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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Johanna Moisander and Sinikka Pesonen

This paper discusses the representation of “green consumerism” in the prevalent institutionalised discourses of green consumerism, and in the self‐narratives of people who…

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Abstract

This paper discusses the representation of “green consumerism” in the prevalent institutionalised discourses of green consumerism, and in the self‐narratives of people who identify themselves as ecologically oriented citizens, focusing on the construction of the self and the other in these texts. The aim is to investigate the ways in which “radical” ecologically oriented citizens, who are largely “marginalised” and positioned as the other in the dominant discourses of green consumerism, engage in resistance towards western, materialistic consumption culture. Drawing from the Foucauldian ideas of political struggle as the “politics of the self”, and personal ethics and moral agency as a mode of self‐formation, this paper analyses the ways in which these “green consumers” reject their received subjectivity as consumers. The focus is on the practices of self, and on the ways in which they invent and promote new forms of subjectivity that are more in line with their environmentalist ideology.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Mirela Holy, Marija Geiger Zeman and Zdenko Zeman

Purpose: This paper aims to present the case study of the SHE (Šibenik Hub for Ecology) hub project, ecofeminist business practice in Croatia. The SHE hub is a sustainable…

Abstract

Purpose: This paper aims to present the case study of the SHE (Šibenik Hub for Ecology) hub project, ecofeminist business practice in Croatia. The SHE hub is a sustainable tourism project based around issues of ‘ethical consumerism’ and sustainable development and shows that is possible to implement ecofeminist ideas in business.

Method: Paper is divided into two parts. The first part is theoretical and presents an overview of relevant literature regarding ecofeminism, sustainable development, corporate social responsibility and green consumerism. The second part is a case study of the SHE hub project, based on analysis of the project website, content analysis of the media coverage regarding the project and an in-depth interview with project initiator.

Findings: The results show that strengthening of the ethical consumerism movement has given a new impetus to the realisation of ecofeminist projects in real life and that SHE hub is a good example of this. Although the SHE hub has insufficient transformative social potential, it is important to notice that sustainable change always begins with small steps.

Originality/value: The topic of the relationship between social corporate responsibility and ecofeminism has not been researched, so this case study represents a valuable contribution to the research of this relationship.

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Jana Nekesa Knibb and Kimberly Taylor

This paper aims to understand the meanings, motivations and practices of green motherhood and, in particular, how green mothers incorporate this lifestyle into their…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand the meanings, motivations and practices of green motherhood and, in particular, how green mothers incorporate this lifestyle into their consumption practices.

Design/methodology/approach

To address the research questions, a survey and focus group were conducted. Survey responses and transcribed focus group statements comprise the data.

Findings

Several variables explain the adoption of green motherhood for one consumer segment. Results showed the mothers’ greater concern about their own family’s health and safety, and a desire to reduce risk and gain some control over their world, rather than concern about the environment at large, drives their choices.

Research limitations/implications

The paper identifies and explores the consumption and mothering practices of a segment of “light green” moms and uncovers their motivations. Limitations include relatively small sample sizes.

Practical/implications

Green mothers” are an important, emerging segment of green consumers, but they often face conflicting roles and expectations. The research adds to the literature on green consumerism by expanding the authors’ knowledge of the nuances and limitations of the green motherhood movement and delving deeper into the decision processes these mothers use. This information can help marketers seeking to target this segment with easy-to-use, convenient products which appeal to their concerns about controlling their environment and improving their family’s health.

Practical/implications

Understanding green consumption practices can help marketers or governmental organizations reach consumers who are motivated to be “green”, which, in turn, can lead to an improved environment.

