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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Anne Trebilcock

Examines the effects of economic structural adjustment programmes on employers and workers. Advocates a tripartite consultation approach whereby workers’ and employers…

Abstract

Examines the effects of economic structural adjustment programmes on employers and workers. Advocates a tripartite consultation approach whereby workers’ and employers’ representatives are encouraged to participate alongside governments in economic and social policy formulation, from an early stage. Discusses the results of five case studies carried out by the ILO to assess the extent of tripartite co‐operation in Argentina, India, Mexico, the Philippines and Zambia. Concludes that the nature of tripartite consultation greatly reflects the type of labour relations system ‐ corporatist, pluralistic or emergent ‐ in a particular country. Makes suggestions for future improvements to the whole structural adjustment process.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Book part
Publication date: 23 April 2018

David Seth Jones

This chapter discusses reforms to increase customer-centredness, public consultation (including professional, business and community associations), whole-of-government

Abstract

This chapter discusses reforms to increase customer-centredness, public consultation (including professional, business and community associations), whole-of-government approaches (a case of trafficking in persons), increased budget, personnel and procurement delegation to departments and increased role of statutory boards (autonomous agencies). According to the author the driving force behind public sector reforms emanates from the inner core of ministers, most particularly the prime minister and deputy prime minister, working in close conjunction with senior permanent secretaries, directors of boards and government-linked companies. In Singapore, power is concentrated in the hands of political executives and senior levels of civil service. Ministers set the policy agenda and make final policy decisions on important issues. The administrative service is the elite service (of about 250 persons) within the civil service that shapes policy, especially permanent secretaries and deputy secretaries. Objections to reforms are often avoided through inputs to the reform process by key stakeholders and experts of relevant fields from inter-ministerial and inter-agency committees and through public consultations. Singapore has achieved an exceptional level of prosperity, and according to the author civil service is guided by practices of meritocracy (e.g., in promotion) and strict accountability through audits and anti-corruption steps.

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Leadership and Public Sector Reform in Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-309-0

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Caroline Norrie, Jill Manthorpe, Stephen Martineau and Martin Stevens

Whether social workers should have a power of entry in cases where individuals seem to be hindering safeguarding enquiries for community-dwelling adults at risk is a…

Abstract

Purpose

Whether social workers should have a power of entry in cases where individuals seem to be hindering safeguarding enquiries for community-dwelling adults at risk is a topical question in England. The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a re-examination of relevant sections of the 2012 Government Safeguarding Power of Entry Consultation.

Design/methodology/approach

Re-analysis of responses to question three of the 2012 Government’s Safeguarding Power of Entry Consultation was undertaken in late 2015-early 2016. The consultation submissions were located and searched for information on views of the prevalence of the situations where access to an adult at risk (with decision-making capacity) is being hindered by a third party and the nature of examples where a new power of entry might be considered appropriate by consultation respondents.

Findings

The majority of respondents to the consultation generally reported that situations when a new power of entry would be required were not encountered regularly; however a minority of respondents stated these situations occurred more frequently. Examples of situations where third parties appeared to be hindering access were given across the different categories of adults at risk and types of abuse and current practices were described. Respondents observed that the risks of excessive or inappropriate use of any new powers needed to be considered carefully.

Originality/value

This re-analysis sheds light on the prevalence and circumstances of the problems encountered about access to adults at risk. The legal framework of adult safeguarding continues to be of interest to policy makers, researchers and practitioners.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2020

Julinda Hoxha

While Chapter 3 highlights contextual conditions that foster the formation of policy networks, Chapter 5 highlights contextual conditions that impede the formation of…

Abstract

While Chapter 3 highlights contextual conditions that foster the formation of policy networks, Chapter 5 highlights contextual conditions that impede the formation of policy networks. The overarching question of this chapter is the following: What are the factors that hinder cross-sectoral arrangements from becoming collaborative in complex policy settings such as low- and middle-income countries with a tradition in centralized policy making? In an attempt to address this question, this study provides a detailed assessment of all cross-sectoral arrangements within the Turkish health sector focusing on the post-2003 period. Within this framework, three types of networks will be examined including (a) consultative networks where stakeholders come together primarily to legitimize certain government policies within national level health policy platforms; (b) cluster networks where stakeholder interaction falls short of becoming collaborative due to diverging interests and persistent competition at the regional level; and (c) patronage networks where governmental actors and a selected number of NGOs linked by clientelism serve as a bridge between the ruling party and its constituency at the community level. Unlike policy networks, these actor constellations observed at different levels of governance do not serve the purpose of policy collaboration. On the contrary, they have the potential to trigger politicization, fragmentation, and even polarization at the social level, especially through the distribution of selective benefits. Ultimately, this chapter aims to rise to the challenge of policy collaboration by assessing the impediments to network collaboration based on insights from the Turkish case.

