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Book part
Publication date: 17 March 2010

Daniel Jason Potter

Purpose – Child abuse is widely accepted as having a negative effect on children's academic achievement. It is less clear why this relationship exists. Current…

Abstract

Purpose – Child abuse is widely accepted as having a negative effect on children's academic achievement. It is less clear why this relationship exists. Current explanations of the abuse-academic achievement connection rely on psychological theories that overlook the impact the abuse has on children's developmentally relevant social circumstances.

Methodology/approach – Using data from the National Survey of Adolescents (NSA), a nationally representative sample of youth between the ages of 12 and 17 years old, a social capital perspective is implemented to show how abuse impacts academic achievement.

Findings – Children victimized by physical or sexual abuse are more likely to join deviant peer groups, which in turn leads to increased levels of delinquent behavior by the individual. Both the “negative” social capital of the peer group and the deviant individual behaviors explain away much of the disparity in performance between abused and non-abused children and contribute to the overall understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the effects of abuse.

Originality/value of chapter – These findings provide evidence of the impact abuse can have on children's well-being and outlines social mechanisms that connect abuse victimization to children's outcomes.

Details

Children and Youth Speak for Themselves
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-735-6

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Aaron W. Clopton

This article attempts to contribute to the body of knowledge regarding the value of social networks, or social capital, within the group process towards group and team…

Abstract

Purpose

This article attempts to contribute to the body of knowledge regarding the value of social networks, or social capital, within the group process towards group and team performance by exploring the explicit contribution of social capital towards a group or team's performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The research views the potential contribution of social capital through the perspective of the resource‐based view of organizations, where social capital's unique potential contribution to the organization's competitive advantage is highlighted. Data were collected from undergraduate student‐athletes (n=570) from 23 NCAA colleges and universities across the USA using a multiple hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

Results show a significant connection between social capital and team performance. This contribution is above and beyond other input and process variables, such as past team performance.

Research limitations/implications

Data were limited to a cross‐sectional view of social capital and team performance. Results, however, support past theoretical models where social capital maintains a significant presence in overall group effectiveness.

Originality/value

While social capital has been connected to team performance conceptually, few research studies have made this connection explicit. This article provides justification for maintaining social capital as a viable and ubiquitous element to the dynamic group process. Findings here also provide additional support for re‐examining social capital as significant contributor to a firm's competitive advantage.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2007

Thomas J. Zagenczyk, Audrey J. Murrell and Ray Gibney

The aim of this article is to examine how office designs influence social capital or the value inherent in relationships. More specifically, this article attempts to…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to examine how office designs influence social capital or the value inherent in relationships. More specifically, this article attempts to better understand the level to which the value of social capital accrues, either to the individual or to the group.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review theoretical and empirical research on the physical work environment and social capital to develop propositions that relate the effects of open office environments on the development of group‐ and individual‐level social capital.

Findings

It is argued that an open‐office environment, defined as an office design that attempts to maximize functional communication among organization members by removing physical barriers that hinder the flow of work and communications, can positively affect the development of social capital within an organization. Specifically, it is suggested that open office designs will foster the development of group‐level social capital (i.e. social capital that benefits the group, the result of network closure) but reduce individual‐level social capital (i.e. social capital that benefits individuals who connect otherwise unconnected groups in the network, or structural holes).

Practical implications

By effectively managing the physical work environment, organizations can better control and/or influence the frequency and nature of interactions between employees, which may result in desirable outcomes for both the organization and employees.

Originality/value

The article integrates two streams of literature – social capital and physical work environment – and will be of interest to researchers in both literature groups. In addition, office managers and designers can benefit from the discussion in an effort to foster group level social capital.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Megan Godwin, Judy Drennan and Josephine Previte

The purpose of this paper is to explore the meso-level social forces that influence moderate drinking in young women’s friendship groups through the application of social

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the meso-level social forces that influence moderate drinking in young women’s friendship groups through the application of social capital theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative inquiry was undertaken utilising peer-paired and small focus groups to explore young women’s drinking choices within their existing friendship groups. Guided by emic and etic perspectives, friendship groups were analysed to inform archetypical representations that illustrate group-level social capital exchanges.

