Search results

1 – 10 of 149
Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Gill Salmon and Michal Tombs

The prevalence of psychiatric disorders in children and young people is increasing, leading to recommendations that medical schools re-consider their curriculum content and…

Abstract

Purpose

The prevalence of psychiatric disorders in children and young people is increasing, leading to recommendations that medical schools re-consider their curriculum content and teaching practices for child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP). The purpose of this paper is to seek guidance for undergraduate curriculum development from the wider literature on CAP curriculum content and teaching practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive search of the literature was conducted, focussing on studies that examined undergraduate teaching of CAP. In an attempt to establish whether there is an agreed level of curriculum content and teaching practices, literature from all over the world was included.

Findings

Findings suggest that curriculum content and teaching practices are varied, therefore it was difficult to identify best practice upon which recommendations can be made. In addition, despite previous calls for curriculum improvements and expansion of learning objectives, recent studies suggest that there has been little change.

Research limitations/implications

A common theme emerging was the importance of making the CAP curriculum relevant to all future doctors rather than only those who plan to specialise in CAP. Further research to determine what CAP knowledge, skills and attitudes non-psychiatrists think that medical students need to be taught is warranted.

Originality/value

This paper reviewed the literature on undergraduate CAP teaching, highlighting common themes from the wider literature on medical curriculum development to inform how CAP curricula content can be developed to equip future doctors.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Morten Steen Bondø, John Reidar Mathiassen, Petter Aaby Vebenstad, Ekrem Misimi, Eirin Marie Skjøndal Bar, Bendik Toldnes and Stein Ove Østvik

The purpose of this paper is to describe a new slaughter line for industrial slaughtering of salmonid fish. Traditionally, slaughtering of farmed salmonids – salmon and rainbow…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a new slaughter line for industrial slaughtering of salmonid fish. Traditionally, slaughtering of farmed salmonids – salmon and rainbow trout – was done manually by bleed cutting with knives. Using the new slaughter line that includes 3D machine vision and a bleed‐cutting robot, slaughtering is almost completely automated – nominally requiring only one person to supervise the line and manually bleed cut the fish not handled by the robot.

Design/methodology/approach

The design approach of the salmonid slaughter line focuses on using 3D machine vision and a bleed‐cutting robot with four biaxial pneumatic actuators to handle the slaughtering of pre‐anesthetized salmon and rainbow trout.

Findings

Under normal operating conditions, the slaughter line is capable of automatically slaughtering 85‐95 percent of all fish at an average feed rate of 30‐80 salmon/min, and the remaining 5‐15 percent are slaughtered manually. Several issues have been discovered, that should be addressed to improve the slaughter line.

Originality/value

This paper presents a new complete salmonid slaughter line that has reduced the need for manual labor in salmonid slaughtering plants.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Michael J. Roszkowski and Francis J. Berna

The purpose of this paper is to assess the prestige of the Doctor of Ministry (DMin) among Roman Catholics in leadership positions, who may be a potential market for this degree.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the prestige of the Doctor of Ministry (DMin) among Roman Catholics in leadership positions, who may be a potential market for this degree.

Design/methodology/approach

In a mail survey employing a comparative rating scale, respondents rated the prestige of the DMin relative to six other doctorates: PhD, EdD, PsyD, DBA, MD, and JD.

Findings

Ratings were provided by 184 priests, 73 deacons, and 95 directors of religious education (69 lay, 26 sisters). The DMin carried the least prestige with priests and the most with religious educators, particularly the sisters. In all groups, the DMin fared best on prestige when compared to the professional doctorates (DBA, EdD, PsyD) and worst relative to the traditional degrees (MD, JD, and PhD). When submitted to a cluster analysis, three groups emerged, corresponding to negative (46 percent), neutral (38 percent), and positive (16 percent) impressions of the prestige of the DMin. The majority of the priests (44 percent) were in the negative cluster whereas the largest proportion of deacons (45 percent) and most lay religious educators (71 percent) fell into the neutral cluster. In contrast, the largest proportion of the religious educators who were sisters by background went into the positive cluster (40 percent). With the exception of the sisters, the percentage of each group falling into the positive cluster was quite small and approximately the same size across the remaining three groups (16 percent, 15 percent, and 13 percent). A discriminant analysis of the clusters identified two discriminating functions; the primary function involved perceptions of the DMin relative to the traditional degrees (MD, JD, and PhD), whereas the very minor second function involved how the DMin is perceived in comparison to the newer practice doctorates (EdD, DBA, and PsyD).

