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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

George Kofi Amoako, Joshua Kofi Doe and Robert Kwame Dzogbenuku

This study aims to establish the link between business ethics and brand loyalty and to investigate the mediating role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and United…

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1089

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to establish the link between business ethics and brand loyalty and to investigate the mediating role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) such as green marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the purposive sampling technique, data were obtained from 622 middle-income city dwellers who shop at leading retail malls. Data were analyzed with partial least square–structural equation model.

Findings

The study found a positive and significant relationship between business ethics, CSR, green marketing and business loyalty. Both CSR and green marketing mediate between perceived firm ethicality and brand loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

This research was done based on general knowledge of business ethics, CSR and green marketing from the consumers’ perspective. Future studies can avoid this limitation.

Practical implications

By ensuring ethical codes, CSR and green marketing, firms can contribute to promoting the SDGs, and at the same time, achieving customer loyalty. Brand loyalty is further enhanced if customers see a firm to be practicing CSR.

Social implications

The SDGs of sustainable production patterns, climate change and its impacts, and sustainably using water resources must become the focus of companies as they ultimately yield loyalty. Policymakers and society can design a policy to facilitate adoption of better ethical behavior and green marketing by firms as a way of promoting SDGs.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to test the mediation effect of green marketing and CSR on how ethical behavior leads to brand loyalty. It is also one of the few papers to examine how SDGs can be promoted by businesses as stakeholders.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Jialing Lin, Antonio Lobo and Civilai Leckie

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the formation of green brand image through customers’ perceptions of the functional and emotional benefits associated with green

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5005

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the formation of green brand image through customers’ perceptions of the functional and emotional benefits associated with green brands and the influence of green brand image on purchase behavioural response. Additionally, the influence of a moderating variable (green perceived risk) on this formation process is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using an online survey administered to a consumer panel in China. Structural equation modelling was used to test the conceptual model.

Findings

The results demonstrate that the provision of utilitarian benefits and self-expressive benefits directly enhance the brand’s green image. Also, utilitarian benefits and green brand image have direct influences on green brand loyalty. Green perceived risk negatively moderates the relationship between utilitarian benefits and green brand image.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends previous research by examining the development of green brand image and investigating the moderating role of green perceived risk in this process. Also, this study enriches research on green brand and corporate branding by investigating the relationship between green brand image and brand loyalty.

Originality/value

Although previous research has examined how perceived benefits influence the development of corporate brand image, the issue has not been investigated from a green branding perspective. Moreover, the moderating role of green perceived risk in the formation of green brand image has not been explored, despite the concerns relating to greenwash which have been raised in several green brand studies. Finally, green brand image was found to be a strong antecedent of brand loyalty, besides the predominant elements of green trust and green satisfaction.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Jialing (Catherine) Lin, Zhimin Zhou and Civilai Leckie

This study aims to empirically investigate how green transparency and green competence enhancement can promote consumer behavioral outcomes (i.e. green brand loyalty and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically investigate how green transparency and green competence enhancement can promote consumer behavioral outcomes (i.e. green brand loyalty and resistance to negative information regarding green brands) through green brand attachment (i.e., self–green brand connection and green brand prominence). It further explores these hypothesized relationships across brands of physical products and services.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using an online survey from 826 Chinese consumers. Structural equation modeling is used to test the proposed conceptual model.

Findings

Our results demonstrate that green transparency and green competence enhancement positively affect consumer green brand attachment (i.e. self–green brand connection and green brand prominence) which subsequently influence consumers’ loyalty toward green brands and their resistance to negative information. Finally, the development of green brand attachment across brands of products and services is found to be different.

Research limitations/implications

Extending the conceptual model to other cultural contexts is suggested. Using the experimental design to examine other boundary conditions is recommended.

Practical implications

This study provides recommendations for marketers, especially brand managers, to facilitate green brand communications to strengthen consumer–brand relationships.

Originality/value

This study extends past research by examining two types of green brand attachment via a cognitive schema lens. Also, it shows the internal cognitive process by which green brand communications potentially promote consumer behavioral outcomes through green brand attachment. Lastly, it highlights differences in the development of green brand loyalty and consumer resistance to negative information across brands of products and services.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Ana Brochado and Fernando Oliveira

This paper aims to examine the main determinants of brand equity in the context of brands defined by their region of origin, as is the case for Portuguese green wine.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the main determinants of brand equity in the context of brands defined by their region of origin, as is the case for Portuguese green wine.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a sample of wine consumers in Portugal through personal interviews (N = 200). Structural equation modelling was then applied to study the causal relationships between brand equity and its dimensions (i.e. brand loyalty, brand awareness, perceived quality and brand association) for top-of-mind green wine brands, based on Aaker’s conceptual Framework (Aaker, 1991).