Findings

The approach led to identifying four social capital and drinking archetypes. These archetypes indicate social capital-led “influencers” and “followers” and highlight the displays of capital practised by young women in alcohol consumption contexts.

Research limitations/implications

The social marketing insight drawn from this study of young women’s drinking behaviours will inform social marketers on future strategic directions about how they can use alternative methods to segment the social market of young female drinkers and develop value propositions that will motivate them towards adopting or maintaining moderate drinking practices.

Originality/value

This study contributes to social marketing theory by demonstrating the worth of social capital theory as an alternative lens for social marketers to apply in explorations of group influences that shape behaviour. The research findings in the paper demonstrate how deeper theorisation provides rich insight into the meso-level, complex behavioural influence which effect young women’s alcohol consumption.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Bhawani Singh Rathore

– The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the role of social capital in a microfinance contract.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the role of social capital in a microfinance contract.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic review of the theoretical and empirical literature on the role of social capital in microfinance.

Findings

The theoretical literature has shown using models of peer selection, peer monitoring and peer pressure that group lending with joint liability overcomes both the informational and enforcement failures present in credit markets for poor. However findings from the empirical literature conclude that social capital should not be taken as a single concept but should be considered in light of its different aspects which may be having different effects on the performance. For example, the trust between the borrowers, cultural and social homogeneity has been found to have more significant affect on repayment performance in contrast to the incentives due to peer pressure. The groups formed by family members and relatives are consistently been reported to have weakening influence on repayment.

Practical implications

For a same program the effect of social capital on performance can be different for different geographies and different classification of subjects and thus should be studied before initiating a microfinance program in any social setting.

Social implications

The borrowers should be encouraged to form groups with others who are more trustworthy and not with those they are just having an acquaintance with. The borrowers should be encouraged to come to aid of those who are victims of negative externalities. The positive experiences will lead to reciprocity of actions in future. The borrowers should be discouraged to form groups with family members and relatives.

Originality/value

It analyzes both theoretical and empirical literature by disentangling different aspects of social capital within groups and their effects on group performance.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 42 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

W. Randy Evans and Charles M. Carson

Functional diversity research has resulted in equivocal findings for group performance suggesting the need for theoretical clarification. A review of previous functional…

Abstract

Purpose

Functional diversity research has resulted in equivocal findings for group performance suggesting the need for theoretical clarification. A review of previous functional diversity research indicates that high quality productive relationships are a key determinant in the performance of cognitively diverse groups. A theoretical framework is provided that demonstrates that assets embedded in the social structure of group member relationships impact group performance. The primary goal of this paper is to consider the concept of social capital at the group level and explain its role in mentoring the relationship between functional diversity and group performance

Design/methodology/approach

These concepts are supported by prior studies and theoretical development rather than empirical evidence.

Findings

Social capital is introduced as a moderator in the group performance model improving the group processes of communication, social integration, and coordination. Enhanced group processes in turn lead to elevated group performance. It is argued that social capital offers promise for understanding and improving the performance of functionally diverse groups.

Originality/value

This paper offers a bridge between the diversity‐group performance relationship. This bridge, social capital, offers a new and exciting means of further examining these key relationships.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Wei-Li Wu and Yi-Chih Lee

Although the work group is the main context for knowledge exchange and combination in today’s organizations, few knowledge-sharing studies have been conducted at the group

Abstract

Purpose

Although the work group is the main context for knowledge exchange and combination in today’s organizations, few knowledge-sharing studies have been conducted at the group level. The purpose of this paper is to apply the concept of group social capital to determine how to promote knowledge sharing at the group level. The authors divided group social capital into two segments, conduits and resources, and argue that different group social capital conduits (i.e. work design in this study) lead to varied resources, which subsequently influence group knowledge sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, group social capital conduits included social interaction and task interdependence, and group social capital resources included group trust and a supportive climate for knowledge sharing. The authors conducted a survey on work groups in the high-tech industry using a sample of 86 work groups.

