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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Fabiola Baltar and Ignasi Brunet

The aim of this paper is to present a sampling method using virtual networks to study “hard‐to‐reachpopulations. In the ambit of social research, the use of new…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present a sampling method using virtual networks to study “hard‐to‐reachpopulations. In the ambit of social research, the use of new technologies is still questioned because the selection bias is an obstacle to carry on scientific research on the Internet. In this regard, the authors' hypothesis is that the use of social networking sites (Web 2.0) can be effective for the study of “hard‐to‐reachpopulations. The main advantages of this technique are that it can expand the geographical scope and facilitates the identification of individuals with barriers to access. Therefore, the use of virtual networks in non‐probabilistic samples can increase the sample size and its representativeness.

Design/methodology/approach

To test this hypothesis, a virtual method was designed using Facebook to identify Argentinean immigrant entrepreneurs in Spain (214 cases). A characteristic of this population is that some individuals are administratively invisible in national statistics because they have double nationality (non‐EU and EU). The use of virtual sampling was combined with an online questionnaire as a complementary tool for Web 2.0 research in behavioural sciences.

Findings

The number of cases detected by Facebook and the virtual response rate is higher than traditional snowball technique. The explanation is that people increase their level of confidence because the researcher shows his personal information (Facebook's profile) and also participates in their groups of interest (Facebook's groups). Moreover, the online questionnaires administration allows the quality of the information to be controlled and avoids duplication of cases.

Originality/value

The present article is the first that uses Facebook as an instrument to study immigrants. Therefore its adoption represents a great challenge in the social research field because there are many barriers of access and search. It also proposes a novel mix of traditional methodologies updated with the use of new virtual possibilities of studying hard to reach populations, especially in areas of social research where the contributions of these methods are less developed.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Maria Hepi, Jeff Foote, Jörg Finsterwalder, Moana-o-Hinerangi Moana-o-Hinerangi, Sue Carswell and Virginia Baker

This study aims to understand the engagement between an indigenous social service provider and marginalised clients deemed “hard-to-reach” to gain an insight into how to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand the engagement between an indigenous social service provider and marginalised clients deemed “hard-to-reach” to gain an insight into how to improve the client’s engagement and well-being through transformative value co-creation.

Design/methodology/approach

The exploratory study’s findings draw on primary data employing a qualitative research approach through document analysis and in-depth interviews with clients, social workers and stakeholders of the focal social service provider in New Zealand.

Findings

The findings indicate that there are inhibitors and enablers of value or well-being co-creation. The lack of client resources and a mismatch between client and social worker are primary barriers. Other actors as well as cultural practices are identified as enablers of well-being improvement.

Research limitations/implications

This research reports on a single social service provider and its clients. These findings may not be readily transferrable to other contexts.

Practical implications

Findings indicate that social service providers require a heightened awareness of the inhibitors and enablers of social service co-creation.

Social implications

Both the integrative framework and the findings provide a sound critique of the prevailing policy discourse surrounding the stigmatisation of members of society deemed “hard-to-reach” and the usefulness of such an approach when aiming at resolving social issues.

Originality/value

This is the first exploratory study that reports on the engagement between a social service provider and its clients in a dedicated Māori (indigenous) context by employing an integrative research approach combining transformative service research, activity theory and engagement theory.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Natalia Vershinina and Yulia Rodionova

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the issues in studying hidden populations, with particular focus on methodology used to investigate ethnic minority entrepreneurs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the issues in studying hidden populations, with particular focus on methodology used to investigate ethnic minority entrepreneurs who illegally run their businesses in the UK. In this paper, on reflection, the authors look at what issues should be considered before engaging with such communities, as we identify current approaches and evaluate their merits.

Design/methodology/approach

Certain methodological problems are faced by researchers working with hidden populations, and this paper explores these using a sample of Ukrainian illegal self‐employed construction workers operating in London. Semi‐structured interviews with 20 Ukrainians showcase the issues raised and help illustrate the limited applicability of some commonly used research methods to ethnic minority entrepreneurship studies. The authors used an intermediary to help gain access to these illegal migrants in order to satisfy the sensitive issues of this vulnerable group of respondents.

Findings

The authors analyse the ethical considerations, problems and issues with access to such data, discuss early and more recent sampling methodologies and the ways to estimate the size of hidden population. This paper, hence, establishes the state‐of‐the‐art approaches in this field and proposes potential improvements in achieving representativeness of the data. Using the Ukrainian illegal self‐employed construction workers as an example, this paper evaluates the choices made by the researchers.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper is to showcase the methodological issues emerging when studying hard‐to‐reach groups and to emphasise the limited applicability of some methods to research on hidden populations.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 31 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2006

Mira Paskota

Abstract

Details

Travel Survey Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044662-2

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2019

Fernanda Dachi Carrets, Felipe Garcia Ribeiro and Gibran da Silva Teixeira

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether isolated illiteracy generates a barrier to knowledge about the Brazilian Federal Government’s Single Registry for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether isolated illiteracy generates a barrier to knowledge about the Brazilian Federal Government’s Single Registry for social programs.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on information contained in the Brazilian National Household Sample Survey (Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicilios – PNAD) 2014, the propensity score matching method was combined with the algorithm proposed by Imbens (2015). The analyzed sample consists of two groups of illiterate individuals: isolated illiterates (IILs) (treatment group), which consists of only illiterate individuals who live with other illiterates; and proximate illiterates (PILs) (control group), which consists of illiterates who live with someone who is literate in the household.

Findings

Evidence indicates that IIL individuals are, on average, less likely to know about the single registry than PIL people.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation relates to the database since the only information available in the PNAD on the access to the single registry is for the year 2014.