Findings

The study’s results reveal that brand loyalty is the most influential dimension of brand equity for Portuguese green wine and that the links between brand equity and both brand association and perceived quality are significant. These findings can help Portuguese wineries to prioritise – and allocate resources across – brand equity dimensions.

Originality/value

Although the literature identifies dimensions of brand equity in other industries, the literature on the wine market is still sparse. This study, therefore, contributes to expanding this body of knowledge.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Yoon Jung Jang

This study aims to examine the impact of green atmospheric and communicative servicescape dimensions on customers’ emotional and behavioral outcomes and explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of green atmospheric and communicative servicescape dimensions on customers’ emotional and behavioral outcomes and explores the moderating effect of customer familiarity.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from coffee shop customers in the USA. Structural equation modeling and a multigroup analysis were used for analysis.

Findings

The findings indicated that the atmospheric dimensions of green coffee shops have a greater impact than communicative dimensions on customers’ green place attachment and loyalty. However, the effects of green servicescape depend on customer familiarity. The impact of the communicative servicescape on customers’ attachment and loyalty is significantly greater in a high-familiarity group than in a low-familiarity group.

Practical implications

The findings provide coffee shop managers with insights into effective design of a green service environment. Although managers focus on both dimensions, they may use customer familiarity as a segmenting or targeting tool in designing the green service environment and developing a sustained relationship with customers with different levels of familiarity.

Originality/value

This study extends the existing servicescape models by incorporating green place attachment as a construct to comprehend customers’ inner evaluations. It also contributes to the literature on attachment by demonstrating the clear linkage between both green servicescape dimensions and place attachment. This study highlights customer familiarity construct that should be a critical issue in advancing the understanding of customer behavior in the green servicescape context.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2019

Erifili Papista and Sergios Dimitriadis

The study aims to develop and test a relationship-building model for green brands. It synthesizes findings on the consumer motives offered by green brands, with…

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2925

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to develop and test a relationship-building model for green brands. It synthesizes findings on the consumer motives offered by green brands, with relationship marketing and branding literature to the specific context of green brands to build a parsimonious model testing the links amongst four relational benefits, i.e. confidence, socialization, self-expression and altruism; two relational mediators, i.e. satisfaction and relationship quality; three behavioural outcomes, i.e. word-of-mouth, expectation of continuity and cross-buying; and two moderators of the benefits-mediators relationship, i.e. environmental consciousness and relationship length.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected from consumers of three brands of natural cosmetic products, totalling 848 questionnaires. Structural equation modelling is used to test the hypothesized relationships across the three brands.

Findings

The results show that confidence benefit has the strongest influence on relationship quality, followed by self-expression and altruism. Relationships quality and satisfaction with the green brand have a significant impact on all three behavioural outcomes. Both environmental consciousness and length of the relationship moderate the hypothesized interrelationships.

Research limitations/implications

A new set of relational benefits for the green context is suggested. Several future research opportunities are suggested.

Practical implications

The study offers suggestions for managers to leverage relationship benefits for relationship strengthening.

Originality/value

No previous work has studied in an integrated way the relationship benefits and mediators to model the consumer–green brand relationship. The study provides a better understanding of the antecedents of consumer loyalty towards green brands.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2020

George Kofi Amoako, Robert Kwame Dzogbenuku, Joshua Doe and Geoffrey Kwasi Adjaison

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how consumers in emerging market respond to sustainable development goals initiatives by marketers and firms. The study seeks…

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1419

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how consumers in emerging market respond to sustainable development goals initiatives by marketers and firms. The study seeks to identify how sustainable marketing strategies contribute to attaining the SDGs in Ghana, a developing and emerging country in sub-Saharan Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

A positivist methodological framework was used for the collection of data, analysis and theoretical development in this research. A total of 780 questionnaires were handed out. Out of this number, a total of 650 were returned. However, due to missing values, 622 valid responses were used for analysis. Of the valid responses, 306 (about 49.23%) were males while 316 were females, representing about 50.8%. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse data and investigate the relationship amongst advertising, packaging, pricing, green marketing strategies and purchasing behaviour.

Findings

Study findings provide insight into how marketing strategies affect consumer purchasing decisions and brand loyalty. Findings revealed positive relationship between green marketing and purchase behaviour. Empirical results from this study also confirm the mediating role of price on the relationship between green marketing strategies and purchase behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

While this study is limited to a single country Ghana, the findings can have far-reaching implications for many countries in the emerging markets sector. The study provides a vivid illustration of how environmental concerns can affect consumers' attitude towards products or services.

Practical implications

Policy on environmental issues can be developed from this study. Marketers can be more effective at how to effect consumer behaviour using findings from this research.

