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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Nicola North and Frances Hughes

Recent New Zealand reports have identified the nursing workforce for its potential to make a significant contribution to increased productivity in health services. The…

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3109

Abstract

Purpose

Recent New Zealand reports have identified the nursing workforce for its potential to make a significant contribution to increased productivity in health services. The purpose of this paper is to review critically the recent and current labour approaches to improve nursing productivity in New Zealand, in a context of international research and experience.

Design/methodology/approach

An examination of government documents regarding productivity, and a review of New Zealand and international literature and research on nursing productivity and its measurement form the basis of the paper.

Findings

It is found that productivity improvement strategies are influenced by theories of labour economics and scientific management that conceptualise a nurse as a labour unit and a cost to the organisation. Nursing productivity rose significantly with the health reforms of the 1990s that reduced nursing input costs but impacts on patient safety and nurses were negative. Current approaches to increasing nursing productivity, including the “productive ward” and reconfiguration of nursing teams, also draw on manufacturing innovations. Emerging thinking considers productivity in the context of the work environment and changing professional roles, and proposes reconceptualising the nurse as an intellectual asset to knowledge‐intensive health organisations.

Practical implications

Strategies that take a systems approach to nursing productivity, that view nursing as a capital asset, that focus on the interface between nurse and working environment and measure patient and nurse outcomes are advocated.

Originality/value

The paper shows that reframing nursing productivity brings into focus management strategies to raise productivity while protecting nursing and patient outcomes.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Wayne N. Burton, Alyssa B. Schultz, Chin‐Yu Chen and Dee W. Edington

Depression and other mental health disorders have a large impact on the quality of life and productivity of millions of individuals worldwide. For employers, mental health

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2104

Abstract

Purpose

Depression and other mental health disorders have a large impact on the quality of life and productivity of millions of individuals worldwide. For employers, mental health disorders are associated with increased health care costs as well as productivity losses in the form of absenteeism, short‐term disability absences and reduced on‐the‐job productivity‐known as presenteeism. The purpose of this paper is to review the association of worker productivity and mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

This review summarizes the literature on the prevalence of mental health conditions among working adults, and the association between these disorders and productivity. Finally, the impact of interventions or workplace policies on the productivity of those suffering with mental health conditions is covered and recommendations for employers are suggested.

Findings

Depressive disorders are relatively common in most workforces compared to other mental health conditions. The majority of studies on mental health and productivity have been conducted as part of nationwide surveys or in patient populations rather than worksites. The majority of studies show associations between mental health conditions and absenteeism (particularly short‐term disability absences). When presenteeism is measured by a validated questionnaire, results show that depression significantly impacts on‐the‐job productivity (presenteeism). Studies also indicate that the treatment expenditures for employees with depression may be offset by reductions in absenteeism, disability and on the job productivity losses.

Originality/value

Workplace policies and benefits which support employees suffering with mental health disorders and provide access to evidenced‐based care adhering to best practice guidelines may improve the quality of life of employees and lead to reduced absenteeism, disability and lost productivity.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2018

Pubuduni Anuradha Meegahapola and R.A. Ranga Prabodanie

Some manufacturing processes generate extreme temperatures, noise and other irritating environmental conditions. These environmental factors can have a negative impact on…

Abstract

Purpose

Some manufacturing processes generate extreme temperatures, noise and other irritating environmental conditions. These environmental factors can have a negative impact on workers’ performance and health. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of temperature, noise and lighting on factory workers’ productivity and day-to-day health in a rubber compound manufacturing plant.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary data on productivity, measurements of factory environmental conditions, and records of medical advice and treatments over a period of three months were used in this study. Causal analysis was performed using statistical techniques ANOVA and regression analysis in SPSS statistical package.

Findings

The results revealed that higher levels of temperature and noise inside the factory can cause lower productivity levels. High temperature may not only reduce the productivity but also contribute to illnesses or heat-stress symptoms such as headaches. The results further suggested that both noise and lighting level do not have a statistically significant impact on workers’ health. No statistical evidence was found on lighting level having an impact on workers’ productivity.

Research limitations/implications

The study was particularly focused on a rubber compound manufacturing plant. However, the results were consistent with the results obtained in similar studies which focused on leather and shoe industry and automobile assembly industry.