Practical implications

The evidence found in the study reinforces the need to invest in the fight against illiteracy in Brazil.

Social implications

Results show that a portion of the possible beneficiaries of social programs are still “invisible” to the government’s social protection networks, and this highlights the existence of possible errors of exclusion.

Originality/value

The paper compares two groups of illiterate people, a group that lives in an isolated illiteracy situation and the other that does not. It also assesses the effect of literacy externalities on the access to the Brazilian Single Registry.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Transport Survey Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78-190288-2

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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2017

Leonor Rodriguez

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the methodological challenges in the design and implementation of an emotionally sensitive topic involving research with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the methodological challenges in the design and implementation of an emotionally sensitive topic involving research with adolescents based on a study evaluating the experiences of adolescents and families facing a diagnosis of maternal cancer.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper builds an argument based on experiences from the field of qualitative data collection with adolescents and builds on arguments that were identified in the literature to provide with a detailed argument on the methodological challenges that researchers can face while undertaking sensitive research with young people.

Findings

Carrying out research on sensitive topics is challenging because rigour can be affected by real people experiencing pain, sorrow and other emotions linked to sensitive and difficult moments in their lives. Researchers need to decide how they will deal with the emotional impact that these topics can have on them as people but also continue to carry out high quality research.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the current body of knowledge by describing the challenges faced in the field carrying out data on sensitive issues with adolescents but it also provides alternatives and solutions on how these limitations can be overcome from early stages of the research design until the dissemination of results.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 November 2009

Patrick Bonnel, Martin Lee-Gosselin, Jean-Loup Madre and Johanna Zmud

At the 2008 International Conference on Transport Survey Methods in Annecy, France, transport survey methodologists and practitioners shared their experience with keeping…

Abstract

At the 2008 International Conference on Transport Survey Methods in Annecy, France, transport survey methodologists and practitioners shared their experience with keeping abreast of the data needs of a rapidly changing world. Over the past decade, this has translated into the need for: an expanded travel survey toolkit; methodological innovation for surveys of freight and public transport operations; a growing use of data collection and processing technologies; a need to align surveys with other data streams; and an increased interest in the comparability of international datasets on personal travel and commodity movements in an era of globalisation. We discuss how these guided the choice and scope of the five themes around which both the Annecy Conference and this book were organised.

Details

Transport Survey Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84-855844-1

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

Mumtaz Ali Memon, Rohani Salleh, Muhammad Zeeshan Mirza, Jun-Hwa Cheah, Hiram Ting, Muhammad Shakil Ahmad and Adeel Tariq

This study aims to examine the impact of employees' satisfaction with human resource management (HRM) practices (i.e. training satisfaction, performance appraisal…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of employees' satisfaction with human resource management (HRM) practices (i.e. training satisfaction, performance appraisal satisfaction and pay satisfaction) on work engagement and subsequently employee turnover intentions. The mediating role of work engagement between employee satisfaction with HRM practices and turnover intentions is also assessed.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from Malaysian oil and gas (O&G) professionals. A total of 442 useable questionnaires were obtained for the final data analysis. Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was performed to test the hypothesised relationships.

Findings

The findings indicate that training satisfaction and performance appraisal satisfaction are the key drivers of employee engagement at work. Work engagement in turn has a negative impact on employee turnover intentions. Furthermore, work engagement mediates the relationship between employees' satisfaction with HRM practices (i.e. training satisfaction and performance appraisal satisfaction) and turnover intentions. Nevertheless, it did not have any mediating effect on pay satisfaction and turnover intention.

Practical implications

Training plans should be designed to make the relevant jobs more attractive and fulfilling, thus increasing employees' level of work engagement. Besides, ensuring that the appraisal system is fair is pivotal to work engagement. Work engagement will cultivate a strong sense of emotional attachment between employees and employers, thus reducing the turnover intention of Malaysian O&G professionals.

Originality/value

To date, little has been done on employees' satisfaction with HRM practices with respect to their attitudinal and behavioural outcomes. The present study enhances our understanding of the importance of employees' satisfaction with HRM practices and its relation to employees' work engagement and turnover intentions.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Andrew R. Gillam and Alina M. Waite

The purpose of this paper is to examine gender differences in predictors of technology threat avoidance motivation and behavior among working US adults. Implications were…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine gender differences in predictors of technology threat avoidance motivation and behavior among working US adults. Implications were considered in regard to cybersecurity awareness training motivation and perceptions of need for protective cybersecurity behavior in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

A single-shot regression-based study used ordinal regression supported by K-means clustering to evaluate the moderating effects of gender on predictors of technology threat avoidance motivation and behavior on a sample of n = 206 US adult workers.

Findings

The regression model explained 47.5% of variance in avoidance motivation and 39% of avoidance behavior variance. Gender moderated predictive associations between several independent variables and avoidance motivation: perceived susceptibility, perceived effectiveness, perceived cost and self-efficacy. Gender also moderated the association between avoidance motivation and avoidance behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The predictive impact of gender extends beyond the main effects in technology threat avoidance. Data frequency distributions and inter-variable relationships should be routinely considered in threat avoidance studies, especially if sample variables exhibit non-normal frequency distributions and nonlinear associations.

Practical implications

Gender was significantly associated with threat avoidance motivation and avoidance behavior and exhibited notable associations with antecedents of avoidance motivation. Related insights can inform the design and delivery of training content relating to technology threat avoidance as organizations strive to more effectively leverage information technology end-users as protective assets for the enterprise.

Originality/value

The uniqueness of this study derives from its focus and findings regarding the moderating effects of gender on technology threat avoidance factors and techniques used to measure and evaluate the associations between them.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

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