Details

Network Policy Making within the Turkish Health Sector: Becoming Collaborative
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-095-5

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 16 May 2019

Courting Mexican expatriates.

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Abstract

Details

Central Bank Policy: Theory and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-751-6

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Sarah Pedersen

Abstract

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The Politicization of Mumsnet
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-468-2

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2012

Robyn Kruk

Mental health reform needs to engage leaders across jurisdictions and governments/communities. This paper aims to describe the history leading to the establishment of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Mental health reform needs to engage leaders across jurisdictions and governments/communities. This paper aims to describe the history leading to the establishment of the Australian National Mental Commission (the Commission) in 2012 and to identify opportunities/challenges in cross jurisdictional/sectoral reform of mental health services.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study is based on the observations of the author who has held lead state and national roles prior to leading the Commission. It sets the establishment of the Commission in the broader context of changing community attitudes, strong consumer/carer advocacy, increased financial support for mental health and establishment of state commissions.

Findings

Cross sectoral/jurisdictional reform needs leadership from government heads and central agencies. Risks relate to the need to effectively articulate state and national commissions and challenges accompanying multilateral stakeholders with high and often conflicting expectations, and tensions with other high priority issues that also require alignment between Federal and State leaders and agencies.

Research limitations/implications

There may be potential bias based on the perspective of the narrator, and the benefits of direct experience in multiple jurisdictions.

Practical implications

The paper identifies critical success factors in the establishment/operation of the first national Commission and the establishment of relationships with state commissions, relevant to other cross jurisdictional bodies.

Originality/value

The paper provides an insight into the factors leading to the establishment of the first national Commission and its articulation with state commissions and the early operational challenges facing cross jurisdictional reforms in changing political climates.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2019

Alicia Kubas

Since the 2016 presidential election, hyper-partisanship has become a regular facet of the political landscape with Democrats and Republicans in increasing conflict. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Since the 2016 presidential election, hyper-partisanship has become a regular facet of the political landscape with Democrats and Republicans in increasing conflict. The purpose of this paper is to determine if perception of government sources related to trust and credibility has changed since the 2016 election and if the experiences and strategies of librarians who teach or consult about government information has changed in response to this environment.

Design/methodology/approach

A 24-question survey was distributed to garner qualitative and quantitative responses from librarians who teach or consult about government information in an academic environment. A total of 122 responses were used for analysis.

Findings

Academic librarians are seeing more concern from patrons about disappearing online government information and wider distrust of government information. Librarians also noticed that the political leanings of students color their perspective around government sources and that librarians also need to keep their political beliefs in check. Respondents emphasized a need for more government literacy and information literacy topics when discussing evaluation of government sources.

Research limitations/implications

The data collection only included responses from academic librarians. Further research could include in-depth interviews and look at experiences in various library types.

Originality/value

With the timeliness of this topic, there has not been an in-depth investigation into how the Trump administration has changed user trust and perception of government sources from the librarian’s point of view. This paper continues the conversation about how librarians can address the growing distrust of government information and give us insight into the effects of a turbulent political climate on government sources.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Helen Haugh and Ana Maria Peredo

Purpose – The aim of this chapter is to analyse the discourse associated with, and preceding the establishment of, the community interest company (CIC) legal format in the…

Abstract

Purpose – The aim of this chapter is to analyse the discourse associated with, and preceding the establishment of, the community interest company (CIC) legal format in the United Kingdom in 2005. The analysis identifies the political, ideological, social and economic meta-narratives that are embedded in five key texts from which the CIC emerges and is codified.

Design, methodology and approach – The approach consists of a discourse analysis of five principal texts produced between 2002 and 2005 in which the idea of a CIC is articulated and refined prior to the launch of the CIC format in 2005.

Findings – Analysis of five key texts elucidates four meta-narratives that contrast political, ideological, social and economic discourse and counter-discourse.

Research implications and limitations – The selection of five key texts excludes other texts that were produced during the articulation and refinement of the CIC format. Further research to examine the diffusion, adoption and translation of the CIC legal format is recommended.

Practical implications – We show how the crafting of policy is embedded in meta-narratives that shape the content and implementation of policy.

Social implications – The CIC protects, in perpetuity, collectively held property rights through an asset lock, and enables capital to be raised from investors and trustees to be paid. These characteristics are beneficial in that community asset ownership can contribute to local development, e.g. by creating new ventures, generating jobs and anchoring wealth in communities; raising capital from investors can facilitate the enterprise to grow and scale up; and the expertise of the board can be enhanced by rewarding trustees financially for their involvement in the governance of the CIC.

Originality – This chapter presents the first critical analysis of the discourse associated with the origins of the idea for, and articulation of, the need for a legal format for social enterprises in the United Kingdom.

Details

The Third Sector
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-281-4

Keywords

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