Originality/value

The impact of environmental conditions on workers’ performance and health has been studied with respect to few industries and regions. This is the first of that kind carried out in Sri Lanka. Clear evidence of productivity losses and health impacts caused by high temperatures, raises the need for improving the working conditions.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Joses M. Kirigia, Ali Emrouznejad, Rui Gama Vaz, Henry Bastiene and Jude Padayachy

The purpose of this paper is to measure the technical and scale efficiency of health centres; to evaluate changes in productivity; and to highlight possible policy…

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1968

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure the technical and scale efficiency of health centres; to evaluate changes in productivity; and to highlight possible policy implications of the results for policy makers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data envelopment analysis (DEA) is employed to assess the technical and scale efficiency, and productivity change over a four‐year period among 17 public health centres.

Findings

During the period of study, the results suggest that the public health centres in Seychelles have exhibited mean overall or technical efficiency of above 93 per cent. It was also found that the overall productivity increased by 2.4 per cent over 2001‐2004.

Research limitations/implications

Further research can be undertaken to gather data on the prices of the various inputs to facilitate an estimation of the allocative efficiency of clinics. If such an exercise were to be undertaken, researchers may also consider collecting data on quantities and prices of paramedical, administrative and support staff to ensure that the analysis is more comprehensive than the study reported in this paper. Institutionalization of efficiency monitoring would help to enhance further the already good health sector stewardship and governance.

Originality/value

This paper provides new empirical evidence on a four‐year trend in the efficiency and productivity of health centres in Seychelles.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 57 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Ron Z. Goetzel, Ronald J. Ozminkowski, Jennie Bowen and Maryam J. Tabrizi

The paper seeks to describe the evolution of an integrated approach to health and productivity management that combines the disciplines of worksite health promotion and

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2635

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to describe the evolution of an integrated approach to health and productivity management that combines the disciplines of worksite health promotion and occupational safety and health, and to offer advice on how to implement such an integrated approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a review of the literature, focusing on the psychological, organizational, and human capital models that must be integrated for successful health and productivity management.

Findings

The first integrated health, safety, and productivity model was presented by DeJoy and Southern in 1993. However, occupational safety and health and worksite health promotion professionals view the workplace in different ways (from psychological and public health orientations, respectively) that may result in siloed work environments. Better communication and collaboration across these disciplines is essential for success. That can be fostered by adopting a human capital framework that views the health and safety of employees as essential ingredients for a healthy and productive work force. A practical approach for successful health and productivity management uses integrated data to investigate where challenges to worker health and safety can be found. This is followed by strategic and tactical planning to address these challenges. Programs that address problems at all levels (individual, organizational, environmental) are then adopted, followed by formal, rigorous, and continuous monitoring and evaluation.

Originality/value

The concept of integrated health and productivity management is new but is now being adopted by many organizations. Worksite health promotion and occupational safety and health professionals can work together to make substantial improvements to the quality of employees' lives and the economic and social health of the organizations where they practice.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Saleh Mollahaliloglu, Sahin Kavuncubasi, Fikriye Yilmaz, Mustafa Z. Younis, Fatih Simsek, Mustafa Kostak, Selami Yildirim and Emeka Nwagwu

Turkish Ministry of Health (MoH) has Health Transformation Program (HTP). The purpose of this program has been to modify the structure of the current system in order to…

Abstract

Purpose

Turkish Ministry of Health (MoH) has Health Transformation Program (HTP). The purpose of this program has been to modify the structure of the current system in order to enhance health system productivity, quality, and access in the Turkish health system. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

To measure the productivity, a data envelopment analysis-based Malmquist index approach was employed.

Findings

Results showed that the overall HTP have had a considerable positive impact on the productivity of general hospitals.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation is the availability of some data that might not be collected or reported to the MoH in Turkey.

Practical implications

This research’s findings will have an impact on reforming the health care system in Turkey to be competitive and efficient as possible.

Social implications

The research will have implication on reducing cost and provide value to the Turkish population.

Originality/value

This is one of the very few articles that targeted the efficiency of hospital system in Turkey.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Jill Miller

The purpose of this paper is to position well-being as a necessary component of the productivity debate and highlights the need for a deeper understanding of the nature of…

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1535

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to position well-being as a necessary component of the productivity debate and highlights the need for a deeper understanding of the nature of such a link. It first considers productivity at the national level in order to show how this affects both the climate and the economic policies within which organisations operate.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents an overview of current research and practice in the area. It treats the organisation as the primary level of analysis, and before highlights some of the apparent challenges in conceptualising well-being.

Findings

The importance of well-being is rising up national and employer agendas. Organisations need people to perform at their best in a sustainable way. The paper argues that an organisation with well-being at its core will reap productivity gains. It supports the view in the literature that improvements at national level can only be made on the back of sophisticated strategies across numerous organisations. However, for this to happen shared actions and understanding of these challenges has first to be created and acted upon across institutions and organisations. There are notable costs of poor well-being to productivity, and identifiable benefits of promoting and supporting employee well-being for productivity.

