police legitimacy and protest policing with reference to the case of Hong Kong.

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365

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interplay between police legitimacy and protest policing with reference to the case of Hong Kong.

Design/methodology/approach

This study will review the concepts of police legitimacy and protest policing and examine the evolving policing practices in Hong Kong since 2010.

Findings

The study argues that the increasing polarisation of society could render policing protest a potential source of problem for sustaining police legitimacy.

Originality/value

This is a pioneering study that looks at the interplay between police legitimacy and protest policing.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Anne Cheung

Doxing refers to the intentional public release by a third party of personal data without consent, often with the intent to humiliate, intimidate, harass, or punish the…

Abstract

Doxing refers to the intentional public release by a third party of personal data without consent, often with the intent to humiliate, intimidate, harass, or punish the individual concerned. Intuitively, it is tempting to condemn doxing as a crude form of cyber violence that weaponizes personal data. When it is used as a strategy of resistance by the powerless to hold the powerful accountable, however, a more nuanced understanding is called for. This chapter focuses on the doxing phenomenon in Hong Kong, where doxing incidents against police officers and their family members have skyrocketed since 2019 (a 75-fold increase over 2018). It contends that doxing for political purposes is closely related to digital vigilantism, signifying a loss of confidence in the ruling authority and a yearning for an alternative form of justice. The chapter therefore argues that public interest should be recognized as a legal defense in doxing cases when those discharging or entrusted with public duty are the targets. Equally, it is important to confine the categories of personal data disclosed to information necessary to reveal the alleged wrongdoer or wrongdoing. Only in this way can a fair balance be struck between privacy, freedom of expression, and public interest.

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The Emerald International Handbook of Technology-Facilitated Violence and Abuse
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-849-2

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Jessica C.M. Li, Jacky C.K. Cheung and Ivan Y. Sun

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of demands from three life domains: society, workplace and family and different resources at the individual, family and…

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1243

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of demands from three life domains: society, workplace and family and different resources at the individual, family and supervisor levels on occupational stress and work engagement among Hong Kong police officers.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey based on a random sample of 514 male and female police officers was conducted, and multivariate regression was employed to assess the effects of demands and resources on work stress and work engagement.

Findings

Family–work conflicts, organizational and operational factors affected work stress and work engagement among police officers. Constructive coping was found to be positively related to work stress and negatively associated with work engagement.

Research limitations/implications

Survey data collected from a single Chinese city may not be generalized to officers in other parts of China or Chinese societies with different social and political contexts.

Originality/value

The present study filled the knowledge gap about factors influencing police stress and engagement. This study provides insights into how to establish relevant contextual measures to reduce police work stress. This study represents one of the first attempts to use a random sample of police officers for the investigation of police stress in Hong Kong.

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Policing: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Book part
Publication date: 21 July 2011

Jon S.T. Quah

In late April 1973, Charles P. Sutcliffe, the Commissioner of the Royal Hong Kong Police Force (RHKPF), received confidential information that Chief Superintendent Peter…

Abstract

In late April 1973, Charles P. Sutcliffe, the Commissioner of the Royal Hong Kong Police Force (RHKPF), received confidential information that Chief Superintendent Peter F. Godber, Deputy District Police Commander for Kowloon, was remitting money abroad. This information was transmitted to James J. E. Morrin, the Director of the Anti-Corruption Office (ACO), for investigation. By the end of May 1973, investigations by the ACO officers revealed that Godber had deposited in Hong Kong banks or remitted overseas HK$650,000 (US$128,332) since 1968 (Blair-Kerr, 1973a, pp. 3–4).

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Curbing Corruption in Asian Countries: An Impossible Dream?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-819-0

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

May L.-Y. Wong

The purpose of this paper is to examine the newspaper representations of the aggressive behaviour of social actors in political protests and explore the benefits of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the newspaper representations of the aggressive behaviour of social actors in political protests and explore the benefits of integrating corpus linguistics and cognitive approaches to a critical discourse analysis in analysing press reports.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses methods from corpus linguistics and theoretical constructs from cognitive linguistics to examine patterns of representation around Occupy Central, a recent political protest in Hong Kong, in two corpora of English-language newspaper articles published in China Daily and the South China Morning Post (SCMP).

Findings

An analysis of the ten most frequent collocates of the word police showed that the China Daily corpus articles typically index the presentation of police as vulnerable yet professional in their handling of violent protesters, whereas in SCMP, police officers are often presented as aggressors. The analysis subsequently considered three discursive strategies, namely structural configuration, framing and identification that are mediated through conceptualisations that representations in text evoke.

Research limitations/implications

In the proposed integrated approach, quantitative investigations of corpus examples could be focussed and contextualised in such a way that particular linguistic instantiations in discourse which are proved statistically salient can be further analysed in relation to conceptual phenomena which serve specific ideological purposes.

Originality/value

Hopefully, the study could serve as the first ever attempt to adopt an integrative analytical framework in the study of aggression and conflict in news discourse.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Tsz Yiu Terry Wan, Tsi Huen Tristan Chiew, Tsz Pan Harold Cheung, Felix Kar Yue Wong, Ching Tsoi and Karen Joe Laidler

The purpose of this study is to gain an “insider” understanding of contemporary methods and operations in parallel trading in the North District.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to gain an “insider” understanding of contemporary methods and operations in parallel trading in the North District.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from in-depth interviews and field observations, we explore how this demand has led to two major consequences.

Findings

First, contemporary parallel trading has resulted in the rise of an organized system with coordinated roles and a range of workers moving in concert colloquially understood as the ant-moving-home (“螞蟻搬家” or “maangai bungaa”) approach. Second, the demand for parallel goods has led to alterations in the border landscape disturbances to daily order, shortages of daily goods and rising prices which, in turn, have led to organized protests around political identity and new challenges for policing the border.

Research limitations/implications

Our objective is to gain an “insider” understanding of contemporary methods and operations in parallel trading in the North District. A second limitation is the problem of generalization. Given the relatively small number of interviews and limited time for field observations, this study cannot provide a generalized account of the operation of the grey economy in the North District.

Originality/value

This article has drawn from several data sources to construct a holistic understanding of parallel trading and the associated public disorder in the North District. While parallel trading exists in many other countries, the situation in Hong Kong is somewhat distinct, in part, because the border trading site involves “one country but two systems” and accordingly is associated with other problems in relation to public security, social disturbance and identity conflict. These newly emerged issues on policing, not covered in this study, are important to future research.

Details

Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1871-2673

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Book part
Publication date: 8 March 2021

Jon S. T. Quah

Singapore and Hong Kong are the least corrupt Asian countries according to their rankings and scores on Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index in 2018…

Abstract

Singapore and Hong Kong are the least corrupt Asian countries according to their rankings and scores on Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index in 2018 and other indicators. This chapter explains why these two city-states have succeeded in minimizing corruption and identifies the four best practices which might serve as lessons for policy-makers in other countries.

Details

Corruption in the Public Sector: An International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-643-3

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