Findings

The results indicated that social interaction in a work group was positively related to group trust and that task interdependence was positively related to group trust and a supportive climate for knowledge sharing. Furthermore, group trust and a supportive climate for knowledge sharing were both found to have an influence on knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

Applying the concept of group social capital, this paper is the first research to discuss how group social capital conduits and resources influence knowledge sharing. The results of this study lead us to a better understand the relationship between group social capital and knowledge sharing.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Abul Hassan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the growth of Islamic microfinance (bila sudi-qardh) scheme in Andaman Islands and to see how Islamic microfinance sector and social

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the growth of Islamic microfinance (bila sudi-qardh) scheme in Andaman Islands and to see how Islamic microfinance sector and social capital contribute to face the challenge in poverty alleviation.

Design/methodology/approach

The researcher developed a questionnaire and conducted non-random survey with the samples of Islamic microfinance group members to examine the Islamic microfinance and cash awqaf effect for the development of the local common resources (LCRs) in general; and financial, physical capital as well as social and human capital effects of the group members in particular.

Findings

This study found that collective action through Islamic microfinance groups actually helps to increase environmental awareness, economic betterment of the members and fruitful management of LCRs through Islamic microfinance.

Research limitations/implications

The paper's findings are limited to the Islamic microfinance groups' management in Andaman Islands in India.

Originality/value

The paper explores social, financial and physical capital effects such as environmental awareness, economic upliftment of the Islamic microfinance groups' members and potential for LCR management through united action of the groups.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Nathan W. Pino

This paper argues for the utilization of the social capital concept in studying, evaluating, or implementing community oriented policing (COP) strategies. Social capital

Abstract

This paper argues for the utilization of the social capital concept in studying, evaluating, or implementing community oriented policing (COP) strategies. Social capital is helpful in measuring COP implementation effectiveness because it is central to COP issues such as trust and genuine dialogue between different groups, the ability to collectively tap into various resources, and the ability of individuals to work together to solve various problems. Findings from a study conducted in Iowa utilizing focus group and interview methodology demonstrate that COP cannot be successful without the existence of social capital building among and between the citizenry, the police, and other public and private organizations.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2020

Mudit Kumar Singh and Jaemin Lee

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the inequality perpetuated through social categories in accessing the social capital generated through the microfinance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the inequality perpetuated through social categories in accessing the social capital generated through the microfinance interventions in India as the country has pronounced economic inequality by social categories like many developing stratified societies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses survey data collected from 75 villages in rural India and tests whether the formation and maximization of social capital through self-help groups (SHGs) is dominated by social categories, e.g. high-caste groups, males and superior occupation classes. Using logistic regression framework, the study assesses the formation and maximization of social capital through multiple SHG membership.

Findings

The paper finds that the microfinance approach of empowering weaker sections is considerably limited in its success, in the sense that it provides them with the opportunity to the credit access and support through SHGs. But, the empirical model further indicates that social capital in form of these SHGs may fall prey to the dominant social categories, and thus, these institutions may potentially enhance inequality.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is derived from the secondary data set, so it is unable to comment field reality qualitatively.

Practical implications

Microfinance policy makers will have an improved understanding of inherent social inequalities while implementing group-based programs in socially stratified societies.

Originality/value

Social capital, if treated as an outcome accumulated in form of groups, provides with an important framework to assess the unequal access through the microfinance interventions. Overlooking the inherent unequal access will deceive the purpose of social justice in the group-based interventions. The microfinance and other welfare policies engaged in group formation and generating the social capital need to be more sensitive to the disadvantageous sections while focusing on multiple group access by disadvantaged social groups.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 40 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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