Practical implications

There is a clear practice implementation gap. Some organisations are embracing the opportunities to invest in their staff, but those who make employee well-being a business priority and a fundamental part of how the organisation operates are in the minority. There is also an ongoing challenge of measuring the impact of well-being programmes which can inform ROI assessments and enable organisations to demonstrate the business benefits of employee well-being.

Originality/value

There remain many unanswered questions about both the nature of the link between well-being and productivity and the economic impact of an association. This paper sparks further interest in expanding the understanding of the well-being and productivity link or peripheral issues.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Ronald Loeppke

Health is inextricably linked to the productivity and therefore the economic viability of individuals, populations and nations. A global strategy for health enhancement…

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1100

Abstract

Purpose

Health is inextricably linked to the productivity and therefore the economic viability of individuals, populations and nations. A global strategy for health enhancement would yield a multitude of benefits for humankind. The root cause of the escalating healthcare cost crisis is driven by a health crisis from a growing burden of health risks that are leading to an expanding burden of chronic illness yielding an unsustainable economic burden. This paper aims to present a general review of the business value of health and the power of prevention in addressing solutions for managing total health and productivity costs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the scientific and economic business case for investing in health enhancement.

Findings

Highlights of employer case studies and published research demonstrate that comprehensive, integrated population health enhancement can lower health risks, reduce the burden of illness, improve productivity and lower total health‐related costs. The dominant components of the solution are a substantial commitment to prevention and a culture of health rather than just more treatment and cure. In addition there needs to be a focus on the quality and effectiveness of care rather than just the quantity and efficiency of the care.

Originality/value

The healthcare cost conundrum can be impacted by reducing the burden of chronic illness and health risk in populations, thereby improving the health and productivity of the workforce, the health of the bottom line for engaged employers and ultimately the health of a nation's economy. Ultimately, the broader value proposition of integrated population health and productivity enhancement should drive this strategy by leveraging the value of health and the power of prevention.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Jeremiah Chinnadurai, Vidhya Venugopal, Kumaravel P and Paramesh R

Raise in temperatures due to climate change is likely to increase the heat stress in occupations that are physically exerting and performed outdoors which might…

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1227

Abstract

Purpose

Raise in temperatures due to climate change is likely to increase the heat stress in occupations that are physically exerting and performed outdoors which might potentially have adverse health and productivity consequences. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the productivities in construction work under the influence of heat stress using the predicted mean vote (PMV) index.

Design/methodology/approach

Field studies were conducted during May 2014 which is summer time in Chennai. Continuous heart rate of workers and wet bulb globe temperature measurements are conducted for workers engaged in different jobs in construction. Metabolic rates and the workload of the workers from heart rate were calculated using the ISO method 8996 and the PMV values are calculated using the tool developed by Malchaire based on the method ISO 7730. Direct observations and personal interviews were conducted to substantiate the productivity estimations.

Findings

The results showed that workers working outdoors with moderate and heavy workload exceeded the threshold limit value of 28°C and had adverse productivity impacts (18-35 per cent productivity loss), whereas the workers engaged in light indoor work was not affected by heat stress and consequent productivity losses. The productivity estimations using the PMV index is found to be statistically significant for three types of construction works (Pearson correlation coefficient value of −0.78) and also correlated well with the observations and self-reported productivities of the workers.

Originality/value

The method used in this paper provides a scientific and reliable estimation of the productivities which may benefit the industry to set realistic project completion goals in hot weather and also implement interventions and policies to protect workers’ health. Developing adaptive strategies and implementing control measures are the need of the hour to protect worker’s health and economic losses in the face of climate change.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 65 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1996

Janis L. Miller and Everett E. Adam

Improving quality and productivity simultaneously is vital to organizational competitiveness. Although continuous improvement is accepted as the objective for world class…

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784

Abstract

Improving quality and productivity simultaneously is vital to organizational competitiveness. Although continuous improvement is accepted as the objective for world class competition, it is not clear as to which interventions achieve the best performance, which variables intervene by enhancing or restricting the achievement of high quality and productivity, or which measures are appropriate for evaluating differences. Develops a quality evaluation tool and total factor productivity measures for health care clinics. Uses data envelopment analysis (DEA) to discriminate between high and low slack groups. Finds that hypothesized relationships and interactions between quality, productivity, and slack generally have statistically insignificant differences, exceptions being that health care consumers were able to identify characteristics of high and low quality care as well as health care professionals and that health care quality can increase with no decline in productivity when there is high‐slack. In general, high‐slack clinics could increase quality or productivity, but not both.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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