Research limitations/implications

The response rate was low.

Practical implications

Currently, owing to its low prestige, the DMin probably does not have a sizable potential market among Roman Catholic priests, but it may appeal more to religious educators.

Social implications

The DMin may be subject to the same concerns and prejudices as raised about other professional doctorates.

Originality/value

Roman Catholics are a non‐traditional audience for the DMin. This degree's perceived prestige was not previously studied in this emerging market.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1967

L.J. Willmer, L.J. Harman and L.J. Salmon

November 10, 1966 Building — Safety regulations — “Working place” — Flat roof — Workman constructing flat concrete roof — No guard‐rails — Man's fall from roof — Whether roof…

Abstract

November 10, 1966 Building — Safety regulations — “Working place” — Flat roof — Workman constructing flat concrete roof — No guard‐rails — Man's fall from roof — Whether roof “working place” — Building (Safety, Health and Welfare) Regulations, 1948 (S.I. 1948, No. 1145), reg.24(1).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 March 2021

Hiroki Takakura

This study examines fisheries affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami in 2011 to explore how the collectivism appears during the recovery process.

1889

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines fisheries affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami in 2011 to explore how the collectivism appears during the recovery process.

Design/methodology/approach

The author questions the context of collaboration after the disaster among independent small-scale fishers in Miyagi by conducting semistructured interviews with more than 50 local fishers with anthropological observations of boat fishing operations and using local documents and statistics.

Findings

The corresponding collaboration among the fishers after the disaster is not a mere “disaster utopia,” but is embedded in the socioecological context of fishing. Fishers have developed individual and group fishing. They have institutionalized competitive distribution for sedentary fish with low resource fluctuation, while outcome-equal distribution is adopted for migratory fish with high resource fluctuation. This forms a fishing continuum that connects competitive individualism with collectivism in the community, which has contributed to resilience for disaster recovery.

Originality/value

The balance between individualism and collectivism is decisively coordinated in socioecological contexts. The multifaceted resource strategy for maritime biodiversity that features family-based occupational differentiation in a community is crucial for disaster recovery of small-scale fishers.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Paul Blyton, Edmund Heery and Peter Turnbull

Presents 35 abstracts from the 2001 Employment Research Unit Annual conference held at Cardiff Business School in September 2001. Attempts to explore the theme of changing…

10705

Abstract

Presents 35 abstracts from the 2001 Employment Research Unit Annual conference held at Cardiff Business School in September 2001. Attempts to explore the theme of changing politics of employment relations beyond and within the nation state, against a background of concern in the developed economies at the erosion of relatively advanced conditions of work and social welfare through increasing competition and international agitation for more effective global labour standards. Divides this concept into two areas, addressing the erosion of employment standards through processes of restructuring and examining attempts by governments, trade unions and agencies to re‐create effective systems of regulation. Gives case examples from areas such as India, Wales, London, Ireland, South Africa, Europe and Japan. Covers subjects such as the Disability Discrimination Act, minimum wage, training, contract workers and managing change.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 24 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Sylvain Charlebois, Simon Somogyi, Janet Music and Caitlin Cunningham

The purpose of this paper is to measure Canadian attitudes towards genetic engineering in food, for both plant-based and livestock, assess trust towards food safety and overall…

1232

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure Canadian attitudes towards genetic engineering in food, for both plant-based and livestock, assess trust towards food safety and overall regulatory system in Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study is derived from an inductive, quantitative analysis of primary data obtained from an online survey of adults, aged 18 and over, living in Canada for at least 12 months. An online survey was widely distributed in both French and English. Data were collected from 1,049 respondents. The sample was randomized using regional and demographic benchmarks for an accurate representation of the Canadian population. The completion rate of the survey was 94 per cent. Based on the sampling design, the margin of error is 3.1 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