Social implications

Firms employing green marketing strategies must be aware of the importance the youth places on sustainability and develop strategies that enhance social acceptance by the youth.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge, sustainable and environmental issues have been researched on, but pricing and advertising have not been used as a mediating variable on purchasing behaviour in Ghana. Moreover investigation of green marketing strategies and purchase behaviour, advertising packaging and brand loyalty using structural equation modelling analysis within the Ghanaian public space is unique.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2021

Pedro Cuesta-Valiño, Pablo Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, María-Pilar Sierra-Fernández and María-Belén Aguirre García

This study analyses the dimensions of the brand equity of organic agri-food products using a multidimensional approach. It also examines the direct and indirect…

Abstract

Purpose

This study analyses the dimensions of the brand equity of organic agri-food products using a multidimensional approach. It also examines the direct and indirect relationships of this brand equity with consumers’ green satisfaction and the green image of organic agri-food products. The green brand can be understood as a tool for entrepreneurial development.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers develop a conceptual framework highlighting the dimensions of the green brand equity focusing on five constructs (green brand loyalty, green perceived quality, green brand associations, green brand awareness and the new dimension of green brand emotion), green satisfaction and green brand image. The sample consisted of 392 people aged over 18 who were occasional or habitual consumers of organic agri-food products. Partial least squares (PLS), a structural equation modelling (SEM) tool, was used in the analyses.

Findings

The results of this study show that the different dimensions of green brand equity (except for green brand awareness) reflect this variable and are important factors in its perception by consumers. This study differs from others in that it treats green brand equity as a truly multidimensional variable made up of different dimensions with different measurement scales. The study also demonstrates the importance of green satisfaction and green brand image as antecedents of green brand equity.

Practical implications

The measurement scale for green brand equity developed in this study provides entrepreneurs of organic agri-foods with a method for evaluating consumer perception of green brand equity based on those dimensions that are truly significant.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore the relationships of green brand equity—as a multidimensional concept—with other variables, such as green satisfaction and green image.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Rasoul Mehdikhani and Changiz Valmohammadi

This study aims to investigate the effects of green brand equity (GBE) on green brand attachment (GBA), green self-brand connection (GSBC), green brand attitude (GBAT) and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effects of green brand equity (GBE) on green brand attachment (GBA), green self-brand connection (GSBC), green brand attitude (GBAT) and green word of mouth (GWOM). Moreover, the mediating role of three main factors, namely, GBA, GSBC and GBAT.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an in-depth review of the relevant literature, a conceptual model was developed and a questionnaire was designed. Out of 600 distributed questionnaires among customers of disposable tableware brands in Tehran, 265 questionnaires were returned. Data were analyzed for measuring the proposed model using the structural equation modeling technique.

Findings

The obtained results showed that GBE has positive impacts on GBA, GSBC, GBAT and GWOM. GBA, GSBC and GBAT have positive impacts on GWOM. Also, GBA, GSBC and GBA partially mediate the relationship between GBE and GWOM.

Research limitations

This study has been done in the context of Iran, so caution should be taken to generalize the results.

Practical implications

This study provides a clear insight for brand managers and marketers about the mechanism of enhancing green signals, which a brand can transfer to consumers through GBE. Also, the study suggests that companies should design their advertisement in a way that demonstrates the environmental responsibility of the brand and environmentally friendly features of products to increase consumer awareness of environmental concerns.

Social implications

The obtained results might increase green awareness among the people which is hoped other industries, particularly manufacturing ones make necessary efforts toward promoting the implementation of green manufacturing.

Originality/value

The results provide important environmental concepts in the field of green marketing and use sustainable development and signaling theories to enhance the attraction of disposable tableware in both business-to-business and business-to-consumer contexts. This study also adds a new concept of GSBC to the marketing literature.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2020

Dandan Wang, Thomas Walker and Sergey Barabanov

The purpose of this study is to suggest an approach to regain consumer trust after negative effects of greenwashing that draws corporations and consumers into a conflicted…

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1603

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to suggest an approach to regain consumer trust after negative effects of greenwashing that draws corporations and consumers into a conflicted relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collect and interpret qualitative data from in-depth interviews to develop a theoretical approach that enables the rebuilding of trust between greenwashing corporations and their consumers using the concept of psychological resilience.

Findings

This analysis indicates that the approach is an interaction between consumers with green brand loyalty and greenwashing corporations. This type of consumer demands emotional factors, functional factors and legitimate factors in the process of psychological resilience, and after greenwashing, corporations should select appropriate recovery strategies to stimulate these protective factors.

Originality/value

Previous research studied green consumer trust in the marketing field but did not explore the core of trust which was regarded as a cognitive process. This paper investigates green consumer behaviour under the perspective of psychological resilience and makes an innovative attempt to understand drivers of regaining consumer trust. Previous research works put forward a series of strategies related to regaining trust, but they did not discuss the mechanisms by which these strategies work. Using the method of grounded theory, we attempt to reveal the “black box” of consumers cognition after greenwashing and propose a strategy for regaining consumer trust.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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