Originality/value

The identification of the “light green” consumer segment is novel, and the paper uses a unique mixed methods approach. Greater understanding of the meaning and limitations of green motherhood is obtained.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Sidharth Muralidharan and Fei Xue

Millennials, an understudied segment of the sustainable market, are enthusiastic about adopting greener lifestyles but fail to translate pro-environmental attitudes to…

2585

Abstract

Purpose

Millennials, an understudied segment of the sustainable market, are enthusiastic about adopting greener lifestyles but fail to translate pro-environmental attitudes to actual behavior, thus understanding factors that motivate their actual purchase of green products is imperative. Using the consumer socialization framework, the researchers studied the impacts of social structural variables (i.e. age, gender, education and family structure), socialization agents (i.e. family, peers and mass media) and environmental concern on the buying behaviors of millennials from two of the world’s most populous nations: India and China.

Design/methodology/approach

Using online panels (Amazon M-Turk and sojump.com), online surveys were administered to an online sample of millennials aged 18-24 years from India (n = 253) and China (n = 255).

Findings

Hierarchical regressions showed that peer communication predominantly influenced green buying behavior of millennials from India, while family communication was most important to Chinese millennials. Environmental concern, an attitudinal outcome, directly impacted behavior and also mediated the relationship between significant socialization agents and buying behavior in both countries.

Practical implications

Considering the importance given to peers (India) and family (China), green marketers have to use specialized strategies when marketing their products to millennials in India and China. Instead of focusing on mass media campaigns, the study highlights the importance of “personal” social networks to curb the environmental issues plaguing their respective countries.

Originality/value

The current study extends the literature on millennials’ green consumer behavior by exploring millennials in India and China. The consumer socialization framework has not been applied to countries like India and China, and to understand green consumerism, the role played by influential agents such as family and peers in these collectivistic cultures and their potential to change green attitudes and behavior warrants further exploration. The possibility of mediating effects has been represented by weak correlations between socio-demographic and psychological factors. Using the consumer socialization framework, the current study explores environmental concern (EC) as a mediator in the model.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Carolyn Strong

Consumers of the 1990s are claimed to be caring, environmentally and socially aware and are demanding a say in the production, processing and resourcing of the products…

16413

Abstract

Consumers of the 1990s are claimed to be caring, environmentally and socially aware and are demanding a say in the production, processing and resourcing of the products they regularly purchase. Hypothesizes that the environmentally‐aware consumer has become ethically aware and is joined by many other consumers who believe in the principles of fair trade. The increasingly well‐informed consumer is not only demanding fairly traded products, but is challenging manufacturers and retailers to guarantee the ethical claims they are making about their products. Reports on a survey to investigate the factors contributing to the development of ethical consumerism in the UK, and provides details of the integrating features which it finds. Discusses the implications of these for management.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Abstract

Details

SDG12 – Sustainable Consumption and Production: A Revolutionary Challenge for the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-102-6

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Richard Adams

Follows up an earlier article which held that consumer power wouldchange the market, forcing manufacturers and retailers to respond tosocial and ethical concerns. Shows…

Abstract

Follows up an earlier article which held that consumer power would change the market, forcing manufacturers and retailers to respond to social and ethical concerns. Shows that, in practice, the trend has been driven by industry rather than the consumer, as conscious consumerism has been hard hit by the recession of the late 1980s/early 1990s, whereas the long‐term policies initiated by industry are now coming to maturity. Considers the social implications, the cost of manufacturers and discusses recent research which gives a confusing picture of the degree to which companies have accepted and are acting on their social responsibilities. Suggests that only the top 25 corporations have set a really strong lead. Discusses the proposed introduction of the Fairtrade Mark at the end of 1993 which will indicate that a product has been assessed against social and environmental criteria and conforms to a high standard which provides genuine benefits to poor products.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 95 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2021

Pooja Mehta and Harpreet Singh Chahal

Over the last few decades, there has been a substantial increase in environmentally conscious consumers' willingness to switch their preferences from mainstream products…

1207

Abstract

Purpose

Over the last few decades, there has been a substantial increase in environmentally conscious consumers' willingness to switch their preferences from mainstream products to green products. Hence, it becomes essential for academicians and marketers to understand the notion, attributes and a comprehensive profile of green consumers. Since consumer attitude towards green products is not widely studied in developing countries, the present study aims at exploring the profile of green consumers in India (Punjab State) based on the same in the Indian context.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used the survey method, and a sample of 400 respondents was selected from the Punjab State of India. Initially, principal component analysis was employed to reduce the dimensions. Following this, cluster analysis was applied to segment consumer market in distinctive segments. Results of cluster analysis were validated with discriminant analysis and finally, differences amongst the segments of green and non-green consumers were examined to build on the profile of green consumers.