Findings

Consumers misunderstand the nature of genetic engineering or do not appreciate its prevalence in agrifood or both. In total, 44 per cent of Canadians are confused about health effects of genetically engineered foods and ingredients. In total, 40 per cent believe that there is not significant testing on genetically engineered food to protect consumers. In total, 52 per cent are uncertain on their consumption of genetically engineered food, despite its prominence in the agrifood marketplace. Scientific literacy of respondents on genetic engineering is low. While Canadians are divided on purchasing genetically engineered animal-based products, 55 per cent indicated price is the most important factor when purchasing food.

Research limitations/implications

More research is required to better appreciate the sociological and economic dimensions of incorporating GM foods into our lives. Most importantly, longitudinal risks ought to be better understood for both plant- and animal-based GM foods and ingredients. Additional research is needed to quantify the benefits and risks of GM crops livestock, so business practices and policies approach market expectations. Significantly, improving consumers’ scientific literacy on GM foods will reduce confusion and allow for more informed purchasing decisions. Indeed, a proactive research agenda on biotechnologies can accommodate well-informed discussions with public agencies, food businesses and consumers.

Originality/value

This exploratory study is one of the first to compare consumers’ perceptions of genetic engineering related to animal and plant-based species in Canada since the addition of genetically modified salmon to the marketplace.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1972

L.J. Davies, Edmund Davies and L.J. Buckley

July 6,1971 Building — Construction Regulations — “Working place” — Guard‐rails to be erected where workmen liable to fall more than six feet six inches — Partly demolished…

Abstract

July 6,1971 Building — Construction Regulations — “Working place” — Guard‐rails to be erected where workmen liable to fall more than six feet six inches — Partly demolished building — Floorboards removed to make four—feet—wide passageways with gap in between — Whether passageways a “working place” — Whether “impracticable” to erect guard‐rails — Construction (Working Places) Regulations, 1966 (S.I. 1966, No. 94), regs. 28(1), 38(1).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2022

Kathryn Thory

This chapter explores women leaders’ outward appearance in the male-dominated world of rail, through the lenses of postfeminism and neoliberalism. Drawing on 31 interviews with

Abstract

This chapter explores women leaders’ outward appearance in the male-dominated world of rail, through the lenses of postfeminism and neoliberalism. Drawing on 31 interviews with women leaders in rail, it maps how a postfeminist logic is evident in women leaders’ narratives of aesthetic femininity. Aesthetic femininity refers to women leaders’ outward appearance which they describe as feminine. The research participants justify their feminine ‘work style’ through postfeminist themes of individual choice, natural sex differences, irony, personal initiative, skill and empowerment. The findings also show a patterning of justification around aesthetic femininity that fits a neoliberal self-governance as enterprise, self-flexibility and self-confidence. It is argued that whilst these iterations of aesthetic femininity are rooted in postfeminist and neoliberal contexts, they have consequences for sustaining gendered inequalities and traditional feminine norms in the highly masculinised culture of rail. Women’s narratives, whereby gender inequalities are acknowledged then subsumed into individualised agency through dress and appearance, do little to challenge the gendered culture in this sector.

Details

Women, Work and Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-670-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1967

J. Blain

April 10, 1967 Building — Safety regulations — Roof — Barrel roof ending in flat roof at either end — Flat roof 20 feet from ground — Workman on duckboard on barrel roof

Abstract

April 10, 1967 Building — Safety regulations — Roof — Barrel roof ending in flat roof at either end — Flat roof 20 feet from ground — Workman on duckboard on barrel roof — Workman's fall from roof — Whether flat roof a “working place”— Whether flat roof or duckboard a “gangway”—Whether duckboard “adequate foothold”— Whether duckboard “safe meats of access and egress” — Building (Safety, Health and Welfare) Regulations, 1948 (S. I. 1948, No. 1145), regs. 24(1), 27(2), 31(1) — Construction (General Provisions) Regulations, 1961 (S. I. 1961 No. 1580) reg.7(1).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 2 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

1 – 10 of 149