Findings

The study segmented the consumer market based on consumer attitude towards green products. Results of the study revealed four distinct segments. “Dynamic Green”, the largest cluster, presents truly green consumers who exhibit a positive attitude towards green products. Finally, the study highlighted the attitudinal profile of green and non-green consumers and differences amongst the segments were explained.

Research limitations/implications

Similar study should be conducted in other developing/developed countries. Furthermore, cross-cultural studies can be undertaken to contrast consumer attitude towards green products. The study may also be extended to probe the connection between consumers' attitude and actual behaviour towards green products.

Originality/value

The study examined the role of consumer attitude towards green products in identifying the distinct segment of green consumers and determining different configurations of consumer characteristics to build on the profile of green consumers.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Nicole Bieak Kreidler and Sacha Joseph‐Mathews

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the idea of green atmospherics and propose a conceptual framework for green service environment factors and a typology for green

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the idea of green atmospherics and propose a conceptual framework for green service environment factors and a typology for green consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes the form of a conceptual piece. and offers a new approach to green consumerism. Green atmospherics goes beyond many of the typical factors explored in previous service environment studies. The paper examines how many terms commonplace in the design and architectural literature can be translated into the marketing arena. Factors such as daylighting, recycling, offgassing, insulation, optimal energy performance and design for the environment are discussed.

Findings

The paper proposes that “going green” goes beyond having recyclable or even sustainable products, to an ideology that incorporates improving worker morale and retention, and giving back to the communities they are located in. Additionally, the paper makes a case for classifying green consumers based on a psychographic segmentation approach compared to the more traditional socioeconomic classification.

Originality/value

This paper offers a conceptual framework for assessing green atmospherics within service environments and proposes a green consumer typology that references “stimuli” versus “socio‐demographics” for categorization. A new categorization is proposed and the importance of this topic to consumers, practitioners and researchers are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 December 2021

Deepak Jaiswal, Bhagwan Singh, Rishi Kant and Abhijeet Biswas

Consumers are becoming increasingly concerned about ecological degradation and are getting conscious of the potential advantages that environmental sustainability can…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumers are becoming increasingly concerned about ecological degradation and are getting conscious of the potential advantages that environmental sustainability can offer, which is also driving them towards the consumption of green products. In view of this, the purpose of this study is to operationalize and test the conceptual model of green purchasing behaviour by incorporating consumers’ perception towards green marketing stimuli including eco-label, eco-brand and environmental advertisements with perceived environmental knowledge in an emerging sustainable market.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model is based on an integrative and cognitive approach to consumers’ environmental beliefs-behaviour relationship. The 549 valid responses were received from selected metropolitan regions of India and analysed by direct path coefficients along with a bootstrapping method for testing indirect effects.

Findings

The results revealed that perception of eco-label and environmental advertisements had a positive influence on green purchasing behaviour, however, the direct relationships of eco-brand and environmental knowledge were not supported in the model. While environmental advertisements and environmental knowledge posed an indirect influence on green purchasing to some extent.

Research limitations/implications

The generalizability of the findings needs to augment an extensive approach of a cross-sectional survey. Theoretical, managerial and policy implications were recommended to promote green products towards sustainable consumption.

Originality/value

The operationalization of green purchasing behaviour using marketing stimuli has remained scant in the Indian setting. The insights gained from this study contributes to the knowledge domain of green consumer psychology in the backdrop of an emerging market.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

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